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CNBC spotlights most popular brews at GABF

The cable network looked at the breweries with the longest lines at the largest beer festival in the U.S., including Denver's Black Project.

Excerpt:

There are two types of winners at the Great American Beer Festival: Those that walk away with one of the coveted medals from the show's judges and those that claim an unofficial people's choice award. 

The two often intersect, but it's not a sure thing. Yet in the two days before the awards are announced at the country's premier beer festival, beer lovers roam the hall, which is roughly the size of seven football fields and hosts roughly 800 brewers, sharing notes and rushing to try offerings with the strongest word-of-mouth buzz.

Some of the brewers that regularly have lines of 50 or more people are already iconic names in the craft beer world. Russian River Brewing (maker of the eternally popular Pliny the Elder) and Avery Brewing (whose Callipygian has been especially in demand at this year's show), for instance, regularly see people wait patiently for a 1-ounce sample of their products, only to walk to the back of the line and wait again for another.

Read the rest here.

13th Floor tops HauntedHouse.com's list of best haunts in U.S.

The 13th Floor in Denver topped HauntedHouse.com's list of America's Best Haunts for 2016. The sister haunt, The Asylum, ranked fourth.

Excerpt:

Haunted houses have long been a tradition of Halloween, evolving from basic tents and street fairs to the sophisticated spook factories of today featuring Hollywood-quality make up and special effects. Around the nation, long lines of thrill-seekers pay in a range from $20 to $50 per ticket for an hour or more of controlled fright. According to research about the business of haunted houses, this industry made popular through the late 1990s and early 2000 is now growing by leaps and bounds.

America’s Best Haunts was established to honor the attractions that are head and shoulders above the rest.  Any haunt can haunt America but only a select few can proudly proclaim that they have been selected as one of "America's Best."

Read the rest here.

Energy.gov previews the 2017 Solar Decathlon in Denver

A year to the day before the event, the U.S. Department of Energy posted a preview of the Solar Decathlon 2017 to be held in Denver.

Excerpt:

Zero-emission electric vehicles charge along the street. People walk along LED-lighted sidewalks. A commuter train drops travelers off from the airport to enjoy dinner at a corner café. And the houses? They're entirely powered by sunshine.

This might sound like a scene from the distant future, but it's not as far away as you think. Exactly one year from today, Solar Decathlon 2017 will kick off in Denver. The biennial competition challenges teams of college students from around the country to design, build and operate beautiful solar-powered houses that are ultra-energy efficient and balance innovation with cost effectiveness. Fourteen Solar Decathlon student teams are now hard at work refining their initial plans for houses designed to provide shelter after disasters, conserve water and achieve other goals.

The Solar Decathlon houses will join the landscape at Peña Station Next, a burgeoning "smart city" between downtown Denver and the airport that city planners began mapping out several years ago. The plan calls for adding 1.5 million square feet of corporate office space, 500,000 square feet of retail stores, 2,500 solar-powered residential units, and 1,500 hotel rooms to the space separating the vibrant urban hub from the nation’s largest airport in total land area.

Read the rest here.

Fox News spotlights Rise of the Rest in Denver

The story posed a big question: "What can other cities learn from Denver about how the rest can rise?"

Excerpt:

Today, we toured Denver on a bus to see an entrepreneurial ecosystem that, actually, compared to many places, is doing pretty well. According to the Kauffman Foundation, Denver is one of the top five cities in startup activity, and Colorado ranks fourth out of 50 states. Two decades ago, that wouldn’t have been the case. As we visit cities across the country, we often hear what's not working -- we need more capital, more connectivity, better founders.

While Denver is self-aware that they can do so much more, they're on an encouraging pathway to how a community can do its best. At lunch, Steve Case talked about the "three Ps" of the Web's Third Wave. In reflecting on Denver, I saw three Ps that have made Colorado a great startup community.

Read the rest here.

Bloomberg analyzes Denver housing market

It's gone from superheated to merely hot as year-over-year gains moderated slightly in 2016.

Excerpt:

The prices have gotten too heated for many buyers in Denver, which has seen a slowdown since the beginning of the year, said Wade Perry, a managing broker at Coldwell Banker Devonshire in the area.

"Buyers are starting to push back and say, 'I'm not going to pay that much for that house,'" Perry said.
 
The median home value in Denver rose 10 percent in August from a year earlier to $353,300, according to Zillow. While that's still one of the top increases in the country, it's down from an almost 16 percent surge in the same period of 2015.

Read the rest here.

SI reports on Tom Brady's reaction to Denver-made Tom Brady mask

The New England Patriots quarterback called the hyper-realistic mask made by Denver's Landon Meier of Hyperflesh "probably the creepiest thing I've ever seen," reported Sports Illustrated.

Excerpt:

Yeah, it's pretty scary, and you can count Brady among those who thinks the mask lies squarely in the uncanny valley.

"I spent a little time with [Welker] on Sunday morning, he showed it to me," Brady said during his weekly Westwood One radio appearance on Monday. "It was probably the creepiest thing I've ever seen."

Read the rest here.

WSJ showcases FasTracks

The Wall Street Journal reported on the successes and challenges of Denver's transit expansion.

Excerpt:

The system opened two new rail lines this year -- one to the city's airport and one to northern suburbs -- both operated under contract by private company Denver Transit Partners LLC. Two more lines are scheduled to open by the end of 2016.

Financially, RTD is "basically doing everything right," said Jeff Brown, who researches public-transit system finances and is chairman of Florida State University's Department of Urban and Regional Planning.

Still, in 2013 the RTD spent the most in capital costs per passenger ride among the nation's 15 largest transit agencies, due to the cost of its buildout. And it isn't immune from economic concerns.

Read the rest here.

Poynter digs into The Cannabist

The Poynter Institute delved into the story and successes of The CannabistThe Denver Post's marijuana news site.

Excerpt:

The smell of marijuana lingered in the air as the leaders of Colorado's emerging cannabis industry passed around business cards -- and joints -- in a networking event held by the newspaper.

"It was great," said Ricardo Baca, who emceed the event (held on April 20). "Everybody knew everybody...networking, passing around business cards, saying 'oh, you keep the rest of that joint.'"

. . .

Baca (who refrains from consuming marijuana during work hours) is the founding editor of The Cannabist, a website that launched in December 2013, just three days before legal marijuana sales began in Colorado. In the years since, Baca and his tiny staff have grown the website into a fully fledged multi-platform vertical that competes with some of the biggest names in cannabis coverage -- High TimesLeafly and Merry Jane. In July, The Cannabist drew 732,000 unique visitors, less than 150,000 uniques behind industry leader High Times.

Read the rest here.

Florida startup Cuttlesoft expands to Denver

Standout software developer and IT services firm Cuttlesoft picked Denver over Raleigh for its second office, reported the Tallahassee Democrat.

Excerpt:

Cuttlesoft's name is a mashup of cuttlefish, the startup's logo and inspiration as an adaptable animal, and software, the startup's bread and butter. In less than two years, Valcarcel and Morehouse have worked side by side building a tech-based company specializing in IT and software services, consulting, auditing and web applications for its growing list of clients.

. . .

Now they'e preparing to work in dual time zones as it opens a second office in lower downtown Denver. The company -- the Tallahassee Chamber of Commerce's 2016 Startup of the Year -- wanted to expand to a market with a robust tech presence. The finalists? Denver and Raleigh, North Carolina.

. . .

"We wouldn’t be there or growing and expanding our business in both places if we hadn’t gotten started here," Valcarcel said. "If we had moved to Silicon Valley … I don’t think we would have had the capital to break ground."

Read the rest here.

The Source spotlights Wheelchair Sports Camp

Denver hip-hop group Wheelchair Sports Camp's new album and video got the attention of The Source.

Excerpt:

Before producer/keyboardist Ikey Owens (Jack WhiteMars Volta, Free Moral Agents) tragically passed away at 38 years old, he made one, final masterpiece -- Wheelchair Sports Camp's album, No Big Deal. Fronted by the sole female MC Kalyn Heffernan, the Denver trio has taken the Hip Hop community by storm with its jazz-infused take on the genre.

Recently signed to Sage Francis' new digital platform, SFDigi, Wheelchair Sports Camp has shared the innovative visuals for the first single from the album, "Mary Had A Little Band."

Read the rest (and watch the video) here.

TimeOut calls Denver fifth-best city lo live in the U.S.

Denver ranked on the list high due to its parks, proximity to the Rockies, transit, music and beer -- plus legal marijuana.

Excerpt:

Denver is one of the fastest-growing cities in the nation, boasting 83,000 new residents since 2010. Educated millennials lead the charge, drawn to Denver's cool music scene, dozens of breweries, public transportation network -- including bike share -- and, in some cases, the legalization of marijuana in Colorado. 

Read the rest here.

Popular Mechanics names DIA one of "The 20 Most Impressive Airports in the World"

Denver International Airport was on Popular Mechanics' list of "The 20 Most Impressive Airports in the World."

Excerpt:

If you consider just land area, Denver International Airport is the largest in the United States at more than 33,000 acres, twice the size of Manhattan. Construction for the 1995 opening of the airport removed about 110 million cubic yards of earth, making way for an underground tunnel system to move baggage, a 1.5-million-square-foot terminal, the nation's second-tallest control tower, and the nation's longest runway at 16,000 feet. And then there's the 32-foot-tall statue of a blue bronco.

Read the rest here.

Telegraph asks: "Is Denver becoming America's coolest city?"

The British newspaper peered into the city in a travel feature and came away with an appreciation for its beer, art and most everything else.

Excerpt:

The first permanent building in Denver wasn’t a church, a home or a bank; it was a saloon. Now, more than 150 years after gold prospectors first began to arrive, Denverites still clearly love their beer.

. . .

Simply strolling or cycling around the city (Denverites love bikes as much as they love beer) gives you an idea of the remarkable amount of choice here for hop-heads. There’s a German brewery (Prost Brewing Company), an English brewery (Hogshead), a hippy brewery (Vine Street Pub & Brewery), and even a heavy metal brewery (TRVE Brewing Company). For the truly thirsty, you can seamlessly link many of the best establishments together, on foot or bike, via the popular Denver Beer Trail, with free downloadable maps. The Denver Beer Fest, a nine-day gala of local brews held in the autumn, is an enjoyable way to tap into the scene, and the Great American Beer Festival, following swiftly behind, showcases more than 3,000 beers from across the USA at Denver’s Colorado Convention Center.

But it's not all about pints and pitchers: Denver as a whole is very much on the up. The second fastest growing city in the country after Austin, it’s also chasing down the Texan capital in the cool stakes too. A magnet for young professionals, the active and outdoorsy, it’s one of the youngest cities in the US too, with a median population age of just 34. 

Read the rest here.

NY Times reports on veterans in Denver marijuana industry

Numerous veterans are working in security for Denver's marijuana industry, reported The New York Times.

Excerpt:

It's nighttime at the Herbal Cure, a south Denver marijuana shop and grow house tucked into a parking lot beside the highway. Inside is a marijuana bounty: thousands of dollars' worth of cannabis plants, boxes of marijuana-infused chocolate, jars of $360-an-ounce weed with names like Frankenberry, Lemon Skunk and Purple Cheddar.

Chris Bowyer, a lanky combat veteran turned cannabis security guard, is outside. He has a .40-caliber pistol on his hip and a few extra magazines stored away, and he is talking about his work on the battlefield. Not the one in Iraq -- the one in Colorado, where criminals seeking to breach marijuana businesses face veterans trying to stop them.

"This is my therapy," Mr. Bowyer said, heading for a place where burglars broke in recently. He checked a fence for signs of a new incursion, then headed to an office to note the night's activities in a rigorously organized logbook. "This is what we did in the military."

Read the rest here.

DRAFT names two Denver spots among "25 breweries on the rise"

Black Project Spontaneous & Wild Ales (formerly Former Future Brewing Co.) and Call to Arms Brewing Co. made DRAFT's national roundup of "25 breweries on the rise."

Excerpt:

James and Sarah Howat began fermenting the first Black Project beer in February 2014 in a back room at Former Future, the Denver brewery they were preparing to launch. Both breweries have found success, but Black Project stayed under classified status for a while.The husband-and-wife duo didn’t even tell most Former Future employees what was happening in that room; it remained an Area 51 until eight months later. Once the first Black Project beer was released, the floodgates opened. Geeks clamored for the sour and funky brews, all made with native, wild microflora (the Howats don’t purchase any yeast for Black Project beers from a lab).

Read the rest here.
653 Articles | Page: | Show All
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