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NPR wonders if Denver is at the center of "The Silicon Valley of Agriculture"

NPR took a look at innovation and growth in Colorado's food industry.

Excerpt:

New neighborhoods in Denver and other Northern Colorado cities are being structured around gardens, small farms and food hubs, taking the local food movement to a scale where it's actually having a measurable effect on the city's economy.

"We're seeing this industry grow exponentially in Denver," said the city's mayor Michael Hancock. "Small businesses are going into incubators and they're coming out as stronger businesses ready to contribute to the marketplace."

Denver's also home to some of the biggest players in food processing, hosting headquarters for the largest maker of mozzarella cheese in the world, Leprino Foods, and the country's biggest flour milling company, Ardent Mills

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ArtSlant profiles Denver scene

ArtSlant delved into Denver's art galleries.

Excerpt:

In this growing scene, energy is ebullient, artwork is edgy, curators are risk takers, and the openings are impressively populated. However, this grassrootsy-ness, though delightful, tends to go hand-in-hand with a pervasive unchecked-ness in which the energy for arts and artists overflows the current infrastructure of support that promotes, challenges, and ultimately propels artists forward. This is evidenced, for example, by the widespread presence of artist cooperatives. There are many advantages to the artist co-op model, and there are benefits for artists. However, the disadvantage of having so many is that art is made and shown out of pace with the other necessary factors of support: criticism, curation, consumption.

Despite these criticisms, Denver-as-creative-hub is certainly on the rise. There are emerging galleries and art districts, as well as well-established venues offering up valuable exhibitions and access to the incredible talent of local, regional, national, and international artists. 

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CityLab story on bicycling and social equity features Denver councilman Albus Brooks

CityLab story on bicycling and social equity featured Denver City Councilman Albus Brooks.

Excerpt:

In an interview with Albus Brooks, a Denver city councilman who rides his bike for the sheer joy it brings him, the report touches on these complexities and stereotypes. Brooks tells the story of going to a meeting with African-American leaders in the city. "I came in in a suit and a bike helmet," Brooks is quoted as saying. "These were all middle-class African Americans that do not ride bikes. And they looked at me as if I were an alien." Brooks goes on to say he hopes that by opening streets for special bike events, he can introduce these same people to the health and economic benefits of biking. "We're going to go on cultural rides where we block off a couple miles of streets and try to introduce to leaders in the community what bike infrastructure is all about."

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DAM goes free for kids, reports ARTnews

The Denver Art Museum is going to be free for kids 18 and younger, reported ARTnews.

Excerpt:

Today the Denver Art Museum announced that it will no longer charge admission to its collection galleries for visitors 18 years old and under, joining a number of museums that in recent years have eliminated fees for various segments of their audiences. The museum currently charges $5 for youth who are 6 to 18 ($3 for Colorado residents), while children 5 and younger are free. The new program, called Free for Kids, will be in effect for the next five years, and is funded by a gift from Scott Reiman, the Reiman Foundation, and Kaiser Permanente Colorado. (Some special exhibitions will still require paying, but the maximum ticket price for the youth will be $5.)

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Forbes gives Crawford Hotel a test drive

Forbes reviewed The Crawford Hotel at Union Station in Lower Downtown Denver -- and raved about it.

Excerpt:

To put it  simply, the Crawford is the coolest new hotel I have visited in a long time. It breaks the urban mold.

The hotel opened last July as part of a total renovation of historic Union Station in the heart of Downtown. This capped a 20-year process of massive upgrades to the neighborhood that have made Denver the foremost example of downtown urban revival in the entire country. The investment in infrastructure has been staggering, starting with Coors Field, home of the Colorado Rockies, within walking distance of the hotel. Also close at hand are NHL, NBA and NFL arenas. Across the street is Denver’s first microbrewery – the first of many, now a signature of the city.

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Co.EXIST spotlights open-source urban ag startup in Denver

Fast Company's Co.EXIST highlighted Aker, an open-source urban agriculture startup in Denver.

Excerpt:

Another example of the trend: a new Denver-based company called Aker (pronounced "acre"). Aker has six new designs for urban agriculture products, including a two-hen chicken coop, a raised planter bed, and a multi-story worm hotel, and it's prepared to give them away for free so people can develop their own versions. You can download the blueprints from the Aker website, cut your own pieces of wood using a CNC routing machine, and assemble yourself, just as if it were an IKEA product. It won't cost you much more than the price of plywood.

Cofounder Tristan Copley Smith says he wants to spread access to homesteading equipment so more people can raise their own food and live more healthily. "There's a growing interest out there with people wanting to get back to the land," he says.

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VentureBeat reports on Amazon acquisition of Denver startup

VentureBeat covered Amazon's acquisition of Denver-based 2lemetry.

Excerpt:

Amazon.com has acquired 2lemetry, a startup with a system for sending, receiving, and analyzing data from Internet-connected devices.

"We can confirm that Amazon has acquired 2lemetry, and we look forward to continuing to support 2lemetry customers," an Amazon Web Services spokeswoman told VentureBeat in an email. She would not tell VentureBeat how the team or technology would be integrated into Amazon.

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International Business Times calls DIA restaurants 'world-class'

International Business Times named Denver International Airport to a list of 'world-class' airports for foodies.

Excerpt:

Visiting the Rocky Mountain City for various, er, uh, recreational activities can build up your appetite. Luckily, before you head out of town, you can grab anything from a burger to a bento box from Denver's legendary Root Down airport outpost or get healthy, fresh sandwiches from Udi's Cafe, another local staple.

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Geology Page reports on new theory behind Denver's mile-high elevation

Geology Page reported on a new theory that Denver's mile-high elevation is a result of a flood below.

Excerpt:

No one really knows how the High Plains got so high. About 70 million years ago, eastern Colorado, southeastern Wyoming, western Kansas and western Nebraska were near sea level. Since then, the region has risen about 2 kilometers, leading to some head scratching at geology conferences.

Now researchers at the Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences (CIRES) and the Department of Geological Sciences at the University of Colorado Boulder have proposed a new way to explain the uplift: Water trapped deep below Earth's crust may have flooded the lower crust, creating buoyancy and lift. The research appears online this week in the journal Geology and could represent a new mechanism for elevating broad regions of continental crust.

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WSJ delves into "My Teenage Angst" in Denver

The Wall Street Journal covered "My Teenage Angst," a storytelling night in Denver where participants read from the diaries they kept as adolescents.

Excerpt:

Jon Olsen, a 40-year-old writer, is among the dozens of Denverites who participate in "My Teenage Angst." His go-to entries usually focus on a girl he once pined for -- the feelings weren't mutual -- and his chronicling of every mundane interaction he had with her.

One entry he is considering reading was from his freshman year at Humboldt State University in California.

"I had written this long and uncharacteristically honest sort of diatribe about how mortified I felt about being sexually inactive," he says. "I was so horrified about it that it was scribbled over in a different color and I had turned it into this weird drawing of some leering creature -- maybe a demon or dragon."

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Endless Vacation names DBG to top 10 gardens list

Endless Vacation named Denver Botanic Gardens to a list of the world's top 10 botanic gardens.

Excerpt:

Colorado's dry climate is on spectacular display at the Denver Botanic Gardens, which are split between three locations: the main, 24-acre York Street enclosure; the larger Chatfield meadow and historic homestead; and the Mount Goliath alpine-wildflower garden. Exhibitions change with the seasons (one focused on Dale Chihuly was on view most recently), and the 5,258-square-foot Science Pyramid learning center just opened.

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Denver chef pens op-ed on sustainable seafood for L.A. Times

Kelly Whitaker, chef of Cart-Driver in RiNo, wrote an op-ed for the Los Angeles Times about the role of consumer demand in sustainable seafood.

Excerpt:

Today, virtually all West Coast groundfish are classified as "sustainable" seafood choices by the Monterey Bay Aquarium's Seafood Watch or the Marine Stewardship Council. So what's the problem?

While the fishery may have recovered environmentally, it hasn't economically. Groundfish are distinctly undervalued, sometimes fetching well below $1 a pound at the dock. Quotas for certain species go unharvested because the demand is not yet strong enough. The fishermen need help from chefs and consumers to gain more market traction.

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Louisville Courier-Journal covers Connor Wood Bicycles

The Louisville Courier-Journal reported on Denver's Connor Wood Bicycles, in Kentucky for the North American Handmade Bicycle Show.

Excerpt:

Louisville's own Louisville Slugger has partnered with Connor Wood Bicycles and created a bicycle made from the white ash wood billets used for Slugger baseball bats.

Chris Connor built the Louisville Slugger bike in his Denver, Colorado workshop. Connor Wood Bicycles are known for their beauty, amazing ride and strength of their wood. American white ash wood, traditionally used in the Louisville Slugger bats, is known for both its strength and striking capability. After constructing the bike, Connor sent it to Louisville where it was branded in the Slugger bat factory.

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Investopedia calls Denver "best city to become an entrepreneur"

Investopedia called Denver "best city to become an entrepreneur," along with Austin, Arlington, Va., and Oklahoma City.

Excerpt:

Denver is rife with resources for budding entrepreneurs. The University of Colorado houses the Jake Jabs Center for Entrepreneurship to foster new startups in the local community. As part of the city’s attractive financing options, Denver provides up to 50% of a project’s costs for ventures established in certain parts of the city. Additionally, Colorado offers cash incentives to eligible businesses that create permanent jobs that last at least a year.

Business costs are below the national average and the city enjoys a young population and low unemployment. Denver currently maintains 172 small businesses per 10,000 people.

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Nation's Restaurant News names Punch Bowl Social one of "2015 Breakout Brands"

Nation's Restaurant News put Punch Bowl Social on its list of 10 "2015 Breakout Brands" for restaurant chains.

Excerpt:

Punch Bowl Social's founder said the brand connects with Millennials who seek an energetic, playful atmosphere but aren't willing to sacrifice food quality. Locations feature a full menu of updated comfort foods as well as a bowling alley, shuffleboard, retro video games, and private karaoke rooms. Six new locations will open in the next 21 months, including two in Chicago, one in Cleveland and a second location in Denver.

Read the rest here.
653 Articles | Page: | Show All
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