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102 Move to Denver Articles | Page: | Show All

Albuquerque asks: Why are our people moving to Denver?

The Albuquerque Journal wanted to know why so many folks from Albuquerque have transplanted themselves to Denver lately.

New Mexicans are moving here despite what the story describes as "long traffic jams on major roads that put Albuquerque’s commuter woes to shame and a median home cost that’s double Albuquerque’s."

The economy has a lot to do with it:

"Unemployment in New Mexico has ranked as one of the highest in the nation, registering 6.4 percent in June. Colorado, meanwhile, has been shattering its own state records, with a 2.3 percent rate in June. Colorado and North Dakota have the lowest in the nation."

But there's more, as one of the interviewed transplants, Andrew Webb, notes:

“There is a sense of vibrance and positivity,” Webb said. “It’s very exciting here right now.”

Read the entire report here.


 

Inman offers tips for booming cities from Denver

The real estate news site looked at how housing inventory, affordability and other issues are being handled in Denver.

Excerpt:

Trends that metro Denver experienced last year due to housing demand are opportunities that real estate agents can leverage in growing cities such as Charleston, Houston, Raleigh, Fort Myers and Austin.

So, what can other markets projected to have skyrocketing populations in 2017 glean from Denver?

First, for perspective, our January 2016 market trends report stated: "Looking forward into 2016, the top concerns are tight inventory, home affordability, appraisal issues, tight credit and TRID." These issues all rose to the surface, and are the same issues facing many up-and-coming hot cities throughout the United States today.

Read the rest here.

Realtor.com pegs Denver as fourth-hottest housing market

The city ranked fourth on the list, after Vallejo, California, San Francisco and Dallas.

Excerpt:

"Spring has arrived early this year, at least in terms of the rapid decline in the age of inventory," Chief Economist Jonathan Smoke of realtor.com said in a statement. "Strong off-season demand powered new seasonal highs in prices and left us with a new low in available homes for sale. Potential sellers take note: This year is shaping up to favor you even more than last year."

Another indication of the continuing strength of buyer demand is that the median list price remains level at $250,000, which is a steep 9 percent higher than one year ago. If this figure holds by the end of the month, it would be a record for February. Buyers are also ramping up their search online: realtor.com saw the highest year-over-year increase in average views per listing since April 2015.

While nearly 425,000 new listings will have entered the market in February, there still aren't enough to meet buyer demand. In fact, the sharp double-digit decline in for-sale housing inventory observed since October is continuing.

Read the rest here.

Tnooz reports on Denver pitch event for travel startups

Four graduates of the Travelport Labs Accelerator presented their business plans at the event.

Excerpt:

Wolo entered the program as a B2C "online bucket list community" company, but pivoted at the halfway point to a B2B company aimed at leveraging the power of bucket lists to improve corporate rewards and incentives.

Founders Ray Collins and Mike Swisher had just left another large accelerator program in South America where the team was one of more than a hundred in the program.

Collins and Swisher initially were hesitant about joining the newer, smaller Travelport Labs accelerator. However, the pair quickly appreciated the dedicated coaching and mentors the Travelport Labs program provided. And they loved Denver so much so that the team has now decided to relocate and base their business in the city.

Read the rest here.

U.S. News & World Report pegs Denver second-best city to live

After topping the list in 2016, Denver was second to only Austin in 2017.

Excerpt:

To clarify a common misconception, Denver is not a mountain town. It actually takes at least an hour to drive to the Rockies. But there are some great places for recreating within a 30-minute drive of downtown, such as Red Rocks Park and Cherry Creek State Park.  

Some might say that Denver is experiencing a gold rush of a different color: green. After Colorado residents voted to legalize recreational marijuana in 2012, Denver has seen a surge in cannabis-related commerce, from dispensaries to magazines to high-tech paraphernalia like vaporizers, rolling papers, lotions and storage containers -- and the industry is just gaining speed. 

Read the rest here.

LinkedIn ranks Denver fourth in U.S. for worker migration

The LinkedIn Workforce Report ranked Denver after Seattle, Portland and Austin.

Excerpt:

Seattle, Portland, Austin, Denver, and Charlotte gained the most workers over the last 12 months. For every 10,000 LinkedIn members in Seattle, 68.2 workers moved to the city in the last year  -- mostly from San Francisco, Chicago, New York City, and Los Angeles.

Seattle, Portland, Austin, Denver, and Charlotte are all cities that have a lower cost of living than cities like New York and San Francisco, and have access to the great outdoors. This is a trend we’re keeping an eye on. 

Read the rest here.

Curbed probes lower rents in Denver

The prime reason for the drop: lots of new apartments.

Excerpt:

According to the new Denver Metro Area Apartment Vacancy and Rent Survey, published by the Apartment Association of Metro Denver, the city's average apartment rent fell from $1,371 in the third quarter to $1,347 in the fourth quarter. It was the largest quarterly drop in the 36 years that the study has been conducted.

In addition, vacancy rates -- which show the number of available apartments and can help illustrate affordability -- increased from 5.1 percent to 6.2 percent, which is a more "healthy" percentage.
 
How did Denver do it? A total of 9,962 new apartment units were built in the city during 2016, a record-breaking number.
"In 2010, only 498 new apartment units were built in the entire city. Fast forward to 2016 and we're seeing that same number being delivered every three weeks in Denver," said Teo Nicolais, a real estate expert and Harvard University professor quoted in the study. "That's the most apartments we've built during one year in Denver's entire history."

Read the rest here.

NY Times ponders "Peak Millennial" in Denver and other cities

The story wondered how much longer cities should focus on recruiting the generation.

Excerpt:

The flow of young professionals into Philadelphia has flattened, according to JLL Research, while apartment rents have started to soften in a number of big cities because of a glut of new construction geared toward urban newcomers who haven't arrived. Apartment rents in San Francisco, Washington, Denver, Miami and New York are moderating or even declining from a year ago, according to Zillow.

"Certainly the softening of rents is one sign that they are not coming in at the pace that people thought they would," said Diane Swonk, an independent economist in Chicago.

The debate is full of contours and caveats, but it really boils down to this: Are large numbers of millennials really so enamored with city living that they will age and raise families inside the urban core, or will many of them, like earlier generations, eventually head to the suburbs in search of bigger homes and better school districts?

Read the rest here.

Adelaide looks to Denver for lessons

An InDaily story looked at what economic lessons the capital of South Australia could learn from Colorado's capital city.

Excerpt:

In 2015, Denver was named as [most] liveable city in the west and the fourth-best metro area for science, technology, engineering and mathematics professionals in America. More than 38 per cent of Colorado's adult population has completed a bachelor's degree or higher. In 2015, Colorado was also ranked as the second-most entrepreneurial State in America.

Adelaide, like Denver, provides a very high quality of life, affordable housing, quality health care, a ready supply of commercial property for lease or purchase, friendly people, a well-educated work force, and many other attributes that mirror Denver's. Adelaide's countryside is very attractive, tourism is well targeted and events are significantly supported.

Adelaide Airport has improved quite dramatically since the 1990s. Adelaide Oval is a world class venue. So why hasn't Adelaide grown at anything like the very fast rate of Denver?

Read the rest here.

People profiles Feral founder

Jimmy Funkhouser of Denver's Feral Mountain Company was the subject of an "American Doers" video and profile in People magazine.

Excerpt:

It wasn't easy for 34-year-old Jimmy Funkhouser to leave his small hometown of Elberfeld, Indiana, and it was even harder to leave his nine younger siblings.

"It was hard. As the oldest, I’ve always had this sense of wanting to set an example," Funkhouser tells PEOPLE. "I think being the oldest naturally instills within you this nature of blazing a path."

This year, Funkhouser quit his 10-year corporate job, moved to Denver, Colorado and started on his mission for achieving his own American Dream -- opening a mountain gear shop.

Read the rest here.

Curbed names Wynkoop one of "10 streets that define America"

Wynkoop Street in LoDo has undergone a remarkable renaissance in the last 25 years.

Excerpt:

Jim Graeber notes that when he moved in two years later into his own loft down the street, "Union Station was a beautiful building, but it wasn't used much. Two Amtrak trains a day and the ski train, but that was it."

Loft conversions in the early 1990s spurred further development downtown. Joyce Meskis, owner of the independent bookstore the Tattered Cover, had dreamed of expanding her Cherry Creek-based operation with a satellite store, but couldn't afford the expensive real estate on the eastern side of town.

Wynkoop Street was less expensive, and offered her, she says, "the chance to be a part of the future of Denver." But even though the neighborhood showed promise, "in the early stage when we moved there [they first opened a warehouse in 1990 and then a store in 1994], there were more pigeon occupants than people occupants."

Read the rest here.

CBC contrasts Calgary and Denver

CBC Calgary took a hard look at the story behind Denver's resiliency during the recent energy bust.

Excerpt:

Denver and Calgary have a lot in common. But while Denver is rising, Calgary is struggling.

Founded within 20 years of each other, both cities were 19th century western frontiers. Places built on railways, agriculture and oil. For decades, both cities followed a similar economic path -- including the highs and lows of the energy industry.

But then, just a little more than 30 years ago, both cities faced a crisis. Calgary went one way, and is still riding the energy wave. Denver another, leading to a thriving economy. 

Calgary could stand to learn a thing or two from Denver. Something that occurred to Calgary Economic Development, which recently sent someone down on a fact-finding mission to study the successes of the Mile High City -- named for the exact mile it sits above sea level.

Read the rest here.

Bloomberg analyzes Denver housing market

It's gone from superheated to merely hot as year-over-year gains moderated slightly in 2016.

Excerpt:

The prices have gotten too heated for many buyers in Denver, which has seen a slowdown since the beginning of the year, said Wade Perry, a managing broker at Coldwell Banker Devonshire in the area.

"Buyers are starting to push back and say, 'I'm not going to pay that much for that house,'" Perry said.
 
The median home value in Denver rose 10 percent in August from a year earlier to $353,300, according to Zillow. While that's still one of the top increases in the country, it's down from an almost 16 percent surge in the same period of 2015.

Read the rest here.

Florida startup Cuttlesoft expands to Denver

Standout software developer and IT services firm Cuttlesoft picked Denver over Raleigh for its second office, reported the Tallahassee Democrat.

Excerpt:

Cuttlesoft's name is a mashup of cuttlefish, the startup's logo and inspiration as an adaptable animal, and software, the startup's bread and butter. In less than two years, Valcarcel and Morehouse have worked side by side building a tech-based company specializing in IT and software services, consulting, auditing and web applications for its growing list of clients.

. . .

Now they'e preparing to work in dual time zones as it opens a second office in lower downtown Denver. The company -- the Tallahassee Chamber of Commerce's 2016 Startup of the Year -- wanted to expand to a market with a robust tech presence. The finalists? Denver and Raleigh, North Carolina.

. . .

"We wouldn’t be there or growing and expanding our business in both places if we hadn’t gotten started here," Valcarcel said. "If we had moved to Silicon Valley … I don’t think we would have had the capital to break ground."

Read the rest here.

Daily Breeze reports on Toastmasters proposed move to Denver

The Daily Breeze looked at Toastmasters International's proposed move to Denver, and the fight to keep the nonprofit's headquarters in Torrance, California.

Excerpt:

"You hear about big companies moving out of California, especially to Texas," Chao said. "We have a couple of clients that have moved to Colorado. The even bigger driver is they can get into the housing market there. Prices are more affordable, and the real estate tax is less. And once they go there they realized they had a lower tax burden."

For companies, taxes are much lower in Colorado than in California. Colorado companies pay 4.63 percent of their company’s net income. California companies pay 8.84 percent, but also have a minimum amount they pay in taxes.

Nonprofits generally don’t pay taxes, Chao said. So moving to Colorado from Orange County would not offer any tax benefit to a group like Toastmasters, even though it may do so for individuals.

Read the rest here.

 
102 Move to Denver Articles | Page: | Show All
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