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ULC's Tony Pickett offers housing lessons to Oregon's Metro

Tony Pickett of Denver's Urban Land Conservancy recently spoke about affordability and equity in Portland.

Excerpt:

The Urban Land Conservancy, where Pickett has worked since 2013, has even more opportunity to create affordability in the Mile-High City. Started with a $15 million seed fund, the organization has grown over time to invest $70 million in 28 projects, generating over $400 million in redevelopment.

One of the conservancy's advantages has been the ability to move quickly to purchase prime sites as Denver undergoes a multi-billion dollar expansion of its rail transit system.

Pickett shared the example of the conservancy's Park Hill Village West development, on Denver's new A-Line commuter rail connecting downtown to Denver International Airport. Urban Land Conservancy purchased the site close to a planned station in a historically black neighborhood to create permanently affordable housing with easy access to the region's growing transit network. The development opened at about the same time as the rail line.

Read the rest here.

High Times picks its favorite munchies in Denver

The cannabis-friendly magazine chose 10 of its favorite post-smoke eateries in the city.

Excerpt:

Since legalization of cannabis in Denver, Colorado, the urban landscape has experienced a surge of marijuana enthusiasts and medical refugees alike looking to make a home in the Mile High City. Abandoned properties once stuck motionless in a state of decay have been revived by grow operations and newly legal businesses. What was once derelict has been brought back to life, breathing energy into the city streets.
 
Taking part in a cultural revolution can cause one to work up an appetite, so as one of those marijuana enthusiasts new to Denver, you might be asking yourself, "Where are the best places to eat while stoned?"

Well, we're here to help you find the best munchie fixes in the city with expert recommendations from a top cannabis chef, complete with pairing tips for primo pot strains  -- so get ready to blaze before stepping foot into one of these fine establishments!

Read the rest here.

TimeOut calls Denver fifth-best city lo live in the U.S.

Denver ranked on the list high due to its parks, proximity to the Rockies, transit, music and beer -- plus legal marijuana.

Excerpt:

Denver is one of the fastest-growing cities in the nation, boasting 83,000 new residents since 2010. Educated millennials lead the charge, drawn to Denver's cool music scene, dozens of breweries, public transportation network -- including bike share -- and, in some cases, the legalization of marijuana in Colorado. 

Read the rest here.

Telegraph asks: "Is Denver becoming America's coolest city?"

The British newspaper peered into the city in a travel feature and came away with an appreciation for its beer, art and most everything else.

Excerpt:

The first permanent building in Denver wasn’t a church, a home or a bank; it was a saloon. Now, more than 150 years after gold prospectors first began to arrive, Denverites still clearly love their beer.

. . .

Simply strolling or cycling around the city (Denverites love bikes as much as they love beer) gives you an idea of the remarkable amount of choice here for hop-heads. There’s a German brewery (Prost Brewing Company), an English brewery (Hogshead), a hippy brewery (Vine Street Pub & Brewery), and even a heavy metal brewery (TRVE Brewing Company). For the truly thirsty, you can seamlessly link many of the best establishments together, on foot or bike, via the popular Denver Beer Trail, with free downloadable maps. The Denver Beer Fest, a nine-day gala of local brews held in the autumn, is an enjoyable way to tap into the scene, and the Great American Beer Festival, following swiftly behind, showcases more than 3,000 beers from across the USA at Denver’s Colorado Convention Center.

But it's not all about pints and pitchers: Denver as a whole is very much on the up. The second fastest growing city in the country after Austin, it’s also chasing down the Texan capital in the cool stakes too. A magnet for young professionals, the active and outdoorsy, it’s one of the youngest cities in the US too, with a median population age of just 34. 

Read the rest here.

Next City spotlights workforce development in Denver

Next City reported on the decentralization and expansion of workforce development by the Denver Office of Economic Development.

Excerpt:

Before this year, there weren't many spots in Denver where an unemployed person could get help stepping back into the job stream. A small cluster of employment service centers were huddled in the heart of the city, but most of its 11 districts were largely unserved.

Now that the Office of Economic Development (OED) has decided to divide Denver's job training programs out to private contractors, the number of government-funded work and economic assistance centers will jump seven-fold, going from seven to nearly 50 and spanning across all 11 districts instead of only five.

"People can access these services where they're comfortable instead of traveling [into downtown]," says Denise Bryant, director of the OED's workforce development program. "We have contractors and subcontractors that are now actually in the community."

Read the rest here.

Denver videographer wins Murrow award for "The Motel Life"

KUSA Denver's Corky Scholl won a Edward R. Murrow award for his 2015 short documentary on the people living in motels as "a last resort" in Denver, entitled "The Motel Life," reported the National Press Photographers Association.


Video:




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Streetsblog's Talking Headways Podcast talks Denver transportation

Streetsblog's Talking Headways Podcast covered Denver transportation issues as the I-70 expansion, the A Line and Colfax Avenue.

Listen:

 

Read the rest here.

Two Denver venues make "100 Greatest American Music Venues" list

Consequence of Sound named a pair of Denver-area stages to its list of the top 100 music venues in the U.S.: the Bluebird and Red Rocks.

Excerpt:

Denver has its fair share of great music venues -- you'll find another way, way up this list -- but even in a crowded field, the Bluebird Theater stands out. Part of that is its many contradictions, from the twee name for a venue that feels anything but to the vintage architecture and retro marquee that houses a top-notch sound system. But best of all, audiences who flock to see alt-country stalwarts or Guns N' Roses tributes get to embrace the rock-and-roll ethos that comes with a general-admission policy, without worrying that they're not going to be able to see a damned thing.

Read the rest here.

 

Charlotte Observer calls Denver "the future of transit"

The Charlotte Observer ran a story focused on regional collaboration that painted Denver as a transit model for other cities.

Excerpt:

The Denver area has a long history of regionalism, in part due to necessity: The region makes up a majority of the state's population and tax receipts, so there's no other game in town, so to speak. The transit system has been run by a regional entity that covers multiple counties since its inception.

But that doesn't mean cooperation has always come easily. In 1997, the first attempt at a ballot measure for a regional sales tax increase to pay for an expanded system went down 57 to 43 percent.

"People say, did you all wake up one morning and decide to cooperate? We didn't," said Maria Garcia Berry of CRL Associates, a public policy firm that helped craft the successful 2004 ballot campaign.

Read the rest here.

Society of Commercial Archaeology highlights endangered Colfax neon

The Society of Commercial Archaeology placed Colfax Avenue's neon signs on its 2016 "Falling by the Wayside" list of endangered landmarks.

Excerpt:

The neon signs on Colfax Avenue face several threats. First, as the Colfax Avenue corridor reawakens, there is pressure for redevelopment of the corridor. Abandoned properties along the corridor are often razed, along with their neon signs. Second, the high-quality materials that were used to make the signs originally make them expensive to maintain today, and it is often cheaper to replace the signs rather than repair them. Lastly, as new businesses open in existing buildings, many signs are demolished for signs for the new business. The threats to the signs on Colfax Avenue led Colorado Preservation, Inc., to place the signs in their 2014 Most Endangered Places Program.

Read the rest here.

Storage.com blogs about "Best Denver Neighborhoods for Young Professionals"

Storage.com published a post on the "3 Best Denver Neighborhoods for Young Professionals."

Excerpt:

If you want to live in an area with plenty to do but prefer not to deal with the noise, traffic, and parking challenges, Platt Park could be a great option for you. In addition, if you’d rather buy instead of rent, Platt Park is a relatively affordable option compared to many of the alternatives in Denver. Though this probably won't be a possibility for a recent college graduate, there is the opportunity to buy for young professionals who have had a little time to get established.

Read the rest here.

PeopleForBikes names Arapahoe Street one of 10 best new bike lanes

Bicycling advocacy group PeopleForBikes pegged the protected lane on Arapahoe Street downtown as one of "America's 10 best new bike lanes for 2015."

Excerpt:

If only these plastic posts could talk. This one-mile project was languishing as a line on a map until the Downtown Denver Partnership business advocacy group, inspired by a trip to Copenhagen and a wave of demand for better biking among downtown tech firms, rallied public support by creating a one-day demo and leading a successful crowfunding campaign that kicked off with an anchor donation from oil company Anadarko, among others.

The $36,000 raised through Ioby.org convinced Denver leaders that the public had their back. With their green light, city staff threw themselves into Arapahoe and its couplet street with a passion, rethought their bidding process and cut the ribbon this month, less than a year after approval. Like Queens Boulevard, it's a national model for quick-build street projects.

Read the rest here.

Inc. spotlights 10 fastest-growing companies in Denver

Inc. published a piece on Denver's fastest-growing companies from its annual Inc. 500 list.

Excerpt:

10. Tender Belly

At No. 698, this company is bringing home the bacon -- in more ways than one. A specialty pork seller, Tender Belly has a 2014 revenue of $4.3 million and a three-year growth rate of 649 percent. Co-founder Shannon Duffy credits a foodie culture in Denver for Tender Belly's success. "I think that one of the reasons it blossomed out here is that people appreciate more good stuff, and less crap," he says.

Read the rest here.

Fodor's names Pinche Tacos one of "10 Best Taco Spots"

Fodor's Travel named Denver's Pinche Tacos one of "10 Best Taco Spots in the U.S."

Excerpt:

"Tacos. Tequila. Whiskey." The sign outside Pinche Tacos is intentionally coy because of the disputed political correctness of its name, but otherwise, owner Kevin Morrison doesn’t beat around the bush and serves up classic tacos that don’t go overboard with unusual ingredients.

Read the rest here.

Mad Genius Radio boss makes music predictions at Hypebot.com

Eric Neumann, CEO of Denver-based Mad Genius Radio, unpacked his music predictions for 2015 at Hypebot.com.

Excerpt:

1. The RESPECT Act will be reintroduced in Congress early 2015
Currently, pre-1972 audio recordings are not covered under federal copyright law and, therefore, are not subject to receiving royalty payments. The RESPECT Act would mend this issue and enable all digital performances of songs -- regardless of the year they were recorded -- to become eligible for royalties. While Sirius and Pandora have both opposed the RESPECT Act, I wonder what Diana Ross, Robert Plant and Paul McCartney think about receiving compensation they’ve been due for quite some time.

Read the rest here.
27 Uptown Articles | Page: | Show All
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