| Follow Us:

Washington Park West : Innovation & Job News

24 Washington Park West Articles | Page: | Show All

Lyft Locates Driver Hub in Steam on the Platte

Rideshare company Lyft has opened a driver Hub at Steam on the Platte in Denver’s Sun Valley neighborhood.

Lyft chose Steam on the Platte for its driver support center because of its convenient access to highways and thoroughfares, as well as the development’s location in the heart of Denver.

When development firm Urban Ventures was discussing the types of tenants it wanted to locate in Steam on the Platte, words like entrepreneurial, energetic and pioneering came to mind, says Susan Powers, president of the firm.

“We love the values of Lyft,” Powers says. “We love the way you treat your drivers and customers.”

Steam on the Platte is within walking distance of the Auraria campus and the Broncos' stadium. It also is at the intersection of the Lakewood Gulch and Platte River bike paths and a short walk to two light-rail stations at Decatur-Federal and West Auraria.

Urban Ventures and White Construction Group formed a partnership to acquire the property in 2014 from the estate of the late Englewood-based real estate agent Arvin Weiss. At the time of the acquisition, there were two illegal marijuana grows operating and the Evil Souls motorcycle gang had taken over one of the buildings as its clubhouse.

Urban Ventures and White have since created a mixed-use project that has attracted several other tenants in addition to Lyft. NIMBL, a technology consulting company, moved into the space in September. Two Denver architecture firms also have moved into Steam: Olson Lavoie and Davis Wince.

Urban Ventures and White Construction have started working on the next phase of the project: converting a 6,000-square-foot former gas station with a bowstring roof into a restaurant. The other buildings on the 3.2-acre site have been demolished to make way for more office space and residential buildings.

AAA moves to Tech Center; Green Solutions takes its space

AAA Colorado is relocating its corporate headquarters to the Denver Tech Center after the sale of its 63,335-square-foot office building at 4100 E. Arkansas to Denver-based Tributary Real Estate.

Tributary plans to renovate the building for The Green Solution’s (TGS) corporate office.

“At Tributary, we pride ourselves on achieving a high level of involvement in creating lasting partnerships with our clients, working closely with them to determine how our investment, development and brokerage services can be combined to support their business objectives,” says Ryan Arnold,  principal of the firm. “We’ve developed a strong relationship with TGS Management through several successful transactions over the past four years, and we look forward to continuing the relationship as TGS Management grows as an organization.”

TGS Management is a vertically integrated cannabis operations company that employs more than 660 people in cultivation, manufacturing, research and development and retail. About 125 employees will move into the new space on Arkansas.

“We’ve worked with Tributary for several years on our real estate,” says Kyle Speidell, co-founder of TGS Management. “Their commitment to understanding our short- and long-term goals and their ability to deliver solutions tailored to our unique needs has helped to propel our growth and expand our real estate holdings.”

The Green Solution currently owns 12 retail locations across Colorado and 300,000 square feet of cultivation facilities.

AAA moves to Tech Center; Green Solutions takes its space

AAA Colorado is relocating its corporate headquarters to the Denver Tech Center after the sale of its 63,335-square-foot office building at 4100 E. Arkansas to Denver-based Tributary Real Estate.

Tributary plans to renovate the building for The Green Solution’s (TGS) corporate office.

“At Tributary, we pride ourselves on achieving a high level of involvement in creating lasting partnerships with our clients, working closely with them to determine how our investment, development and brokerage services can be combined to support their business objectives,” says Ryan Arnold,  principal of the firm. “We’ve developed a strong relationship with TGS Management through several successful transactions over the past four years, and we look forward to continuing the relationship as TGS Management grows as an organization.”

TGS Management is a vertically integrated cannabis operations company that employs more than 660 people in cultivation, manufacturing, research and development and retail. About 125 employees will move into the new space on Arkansas.

“We’ve worked with Tributary for several years on our real estate,” says Kyle Speidell, co-founder of TGS Management. “Their commitment to understanding our short- and long-term goals and their ability to deliver solutions tailored to our unique needs has helped to propel our growth and expand our real estate holdings.”

The Green Solution currently owns 12 retail locations across Colorado and 300,000 square feet of cultivation facilities.

Cannabliss adds CBD-infused oils to massage

How can a massage get more relaxing and relieve more pain? Add Cannabliss, a new partnership between CAUSE+MEDIC and Peace of Mind Massage.

The spa and the skincare company partnered to offer clients a unique service that uses oils infused with cannabidiol (CBD) to help lessen inflammation in muscles.

"Peace of Mind Massage has been a fantastic partner to work with in the development of this new formula within our Cannabliss line," says Jamie Turner, co-founder and owner of CAUSE+MEDIC. "We have been interested in creating a massage-specific line for quite some time and Peace of Mind Massage . . . was the perfect match for the creation of the Peace of Mind/Cannabliss body oil and body butter."

The active ingredient in the new oils and body butters comes from cannabis. However, the cannabis industry is now able to separate CBD from tetrahydrocannabinol, the psychoactive ingredient known as THC in marijuana. CAUSE+MEDIC says though the CBD has restorative properties it does not cause a high and such products are legal throughout the U.S.

"CBD massage can provide relief from chronic pain, muscle soreness and tension, symptoms associated with arthritis and autoimmune dysfunction, psoriasis, chronic dry skin and so much more," says Elena Davis, owner of Peace of Mind Massage at 1249 S. Pearl St. "We are thrilled to be able to offer our new Cannabliss massage to our clients as a safe, therapeutic treatment that anyone can enjoy." 

The Cannabliss massage is currently available by appointment only and is offered at Peace of Mind Massage's regular rates, which start at $78 per hour. In addition, Peace of Mind customers can purchase Cannabliss Body Butter at $40 or Cannabliss Body Oil at $60 exclusively at Peace of Mind Massage.

Contact Confluence Denver Innovation & Jobs News Editor Chris Meehan with tips and leads for future stories at chris@confluence-denver.com.

Rose Community Foundation awarding Innovate for Good grants

The Rose Community Foundation will host an event at the Cable Center on Sept. 14 to award grants through its Innovate for Good program, which is supporting youth projects and youth-adult projects with a total of $250,000. The program announced the nine finalists for the youth-adult partnerships this week and will choose the six awardees, each of which will receive $30,000 to realize their projects, at the event.

The organization already selected four youth-led projects to each receive a $5,000 grant and support to realize their projects. The youth awards will support the CeC Early College Mentorship Program, which will mentor-match high school junior students with high-school freshmen; the Juniors for Seniors project to build one-on-one relationships with teen volunteers and nursing home residents; the Stories Worth Saving project for teens to document stories of assisted-living residents; and the Theatre for Social Change Group project which aims to offer teens ways to use the arts to explore difficult social issues. 

For 2016, the second year for the awards, the foundation asked youth and youth partnering with adults to develop projects that answer the question: "What idea could you bring to life to empower youth to make the community better?"

Last year's awards challenge didn't have a thematic focus, according to Sarah Indyk, Rose Community Foundation's director of special projects. This year it was separated into two different pathways, with the youth awards and the youth-adult awards. "The youth-led projects were really conceived of by youths without formal adult partners," she explains. She adds that since the adult-youth partnership projects are a lot different it made sense to go through a parallel process; the Sept. 14 event will decide which youth-adult projects will be funded.

“Both groups will benefit from extensive training coaching and support from the Youth Leadership Institute,” Indyk says. "We're running a full incubator providing support to all awardees and finalists. It's a way we could support all the finalists even if they don't receive funds. That amounts to $50,000 in additional support."

Visit rcfdenver.org/IFG to learn more about the program and finalists.

Contact Confluence Denver Innovation & Jobs News Editor Chris Meehan with tips and leads for future stories at chris@confluence-denver.com.

Denver proposes dedicated fund for affordable housing

On July 13, Denver Mayor Michael Hancock and Councilwoman Robin Kniech introduced the details of the city's plan to create funding to support affordable housing.

Pending approval by Denver City Council, the funding will be generated by way of development fees and property taxes. Over the next 10 years, the new funding stream could generate $150 million, allowing for the construction of 6,000 new homes for low- to moderate-income families in the city and catalyze thousands of jobs in the process.

"There is no more important a priority in Denver right now than affordable housing," Mayor Hancock said. "In my state of the city speech yesterday, I spoke about the thousands of people who lack the simple advantages so many of us take for granted, like a place to call home. Home ownership gives families a foundation to build equity, build wealth and build a life. This is a fair, balanced and modest approach to address one of the most pressing problems facing Denver today."

The proposal from the mayor's office are expected to cost residential property owners $1 a month and commercial property owners $145 annually for every $1 million worth of commercial valuation. It also would establish a one-time development fee on new construction projects collected when a project receives its building permit. Residential construction fees for single-family homes will carry a 60 cent per square foot fee and multi-family homes will carry a $1.50 per square foot fee. Industrial projects will pay a 40 cents per square foot fee and retail, hotel and other commercial development will pay a $1.70 per square foot fee.

"By pairing a small portion of the property tax revenue that Denver voters approved almost four years ago with what would be one of the lowest one-time fees on new residential and commercial development in the nation, our broader community will be coming together with a sector of the economy generating some of the demand to create a bold solution for affordable housing in Denver," Kniech contended.

Contact Confluence Denver Innovation & Jobs News Editor Chris Meehan with tips and leads for future stories at chris@confluence-denver.com.

Innovate for Good 2016 challenges Denver to empower youth with up to $250K

Rose Community Foundation has announced its Innovate for Good 2016 challenge. This year, the organization is calling for people to answer the following question: What idea could you bring to life to empower youth to make the community better?

"We believe Denver's youth can do great things," says Lisa Robinson, Rose Community Foundation trustee and chair of the Innovate for Good Committee. "And, through the Innovate for Good project, we are thrilled to give them a voice and the resources to help make our community even better."

The challenge not only asks what can empower youth in the city, it asks youth between 13 and 18 to propose ideas. Adults, working as equal partners with youth, can submit their ideas through through the foundation's website. Submissions must be in by May 31 and the submission process requires applicants to answer a series of questions and submit a video, up to a minute long, about their team's idea. Finalists will be announced in August and awardees will be selected in September.

"More than ever, as the greater Denver community continues to grow, empowering youth to inspire change can have great benefits for the next generation," Robinson says. "They have the energy, talent and potential to share innovative ideas, and we felt it was time to tap directly into their experiences and perspective." 

In all, the foundation will award up $250,000 in grants to implement winning ideas. The foundation says it is looking for innovative Denver-based projects that can make an impact within a year.

The foundation launched the Innovation for Good Challenge in 2015. It had more than 400 applicants and awarded grants to 10 proposals.

Contact Confluence Denver Innovation & Jobs News Editor Chris Meehan with tips and leads for future stories at chris@confluence-denver.com.


MSU Denver, Colorado Heights University partner to create multi-campus university

Under a new partnership between Metropolitan State University of Denver (MSU) and Colorado Heights University (CHU), MSU will acquire significant portions of the historical Loretto Heights campus in southwest Denver from Colorado Heights University. The partnership will help position MSU Denver for challenges in the future and renew its focus on international education and serving underrepresented students.

"This was a values-based decision for CHU," explains MSU Denver President Stephen Jordan. "Our two institutions have a mutual respect for each other's role and mission. CHU was especially supportive of our 2012 decision to offer a special tuition rate for undocumented students. We are extremely grateful and honored to have been selected by CHU for this remarkable opportunity and collaboration."

Under the partnership CHU will continue to offer its programs and expand them to help bring more international students into MSU Denver. CHU also will become an exclusive ESL provider for MSU Denver to help attract more international students.

The universities will strive to fulfill CHU's and Loretto Heights' missions to educate a globally diverse student population and local residents. As such they will explore options for developing 18 acres of the campus as an international business park that would be an experiential learning site for students. They also plan develop an alliance of international universities.

"It is only fitting that in the University's 50th year, and a few months after the 50th anniversary of the Higher Education Act, that we begin taking steps to chart our future," Jordan says. "This partnership with CHU is a significant way for MSU Denver to firmly plant one foot in our heritage and the other in our future."

The transaction is expected to close with MSU Denver taking ownership of the property by July 1, 2016. It anticipates offering some MSU classes there as early as fall 2016.


Contact Confluence Denver Innovation & Jobs News Editor Chris Meehan with tips and leads for future stories at chris@confluence-denver.com.


Rose Community Foundation announces Innovate for Good winners

Earlier in 2015, Rose Community Foundation announced its first Innovate for Good challenge, a competition to fund projects with grants aimed at making Denver better. On June 18 at the organization's 20th anniversary celebration, the foundation announced nine winners in the competition.

Applicants responded to the question: "What new and innovative idea would you bring to life to make the Greater Denver community a better place to live?" The response was strong with the competition receiving nearly 400 proposals. A team of 130 community members evaluated applications based on their innovation, creativity, feasibility and the entrants' ability to make a measurable difference within a year.

Sheila Bugdanowitz, president and CEO of Rose Community Foundation, introduced the winners. "We are delighted to announce the winners of our Innovate for Good project tonight at our 20th Anniversary celebration. Every person in the room will have a chance to learn about this innovative work."

The foundation gave out $250,000 in all, including an additional $20,000 to Workshop on Wheels, which won a live audience choice award at the gala. Workshop on Wheels was submitted by Be the Gift. The Workshop on Wheels won a grant to create a mobile workshop outfitted with tools and materials that will use volunteers to complete home repair projects for single-mom families.

The other awards were granted to:

  • Bright by Text, a text-messaging system that sends parents evidence-based tips to support young childhood development submitted by Bright by Three.
  • The Clean River Design Challenge from The Greenway Foundation, which challenges Metro State University of Denver design students to remove trash from the South Platte River.
  • The Arts Street Creative Youth Take Flight – La Alma Connection project to produce a master art plan that will help educate youth about urban design, creative placemaking and economic development to encourage pedestrian use of the light rail and 10th Avenue in the La Alma neighborhood.
  • The Fresh Food Connect app submitted by Groundwork Denver to allow home gardeners to donate extra produce for distribution at food banks and through affordable sale. The app will connect gardeners with youth who will be employed to pick up and deliver donated produce.
  • The Race, Policing and Community Justice Advocates program submitted by the Shorter Community AME Church to partner with other community stakeholders. The program will help high school students become peer presenters focusing on racial equality, community awareness based policing and justice advocacy.
  • Shakespeare in the Parking Lot, a project from the Denver Center for the Performing Arts to provide performances to high school students in school parking lots. The performances will be followed by actor-led workshops.
  • The Stompin' Ground Games from the Warm Cookies of the Revolution organization which fosters a year-long Olympics-style competition between Denver neighborhoods focusing on arts, culture and history.
  • Veterans in Food Deserts, a project by the Denver Botanic Gardens to help military veterans grow and sell fresh produce at farm stands in neighborhoods with limited access to healthy foods, and share knowledge about gardening and healthy nutrition.
Since Rose Community Foundation's inception in 1995, it has donated more than $277 million aimed at improving Denver.

Contact Confluence Denver Innovation & Jobs News Editor Chris Meehan with tips and leads for future stories at chris@confluence-denver.com.

Laws Whiskey House introduces Secale, a Colorado-sourced rye whiskey

When Laws Whiskey House opened publicly last year, the company introduced a complex bottle called A.D. Laws Four Grain Bourbon using corn, wheat, rye and barley. Now it is introducing two more offerings in A.D. Laws Secale Straight Rye Whiskey Married Batch 1 and A.D. Laws Secale Straight Rye Whiskey Single Barrel Cask Strength, both of which are unique in using rye grown on a family farm in the San Luis Valley and malted in Colorado.

When Laws introduced the four-grain bourbon last year, it turned heads. Bucking trends of many startup distilleries, namesake Al Laws and head distiller Jake Norris, Stranahan's first distiller, worked under the name Project Gargoyle and waited  nearly three years to introduce a whiskey distilled and aged in Colorado, rather than use imported spirits or distilling other spirits like vodka or rum while the whiskey aged. Now the company is introducing a rye whiskey that it's already aged for three years.

The rye in the whiskey is harvested fresh, cleaned and malted by the Colorado Malting Company, within a week of harvest, according to Laws. Quickly thereafter, it's delivered to the distillery where it's cooked and open-air fermented to lock in the fresh flavor.

The married batch is 100 proof (or 50 percent alcohol -- many whiskeys are barreled much lower proofs like 80 proof) and sells for $78 a bottle. The single-barrel rye is poured from "the cream" -- the first half of the first 10 casks and -- is bottled at cask strength: an average of 139 proof. It's selling for $110 a bottle.

Contact Confluence Denver Innovation & Jobs News Editor Chris Meehan with tips and leads for future stories at chris@confluence-denver.com.


Tonix brings fresh flavor to an old staple

If you've ever tasted store-bought tonic water, you've probably used the quinine-laced stuff to make a gin and tonic. But you've probably never enjoyed drinking tonic water on its own. Denver's Tonix is changing that.

The syrup is made in Denver with cinchona bark from South America, as were the original tonic waters that were developed to help combat malaria in the 1840s. The bark gives the concentrate its distinctive ruddy color.

Since it's a concentrate, imbibers can tweak the flavor by adding more or less to a drink, whether they're using soda water or not, explains Tonix founder Travis Gilbert. Also it's shelf stable, so it won't go bad after it's opened.

"I love gin and I love gin and tonics," Gilbert says. His late father-in-law introduced him to gin and tonics. "The first thing he asked me was if I wanted one."

"I was disappointed with the tonics on the market," Gilbert says. "And I thought: 'If there's not anything on the market, why not make it on my own.'" He explains that there are a few craft tonics available and a few craft tonic concentrates available as well. But he developed Tonix to be a bit more versatile.

The company recently had a launch party where it introduced the syrup to potential buyers: restaurants, liquor stores and bars. Already some local companies like Nooch Vegan Market, Bear Creek Distillery, Hugo's Colorado Beer & Spirits and Grandma's House Brewery are carrying and using the copper-colored concentrate.

Tonix is currently only selling the concentrate. However, Gilbert anticipates making a ready-to-drink tonic water for sale.

Contact Confluence Denver Innovation & Jobs News Editor Chris Meehan with tips and leads for future stories at chris@confluence-denver.com.

Bear Creek Distillery wins awards with unique take on noble spirits

Just off Broadway in the Overland neighborhood, Bear Creek Distillery is a new operation -- its whiskeys haven't even had a full year to age yet -- but its spirits are already winning awards.

In March, Bear Creek Distillery won three awards at the Denver International Spirits Competition, an event that attracted companies as big as Beam Suntory (makers of Jim Beam and its family of products). But Bear Creek took home the gold in the Vodka Potato category with its 100 percent Wheat Vodka, and two silvers in the Vodka Rye and Rum White categories.

"Our vodkas are sort of unique because we make grain-specific vodka," explains co-founder Jay Johnson. "Typically a vodka off the shelf you'll find are mixed grain or potato. Potato vodkas are relatively common. It is relatively uncommon to find a vodka that is 100 percent wheat or 100 percent rye," he says of the award-winning spirits.

The Silver Rum, which isn't aged, also won an award at the show. "Rum is easy to make. It's ingredients are easy to clean up, you can get it bottled within a month," Johnson says. In fact, vodka is harder to make because it has to be distilled to such a high proof. "It has a to be 190 proof," he says.

These spirits are just the start for the nascent distillery. "We hope to release our Silver Rum that has been aged in used Wild Turkey barrels, and then we also do a house-infused spiced rum," Johnson explains. "We mirror our vodka with a rye whiskey that we hope to have available by the holidays or in the beginning of the year for our tasting room. That goes the same for our wheat whiskey. Our bourbon probably won't ready until 2017."

That's because of the nature of spirits like whiskey. They don't have a set completion date and need to mature at their own pace. While some distillers are importing spirits from other states to age or blend here in Colorado, that's not the case with Bear Creek.

"We do everything grain to glass right here in our facility off Broadway," Johnson says. "I understand the lure of it doing it the other way . . . but we do things as genuinely as possible, so we're going to bite the bullet and battle father time until the bourbon is ready and the whiskey is as well. In my opinion, that's the right way to do things."

Since it's so new, the distillery doesn't yet have extensive retail distribution, but the tasting room is just the place for quaffs and cocktails. "For all intents and purposes, it's a bar, but we can only serve liquor with things that we've made," Johnson says. That means no store-bought bitters, cordials or vermouth. "We have to get really creative with fresh juices and herbs and things like that. We've gotten really good at recreating cocktails with things that we're allowed to use."

The tasting room is open from Thursday to Saturday. During the rest of the week, Johnson and the crew are busy making more spirits and tending to those that are aging.

Contact Confluence Denver Innovation & Jobs News Editor Chris Meehan with tips and leads for future stories at chris@confluence-denver.com.

Cabal opens innovative 3D art show

A charcoal-hued gun looms overhead, popping off the paper as its lower corners flutter on a slight breeze. It's surrounded by plethora of other 3D posters evoking R. Crumb, psychedelia and more menacing imagery on the walls of South Broadway's Cabal Enterprises.

The posters debuted Friday the 13th when Cabal unveiled Mutiny 3D featuring 36 artists from around the world. The unique and trippy show was curated by Denver-artist Adam Stone who solicited works from internationally renowned artists as far away as Japan, Lithuania and Bulgaria.

Stone took the mono-dimensional works of art from the artists and painstakingly rendered them into red-cyan three-dimensional artworks using a computer. "I actually cut each individual piece in the artwork out, move it then paint the depth onto each piece, then render it in red and cyan," he says. It's a painstaking process and one drawing could consist of as many as 5,000 layers of tiny clippings rearranged to create the three-dimensional effect by the time he finished it.

Of all the artists in the exhibition only one, David 2000, actually rendered his contributions in three dimensions. "He has a beautiful 3D book," Stone says.

A few of the other artists had worked in 3D before, according to Stone. They made it easier for him by providing images with layers so he didn't have to do that particular work. But he estimates that converting one of the most intricate drawings to 3D probably took him five to six days.

The show at the Cabal gallery at 1875 S. Broadway is worth a peek and will be up through the end of the month. Stone and Cabal are also publishing 100 copies of a limited-edition book with all of the drawings in it. The book comes with 3D glasses.

Stone's staying busy beyond the gallery. Two of the artists from France, Sam Rictus and Nils Bertho, are working with Stone and volunteers on a giant mural project at Buntport Theater called Chainmail. They'll kick off that event on Sat. Feb. 21.

Contact Confluence Denver Innovation & Jobs News Editor Chris Meehan with tips and leads for future stories at chris@confluence-denver.com.

Black Project Spontaneous Ales debuts two wild ales

There are open fermentation beers, then there are wild beers, that's what Black Project Spontaneous Ales is into, letting its beers be inoculated purely by the wild yeasts and microbes that travel in the air, creating beers that are wholly unique in flavor. As of Feb. 15 from Former Future Brewing Company, the Black Project's wild beers are available in bottles for the first time.

"We expose our wort while still boiling, to the outside air to cool overnight on our roof," says James Howat, co-founder of Former Future and Black Project. "The next morning we put this wort into a barrel or other closed-top vessel and wait for fermentation to start." It can sometimes take four to 10 days for the very small amount of microbes from the air to multiply to a point where the wort is actually being fermented at an appreciable level, he adds, "so our beers are made via open, spontaneous inoculation but closed fermentation."

While these types of beer are produced in Belgium and the U.K. and have been for centuries, there aren't many breweries in the U.S. making them. "To my knowledge, we are the only brewery in Colorado to release a beer made using a coolship and completely spontaneous fermentation," Howat says. The coolship is the open vessel designed to allow the wort to cool and be inoculated by the air at a certain rate.

"Finding out what a small population of wild-caught microbes are going to do with a wort I design is truly my favorite part of brewing and is essentially why Black Project exists," Howat says. "Beers that we intend to eventually sell year-round we can blend and do a variety of things to make sure that the beers are always pretty similar, but even then there will be difference."

The company, a side project of Former Future, has already made a buzz. It debuted Flyby, its coolship spontaneous sour ale, at the Great American Beer Festival in October 2014 and won a bronze medal in the wild ale category. On Sun. Feb. 15, the young company is selling that as well as Jumpseat, a dry-hopped wild ale, at 2 p.m. at Former Future (1290 S. Broadway).

Only 48 750-milliliter bottles of Flyby are available at $35 a bottle, and 120 bottles of Jumpseat are available at $22 a bottle. "These beers are taking an average of 6 months to be ready," Howat says. "So we can't just make more right away just because the demand is so insane," he explains.

The nascent company, which started brewing in February 2014, is already preparing to expand. Howat says there will be as many as five releases between March and September, two with about 2,500 bottles and the others will be in the triple-digit range.

Given the experimental nature of coolship brewing -- 20 percent of the barrels could fail -- and the lengthy time it takes to brew the beer, Howat says he's thinking five years ahead to keep up with future demand.

Contact Confluence Denver Innovation & Jobs News Editor Chris Meehan with tips and leads for future stories at chris@confluence-denver.com.

Experience People, a tour against tech addiction, comes to Denver

You probably spend a little too much time on Facebook, Instagram, Pinterest and Buzzfeed, or you check your iPhone every few minutes. You might call even it an addiction.

This is the focus of Brian Hiss' Experience People. The 20-city tour comes Denver Aug. 17-19 in a very un-techy 1970s Volkswagen van.

"Every American spends 40 minutes on Facebook a day," Hiss claims. "The closest thing I can relate it to is working from home and someone's ringing your doorbell all day. Would you be able to get anything done and be productive?"

Hiss is a co-founder of Dooble, a social media site, which doesn't yet have information on Denver. But this tour is about disengaging from devices and experiencing people and places. "Every experience we're having now is through a device and not out there in the world where it used to be," Hiss contends. "We're not anti-technology -- it's just that technology is there to engage the experience, not be the experience."

The Denver schedule isn't finalized. Hiss says he's barely checking his phone while on the road -- but the tour, which is bing coordinated by Dooble Co-Founder Ryan Bearbower and includes Rob Loud, who's filming the tour for a documentary --already has a number of engagements. They include a live interview on KDVR's Good Day Colorado on Mon. Aug 18, a presentation and discussion at Denver Open Coffee Club and other events.

"What we really hope to get out of this is to really change the course of the entrepreneurial world, the business world and helping them to foster new best processes where we're not creating the habit-forming experiences and manipulating people," Hiss says.

Contact Confluence Denver Innovation & Jobs News Editor Chris Meehan with tips and leads for future stories at chris@confluence-denver.com.
24 Washington Park West Articles | Page: | Show All
Signup for Email Alerts