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127 Craft Manufacturing Articles | Page: | Show All

Builder mag showcases Denver construction coworking space

The story looked at the innovative model of Tradecraft Industries in north Denver.

Excerpt:

Tradecraft Industries founder Bryce Ballew envisioned a shared office space where building pros can network and build relationships with others in similar trades. Memberships are offered for private and flex offices, mailing addresses, and storage units. Other features include conference rooms, continuing education programs, and estimating rooms.

Read the rest here.

AP story delves into the history and present of Five Points, Denver's "Harlem of the West"

The Associated Press story looked at the rich legacy of jazz, African-American history and the neighborhood's modern-day boom.

Excerpt:
 
Denver's Five Points isn't the only historically black enclave changed by population shifts and revitalization. In New York, neighborhoods like Harlem and Brooklyn's Fort Greene have lost black residents as rents have risen. Seminal black-owned landmarks, like Harlem's Lenox Lounge, have shuttered. Activists in Houston's Freeman's Town have worked to prevent brick streets laid by former slaves from being uprooted despite development pressures.

On the other hand, some of Five Points' new businesses are opening in storefronts that have long sat empty, and they're making an effort to recognize the neighborhood's roots.

The 715 Club, founded by the son of a Pullman porter at the corner of Welton and 26th, had been closed for years before a 2016 reopening. "We are a neighborhood bar in the heart of 5 Points trying to preserve a piece of Welton history," the new owners say on their Facebook page.

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Christian Science Monitor reports on GrowHaus

Christian Science Monitor covered The GrowHaus, a nonprofit indoor farm in Elyria-Swansea.

Excerpt:

"How can we say that we have this amazing, healthy city, and boast our outdoors life, but we have these communities that don’t have access to healthy food?" says Coby Gould, executive director and cofounder of The GrowHaus. "We are a food-based organization, but ultimately we’re a community development organization -- and we use food as the tool, food as the lens."

The GrowHaus is based in a rehabbed, 20,000-square-foot space that was formerly a flower distribution center. It's surrounded by factories, highways, and rail lines, and the whistle of a freight train interrupted Mr. Gould's comments.

Read the rest here.

Fox News spotlights Denver women brewers making a statement

"Makin Noise: A Pussy Riot Beer" was first produced in December at Goldspot Brewing.

Excerpt:

Female brewers in Denver, Colo. are taking a stand against oppression, sexism and anti-LGBT sentiments by collaborating to produce a series of craft brews that will be released leading up to president-elect Donald Trump's inauguration later this month. 

The first batch of "Makin Noise: A Pussy Riot Beer" was produced on Dec. 28 at Goldspot Brewing. Kelissa Hieber, Goldspot's head brewer and one of the group's key organizers, told FoxNews.com that the goal of the project isn't about promoting anti-Trumpism (though she admitted to Westword that many felt "defeated" and "helpless" after the election) but rather to foster unity among likeminded individuals and beer lovers.

"Despite a kneejerk reaction to assume that an inauguration day release insinuates a protest to Trump, however our only desire for this beer to to insight a larger sense of community and to stand up against injustice," Hieber said.

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NY Times explores real estate in RiNo

RiNo's development boom was the subject of a recent story in the New York Times.

Excerpt:

Among the unconventional work spaces and restaurants in the district, known as RiNo and north of downtown, is Comal, a lunch spot with Latin American cuisine where women from low-income backgrounds are learning how to run a business. In RiNo's recently opened Denver Central Market, shoppers can grab a sandwich, coffee or fresh fish,or sit at a bar and take in the scene.

The neighborhood has attracted artists who helped gentrify the old and neglected industrial expanse, which in its dilapidated condition was long considered the back door into downtown from westbound I-70.

Business promoters now want to create an international trade hub in the district and are ready to capitalize on what they see as one of Denver's last development frontiers. The developer Sean Campbell and World Trade Center Denver, a nonprofit organization that helps regional businesses, have proposed building a $200 million international business campus in RiNo.

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Lonely Planet pegs Denver among 10 best U.S. destinations for 2017

The city was ranked no. 9 on the travel publisher's annual list for its sunshine, beer, access to skiing and hip neighborhoods.

Excerpt:
 
Home of the bearded and the buff, Denver's aspen-tinged allure has never been greater. The secret is out: ample sunshine, a brewery on every corner and an endless supply of adrenaline-firing fun are fuelling the Rocky Mountain rush. And those lofty alpine summits aren't the only highs in town -- revamped Union Station is at the heart of new developments like the Ski Train, which in 2017 will whisk skiers direct from downtown to Winter Park's powdery bliss. Throw a vibrant economy into the mix, and you get artsy districts like RiNo (River North) and LoHi (Lower Highlands), where you can replenish your calories in slow-food market halls, bookended by gallery hopping and a night out with some rootsy, denim-clad rockers.

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Zagat tabs Denver as no. 3 food city in U.S.

Only Washington, D.C., and Los Angeles topped Denver on the 25-city list.

Excerpt:

The best city for singles. For millennials. For entrepreneurs. For outdoorspeople. Over the past few years, Denver has ranked at or near the top of virtually every U.S. index there is; it was only a matter of time before outsiders "discovered" its dynamic dining scene too. This year alone, Nobu MatsuhisaGregory GourdetDeborah Schneider and Hugh Acheson staked claims here; Jeffrey Wall of Atlanta's Kimball House is on his way, and so is the team behind New York's Death & Co.

Meanwhile, there's no stopping our homegrown talent. Beard award-winners Bobby Stuckey and Lachlan Mackinnon-Patterson (Frasca) will be opening Tavernetta soon; fellow recipient Jennifer Jasinski (Rioja et al.) is expanding her mini empire with Ultreia. 

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Chicago Tribune explores Denver food markets

The story looked at The Source, Avanti, Union Station and Central Market, as well as Aurora's Stanley Marketplace.

Excerpt:

Ask anyone who has lived for at least a few years in this gateway to the Rocky Mountains, and they'll say Denver has changed.

It's younger and edgier, and it bubbles with an energy wholly absent when the city was "nothing but a big ol' cow town in the early '80s," as one local said. Like most places, the change is principally seen in rising home prices (bad!) and a blossoming food and drink scene (good!).
 
But the food and drink explosion has come in one particularly broad and curious form: the food market.

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Soulciti covers Denver-based Ed Dwight's black history memorial in Austin

The sculptor's massive monument is being installed on the grounds of the Texas State Capitol.

Excerpt:

By all accounts, the 32-foot-long and 27-foot-high monument -- crafted by master sculptor Ed Dwight of Denver, CO -- is both massive and magnificent. From a north-facing distance, its high point parallels the Capitol's peak, and it sits across from a statue that honors Confederate states and the dates that they seceded from the Union during the Civil War.

"What I did is, I told the whole story of Texas from the beginning with all the visual details of it. I matched the stories with the visuals. And the story is all laid out for you," says Dwight, who has created statues and memorials around the U.S. and in Canada. "We've got an African American explorer exploring Texas in the 1500s, and we've got a Black astronaut from Texas exploring space. And all my stories have happy endings."

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Travelocity names Denver second-best beer destination

Portland topped the list; Denver was ahead of no. 3 Seattle.

Excerpt:

Last year, in a Travelocity survey of 1,003 people, more than three-quarters of those surveyed said they would like to go on a trip where they visited craft breweries and sampled local beer. Recognizing this interest in beer tourism, Travelocity enlisted the expertise of the Brewers Association, a national trade association dedicated to promoting American craft brewers, their beers and the community of brewing enthusiasts, to find America’s best beer destinations by creating the first Beer Tourism Index.



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NY Times looks at expansion plans of Denver-based Dixie Brands

With marijuana legalized in numerous states, Dixie Brands is eyeing a tricky strategy to grow in new markets, reports The New York Times.

Excerpt:

Almost all small-business owners dream of the day when they can expand nationally. This has proved to be a unique challenge for those in the marijuana industry because the products they create are illegal under federal law, and the checkerboard of states that permit marijuana sales have complex and constantly changing regulations.

Dixie Brands, a company in Denver that creates drinks and other products using marijuana, is aiming to navigate those hurdles and become one of the first companies in the industry to build a national presence.

Voters on Tuesday brought that dream a little closer to reality. California, Massachusetts, Maine and Nevada approved adult-use (a new term for recreational use) marijuana. Florida, Arkansas, North Dakota and Montana voted to legalize or expand medical marijuana use. Twenty-eight states and the District of Columbia now have some sort of allowed use.

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Men's Journal details "World's Best Brewery Crawl" in Denver

The route includes pints at Wynkoop, Great Divide and Spangalang.

Excerpt:

If you're a true fan of better beer, upgrade the suds-soaked adventure that is the bar crawl to a brewery crawl. At every stop you'll get to meet the men and women behind the pint in your hand, and those ales and lagers will never be fresher than when they're served a few feet from where they're brewed. Sadly, not many cities have the proper density of breweries to pull off a proper crawl, but among the lucky few, Denver reigns supreme.

In this three-mile stretch across downtown Denver, there are an astounding 18 breweries (including a cidery). Naturally, we don't recommend hitting every spot in one day. But with a little prudent sampling, you can hit the high notes in one long-distance stroll. Each leg of our crawl takes about a 15-minute walk to the next watering hole, though Uber is abundant across the city.

Read the rest here.

Curbed names Wynkoop one of "10 streets that define America"

Wynkoop Street in LoDo has undergone a remarkable renaissance in the last 25 years.

Excerpt:

Jim Graeber notes that when he moved in two years later into his own loft down the street, "Union Station was a beautiful building, but it wasn't used much. Two Amtrak trains a day and the ski train, but that was it."

Loft conversions in the early 1990s spurred further development downtown. Joyce Meskis, owner of the independent bookstore the Tattered Cover, had dreamed of expanding her Cherry Creek-based operation with a satellite store, but couldn't afford the expensive real estate on the eastern side of town.

Wynkoop Street was less expensive, and offered her, she says, "the chance to be a part of the future of Denver." But even though the neighborhood showed promise, "in the early stage when we moved there [they first opened a warehouse in 1990 and then a store in 1994], there were more pigeon occupants than people occupants."

Read the rest here.

CBC contrasts Calgary and Denver

CBC Calgary took a hard look at the story behind Denver's resiliency during the recent energy bust.

Excerpt:

Denver and Calgary have a lot in common. But while Denver is rising, Calgary is struggling.

Founded within 20 years of each other, both cities were 19th century western frontiers. Places built on railways, agriculture and oil. For decades, both cities followed a similar economic path -- including the highs and lows of the energy industry.

But then, just a little more than 30 years ago, both cities faced a crisis. Calgary went one way, and is still riding the energy wave. Denver another, leading to a thriving economy. 

Calgary could stand to learn a thing or two from Denver. Something that occurred to Calgary Economic Development, which recently sent someone down on a fact-finding mission to study the successes of the Mile High City -- named for the exact mile it sits above sea level.

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CNBC spotlights most popular brews at GABF

The cable network looked at the breweries with the longest lines at the largest beer festival in the U.S., including Denver's Black Project.

Excerpt:

There are two types of winners at the Great American Beer Festival: Those that walk away with one of the coveted medals from the show's judges and those that claim an unofficial people's choice award. 

The two often intersect, but it's not a sure thing. Yet in the two days before the awards are announced at the country's premier beer festival, beer lovers roam the hall, which is roughly the size of seven football fields and hosts roughly 800 brewers, sharing notes and rushing to try offerings with the strongest word-of-mouth buzz.

Some of the brewers that regularly have lines of 50 or more people are already iconic names in the craft beer world. Russian River Brewing (maker of the eternally popular Pliny the Elder) and Avery Brewing (whose Callipygian has been especially in demand at this year's show), for instance, regularly see people wait patiently for a 1-ounce sample of their products, only to walk to the back of the line and wait again for another.

Read the rest here.
127 Craft Manufacturing Articles | Page: | Show All
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