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AP story delves into the history and present of Five Points, Denver's "Harlem of the West"

The Associated Press story looked at the rich legacy of jazz, African-American history and the neighborhood's modern-day boom.

Excerpt:
 
Denver's Five Points isn't the only historically black enclave changed by population shifts and revitalization. In New York, neighborhoods like Harlem and Brooklyn's Fort Greene have lost black residents as rents have risen. Seminal black-owned landmarks, like Harlem's Lenox Lounge, have shuttered. Activists in Houston's Freeman's Town have worked to prevent brick streets laid by former slaves from being uprooted despite development pressures.

On the other hand, some of Five Points' new businesses are opening in storefronts that have long sat empty, and they're making an effort to recognize the neighborhood's roots.

The 715 Club, founded by the son of a Pullman porter at the corner of Welton and 26th, had been closed for years before a 2016 reopening. "We are a neighborhood bar in the heart of 5 Points trying to preserve a piece of Welton history," the new owners say on their Facebook page.

Read the rest here.

U.S. News & World Report pegs Denver second-best city to live

After topping the list in 2016, Denver was second to only Austin in 2017.

Excerpt:

To clarify a common misconception, Denver is not a mountain town. It actually takes at least an hour to drive to the Rockies. But there are some great places for recreating within a 30-minute drive of downtown, such as Red Rocks Park and Cherry Creek State Park.  

Some might say that Denver is experiencing a gold rush of a different color: green. After Colorado residents voted to legalize recreational marijuana in 2012, Denver has seen a surge in cannabis-related commerce, from dispensaries to magazines to high-tech paraphernalia like vaporizers, rolling papers, lotions and storage containers -- and the industry is just gaining speed. 

Read the rest here.

Mayor Hancock gives Denver travel tips to U.S. News & World Report

His picks included LoDo, the Denver Art Museum and Red Rocks.

Excerpt:

Denver Mayor Michael Hancock has been a key force behind efforts to ramp up tourism in the Mile High City since being elected in 2011, working to expand direct flights to Denver International Airport and improve the airport's facilities. A longtime Denver resident now in his second term, Hancock has seen firsthand how much the city has grown and changed over the years. He says Denver has a special quality that makes the city unique.

"There’s a certain spirit in this city you don’t find everywhere," he tells U.S. News. "It’s a very optimistic, forward-thinking, positive spirit that permeates every sector and every individual."

. . .

Describe your perfect day in Denver.

My family and I would go have brunch at Snooze or one of the great diners in Denver, like the Denver Diner downtown. Then we would go walk the dogs in City Park. Then maybe we’d go to the Denver Zoo, which is well-respected around the country. The primates and the elephants are my favorite animal exhibits. At night, we’d have dinner, then we would go find somewhere to enjoy live music because Denver has more live music venues than Austin, Texas. I love listening to jazz at El Chapultepec and Jazz at Jacks. The Soiled Dove Underground in [the neighborhood of] Lowry has great sound and gets some national acts.

Read the rest here.

Red Rocks makes Business Insider's list of world's 15 most beautiful public spaces

Business Insider named the legendary, Denver-owned amphitheatre to its list alongside Millennium Park in Chicago and London's Trafalgar Square.

Excerpt:

[W]e reached out to urban designers and planners around the world. They told us about spaces that have been game-changers for cities, that inspired them to go into the field, and that they simply find stunning.

Here are 15 of the world's most beautiful parks, libraries, streets, and plazas, according to people who design them for a living.

Read the rest here.

The Source spotlights Wheelchair Sports Camp

Denver hip-hop group Wheelchair Sports Camp's new album and video got the attention of The Source.

Excerpt:

Before producer/keyboardist Ikey Owens (Jack WhiteMars Volta, Free Moral Agents) tragically passed away at 38 years old, he made one, final masterpiece -- Wheelchair Sports Camp's album, No Big Deal. Fronted by the sole female MC Kalyn Heffernan, the Denver trio has taken the Hip Hop community by storm with its jazz-infused take on the genre.

Recently signed to Sage Francis' new digital platform, SFDigi, Wheelchair Sports Camp has shared the innovative visuals for the first single from the album, "Mary Had A Little Band."

Read the rest (and watch the video) here.

TimeOut calls Denver fifth-best city lo live in the U.S.

Denver ranked on the list high due to its parks, proximity to the Rockies, transit, music and beer -- plus legal marijuana.

Excerpt:

Denver is one of the fastest-growing cities in the nation, boasting 83,000 new residents since 2010. Educated millennials lead the charge, drawn to Denver's cool music scene, dozens of breweries, public transportation network -- including bike share -- and, in some cases, the legalization of marijuana in Colorado. 

Read the rest here.

HuffPost Black Voices video profiles Denver's DJ Cavem

DJ Cavem, a.k.a. Ietef Vita, and his pursuit of organic gardening and "kale life" were the focus of a recent video on Huffington Post Black Voices.

Watch the video here.

Skift profiles Visit Denver's experiential marketing strategies

Travel-trade news site Skift took a look at Visit Denver's creative marketing to Chicago event planners.

Excerpt:

Traditionally, destination marketing organizations (DMOs) like Visit Denver have emphasized their urban, hospitality, and transit infrastructure in their marketing messaging targeting big international associations.

Now, however, Denver is shifting toward more experiential and event-based marketing strategies to sell a more dynamic version of the Colorado conference experience to Chicago-based event planners seeking to bigger and better attendance driver.

Last month, for example, Visit Denver installed a re-creation of its famous Red Rocks Amphitheatre in the middle of Chicago's biggest food festival, Taste of Randolph Street, to host all of the musical performances. Located 10 miles outside Denver, Red Rocks is a massive geological formation with natural acoustics that was converted into a permanent venue for outdoor performances back in the 1930s.

Dubbed "Denver Live on the Rocks Stage," the pop-up event facility in Chicago consisted of two 76×30-foot rock wings and a VIP area for the region's top association conference organizers. It offered a more enticing way for event planners to mingle with Visit Denver representatives, versus a standard ballroom cocktail reception.

Read the rest here.

Lara Ruggles dishes on Denver music scene with Weld for Birmingham

Denver-based singer-songwriter Lara Ruggles discussed the local music scene -- and skyrocketing rents -- with Alabama alt-weekly Weld for Birmingham.

Excerpt:

Weld: What is the Denver scene like and how has it affected you as an artist? 

Ruggles: I feel like everyone has different experiences with any given scene, but I've been lucky to find the Denver scene very welcoming and collaborative. Everyone kind of appreciates and shouts out each other's work and I think Denver is so full of so many talented bands and songwriters that any ten people could be involved in a completely different music scene and have hardly any overlap of the bands they know.

I've noticed there is this thing among Denver bands where it seems like all my favorite bands have written at least one song in 7/4 [time signature]. I haven't fulfilled that challenge yet, but I think it's a worthy one. I love Denver, but it's hard to know where I'll end up after this summer's over -- unfortunately rent is rising so fast that it doesn't feel like a place I will be able to live.

Read the rest here.

Relix premieres new video from Slim Cessna's Auto Club

Relix debuted a new video for "Commandment 4," a song from the upcoming album from Denver's one and only Slim Cessna's Auto Club.

Watch:



Read the rest here.

Two Denver venues make "100 Greatest American Music Venues" list

Consequence of Sound named a pair of Denver-area stages to its list of the top 100 music venues in the U.S.: the Bluebird and Red Rocks.

Excerpt:

Denver has its fair share of great music venues -- you'll find another way, way up this list -- but even in a crowded field, the Bluebird Theater stands out. Part of that is its many contradictions, from the twee name for a venue that feels anything but to the vintage architecture and retro marquee that houses a top-notch sound system. But best of all, audiences who flock to see alt-country stalwarts or Guns N' Roses tributes get to embrace the rock-and-roll ethos that comes with a general-admission policy, without worrying that they're not going to be able to see a damned thing.

Read the rest here.

 

Economy essay on Denver spans "cranes, costumes, craft beer and cannabis"

A "My City" essay on Denver from local engineer/musician John Runnels was headlined "cranes, costumes, craft beer and cannabis."

Excerpt:

With so much to do, new people move here every day. Just from the vibrations the city gives off, it’s obvious that the economy is doing well.

Having worked both as a professional musician and as an engineer designing buildings, I have an interesting perspective on what that economy looks like.

Strangely, both jobs are similar in the way the bigger economic picture affects them. Live music is a luxury and usually one of the first expenses cut when budgets are tight. As an engineer, you’re one of the first to know when new buildings are on the way. For me it was extremely noticeable when the recession was coming to an end in 2011. Since then it’s only been an upward trend, evidenced by all that construction and the flourishing music scene.

Read the rest here.

NY Times reports on DeVotchka's take on "Sweeney Todd"

The New York Times reported on DeVotchka's take on "Sweeney Todd: The Demon Barber of Fleet Street" at the Denver Center for the Performing Arts.

Excerpt:

When the orchestra lands its final note -- with a sharpness worthy of the razor-wielding protagonist -- the company bursts into whoops and applause. It is the first time the vocalists have rehearsed with the musicians -- the first time they've heard the new orchestrations arranged, as unlikely as it seems, by the indie rock band DeVotchKa.

"When we hit that last note and they screamed it seriously felt like eight months of tension was doused with the emotion from all these actors," said DeVotchKa's percussionist, Shawn King, who along with bandmates Tom Hagerman and Jeanie Schroder, arranged the score and will play in the pit. "Until this moment, I felt like, 'Are we doing the right thing here? Was it a good idea?'"

Many a theater company lately has done more than merely attend the tale of Sweeney Todd, to quote the show's opening salvo. They've tweaked one of Mr. Sondheim's most diabolically crafted, technically demanding musicals, aiming in some cases to reach beyond the traditional -- and aging -- theater audiences while honoring one of its masters.

Read the rest here.

Metro State partnering with Detroit music school

The Detroit Free Press reported that Metropolitan State University of Denver is opening a campus at  the Detroit Institute of Music Education (DIME).

Excerpt:

MSU Denver administrators visited DIME last year for the first time, "and it was love at first sight," said Kreidler, who said he was particularly impressed by the faculty: "highly credentialed, extremely intelligent and good at what they do."

The new deal is part of a bigger growth strategy for Nixon and Clayman: A Denver campus is expected to open in fall 2017, next in what they hope will be several DIME-branded schools across the country. And there are plans to double the space at the Detroit facility, which now occupies three floors of a Dan Gilbert-owned building.

"It's our dream to have this place full and buzzing with young students," said Clayman.

Read the rest here.

Violent Femmes frontman praises Denver's Mexican food in Guardian interview

Violent Femmes frontman Gordon Gano praised the cheese enchilada from a Denver landmark in a recent interview with The Guardian.

Excerpt:

I like Mexican food very much, and this is my all-time favourite Mexican restaurant. One thing that’s very popular in Denver and the southwest of the United States is green chilli, and theirs is just a beautiful balance of the flavours. It goes on whatever you’re ordering. I’m vegetarian, so it limits what I get, but theirs is the best cheese enchilada I’ve ever had.

Read the rest here.
42 Music Articles | Page: | Show All
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