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Travel + Leisure includes Denver in "Best Places to Travel in 2016"

Travel + Leisure put Denver at no. 23 in its "Best Places to Travel in 2016" feature, smack dab between Zanzibar and India's Andaman Islands.

Excerpt:

Denver may be surrounded by the snowy peaks of the Rocky Mountains, but these days the city attracts a lot more than skiers and snowboarders. Art and design are at the heart of everything in the Mile High City lately -- the 165-room Art Hotel has opened next to the Denver Art Museum, the Children's Museum is reopen after a $16.1 million expansion, and the Kirkland Museum of Fine & Decorative Art will debut a new space next year. Even at the new Westin Denver International Airport, there's plenty of eye candy.

Read the rest here.

 

Washington Monthly analyzes growth in Denver and other capital cities

Washington Monthly published an analysis of growth in Denver and other state capitals.

Excerpt:

The cities that made the Forbes list were not very surprising. They were more or less the same names you'll find on similar "hot cities" lists published by other media outlets, such as Bloomberg and Money magazine: Houston, Raleigh, Denver, Phoenix, Salt Lake City, Nashville, and so on.

Like other publications, Forbes took a stab at trying to explain why certain cities made it onto their list. It noted that the fracking-based oil and gas boom helped put five Texas cities in the top twenty, while thriving tech sectors explained why Seattle and the three California cities made the cut.

One commonality, however, that the editors of Forbes apparently did not notice is that more than a third of the cities on their list are state capitals (see Table 1). This was not a one-time lapse: cities that are home to their state's governments have been overrepresented on Forbes's and other media-generated lists for years, without, as far as I can tell, any of these publications ever mentioning the fact. The stories that accompany these lists typically include quotes from economists and economic development experts who try to make sense of the numbers. Factors such as tax rates, regulatory burdens, region, education levels, venture capital investment, housing prices, the existence of top-tier universities, proximity to seashores and mountains, and the percentage of workers who are in "creative" fields are usually discussed. But the idea that being home to a state's politicians, lobbyists, bureaucrats, and tens of billions of dollars in tax revenues might give a city a significant advantage in garnering wider economic growth seems to be not widely held, nor even considered.

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WSJ talks to MM Local about scaling food startups

The Wall Street Journal talked to Denver's MM Local in a story about growing pains for artisanal food startups.

Excerpt:

For many food makers, the solution is simply time. Ben Mustin, co-founder of MM Local Foods in Denver, spent three years getting farmers to agree to ongoing contracts with him for produce. He also worked with both farmers' market customers and retailers like Whole Foods and Lucky's Market to accept seasonal shifts in inventory.

"It took a while, but eventually we got customers to be OK with the fact that when the peaches are gone, they're gone, but maybe we have tomatoes now, or green beans or pears," Mr. Mustin says. "Now it's more of a positive thing, and sometimes even a selling point, where customers want to make sure to get the peaches while they can, and then they look forward to seeing what comes next, too."

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Denver a model for arts taxes in West, reports Christian Science Monitor

Denver is a model city for arts-supporting taxes in the West, according to a story in the Christian Science Monitor.

Excerpt:

By going to the polls to create a tax for the arts, metropolitan Denver sparked imaginations across the West. Voters in Denver and surrounding counties in 1989 approved a sales tax of a tenth of 1 percent, or a penny on every $10 spent, to support museums, theaters, dance companies, and institutions such as the zoo. 

It's "public patronage of the arts," says Peg Long, director of the Scientific & Cultural Facilities District (SCFD), which oversees fund distribution.

State and federal budgets have regularly cut arts funding during tough times. But in a reverse trend, voters in several Western states are slowly following Denver's lead by committing to a small arts tax that continues to yield big results.

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NY Times explains "why people actually like" DIA

The New York Times tackled "why people actually like Denver International Airport" in a Q&A with CEO Kim Day.

Excerpt:

Airports are an inevitable part of the lives of most travelers. But few would say that they have a passion for them. Kim Day, the chief executive of Denver International Airport, is an exception. In a previous life, Ms. Day, 61, was an architect, and she says that shaped her career running airports. “I see the world, and airports, differently than most people,” she told the audience at the Skift Global Forum, a travel conference held last month in Brooklyn. "I can't walk into a space without critiquing it and wanting to rearrange the furniture. And I plan every vacation around buildings and spaces around the world that I want to see."

Since taking over at the Denver airport in 2008, Ms. Day has helped to transform it into the envy of airports around the country: In this year's annual World Airport Awards rankings, it held the eighth spot for all airports with more than 50 million passengers per year, the top United States ranking. One improvement is brand-new: a 519-room Westin Hotel that opens on Nov. 19 just next to the iconic canopies of the Jeppesen terminal. (An adjoining public plaza will host events and two restaurants, each with outdoor seating.) And next April will see the addition of a commuter rail, with access from a terminal under the hotel, and just a few minutes from security, that gets travelers from the airport to Union Station in downtown Denver in just 37 minutes.

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Rolling Stone covers Snoop Dogg's marijuana brand launch in Denver

Rolling Stone covered Snoop Dogg launching his marijuana brand, Leafs by Snoop, in Denver.

Excerpt:

There's something almost too perfect about Snoop Dogg -- a man who once claimed to smoke 81 blunts a day -- coming to a town nicknamed the Mile High City to debut his new line of cannabis products. But on Monday night, he descended upon Denver with his Leafs by Snoop collection to do just that. The 44-year-old rapper and entrepreneur turned a private residence into his own personal Dogghouse, showcasing his diverse weed wares, spinning some G-funk, spitting a few bars and, at one point, basically hotboxing a select crowd of Coloradans into oblivion with lots and lots of stinky, Snoop-selected strains.

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Matador Network weighs "cost of gentrification in Denver"

Matador Network published a piece on "The cost of gentrification in Denver."

Excerpt:

Recently, at the windowless Candlelight Tavern in the Wash Park West neighborhood, I struggled to back up my belief that places like this are a part of our culture any more than the newer, trendier places that have opened on Broadway and the other side of the park.

"What the fuck is wrong with this generation's mindless pursuit of ironic authenticity?" asked fellow patron Scot Kreider, a 42-year-old lawyer and Denver area native. “What is this so-called "opposite" of a dive bar? Please give me an example. Because as far as I can tell, a 'dive' bar is wherever a fucking hipster goes so that they can feel authentic, which immediately cheapens it."

I fell into a deep crisis of self-confidence. Am I a hipster merely because I'm 31? Am I degrading this long-running establishment just by being here, when I was not born in the neighborhood? The uncomfortable feeling that has grown inside me isn't just about my preference for cheap booze. It is about rooting for the home team, even when they are the underdog. It is about the people's history of their neighborhoods living on for upcoming generations.

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WaPo spotlights Nathaniel Rateliff and the Night Sweats

The Washington Post profiled Nathaniel Rateliff and the Night Sweats.

Excerpt:

Instead of giving up, Rateliff started working on songs for a new project he cooked up: the Night Sweats, a seven-piece rock and soul band that sounds nothing like his solo work.

"It got me really excited again," he says.

In the meantime, his management scraped together enough money to start a record label, and "Falling Faster" was released in September 2013. Rateliff went on tour behind the album, he and the Night Sweats began playing the newer songs in their Denver home base, and things slowly started taking off from there.

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Playboy names Cooper Lounge to "Best Bars" list

Playboy tabbed the Cooper Lounge in Union Station for its 2015 "Best Bars in America" feature.

Excerpt:

BEST BAR IN A TRAIN STATION
Cooper Lounge, Denver
Revamped Union Station is an architectural masterpiece. Sitting in this elegant boîte, one almost expects the Orient Express to glide through. The mezzanine locale guarantees downtown views to relish alongside cocktails such as the St. Therese (tequila, Bénédictine, Ancho Reyes liqueur) and Colorado Wagyu tartare spiked with sriracha dressing.

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CNN calls Denver "best beer town"

A CNN column argued Denver was the best beer city in the U.S. and backed it up with nine sudsy features.

Excerpt:

[I]f you're looking at the question through the bottom of a glass of craft brew -- and these days, who isn't? -- the argument usually boils down to two cities; Portland, Oregon, and Denver, Colorado.

For me, the answer is easy: the Mile High City trumps them all.

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Hyperallergic hypes upcoming "Women of Abstract Expressionism" exhibit at DAM

Hyperallergic reported on the "Women of Abstract Expressionism" exhibit coming to the Denver Art Museum in 2016.

Excerpt:

The paradigm of the "overlooked female artist" is both a cliché and a truth. We all know the art market is unceasingly hungry, and previously sidelined women artists are the perfect food. But that doesn’t change the fact that countless female artists have been ignored, forgotten, and stepped on, that movements defined by their male stars have entire other histories still in need of writing.

Exhibitions are a way to begin that process, and next spring, the Denver Art Museum (DAM) will mount one. The title -- Women of Abstract Expressionism -- says it all: this is a show devoted to the women artists involved with the famously macho movement, and it is the first of its kind. Highlighting better-known names -- Lee Krasner, Joan Mitchell -- alongside lesser-known ones -- Sonia Gechtoff, Perle Fine -- the exhibition will encompass 12 women’s work, "focus[ing] on the expressive freedom of direct gesture and process at the core of abstract expressionism, while revealing inward reverie and painterly expression," according to the description. It will also include a new video exploring these women’s lives -- the particulars as well as the broader (sexist) cultural conditions of the 1950s -- through their own testimony and that of their children.

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NY Times hits Denver "Weedstock"

The New York Times reported on the inaugural National Cannabis Summit in Denver.

Excerpt:

If the $97 million in tax revenue that Andrew Freedman, Colorado's director of marijuana coordination, expects the state to earn this fiscal year cannot be described as a game-changer to a state whose all-funds budget for the fiscal year ending in June was $27 billion, you wouldn’t know it from the resultant swirl of activity.

If you have a layover at the Denver airport, you can, for about $300, hire a car to take you to a dispensary and then smoke in the vehicle (as one website puts it: "no driving sweeeeeeet"); there are also meals with cannabis pairings, and cannabis-infused bubble baths.

This thing could be bigger than cellphones and cupcakes.

Read the rest here.

Paste profiles Denver Biscuit Co.

Paste Magazine ran a story on Denver Biscuit Company.

Excerpt:

There is nothing quite like a light, buttery biscuit straight from the oven. A staple to the Southern diet, at one point in time it was nearly impossible to sit down for a meal without finding biscuits at the table. In theory, biscuits are pretty straightforward, made with simple ingredients like flour, baking soda and powder, buttermilk, butter, and salt; but despite their simplicity, there are countless recipes that are handed down from generation to generation, all with slight variances and diehard flour preferences. But as with everything else, there is always room for improvement.

When Drew Shader, owner of the Denver Biscuit Company, came to Colorado from Florida to attend the University of Colorado in Boulder he noticed that no one in Denver was making the traditional Southern folded biscuit (and if they were, they weren’t doing it well). "There were a lot of drop biscuits," he told me, "but I couldn’t find a biscuit I loved." After college, Shader ended up in the bar and restaurant business and really embraced food as a passion. I recently spoke with Shader about why food was such a passion for him and how he was able to create the perfect fluffy biscuit in a city at elevation.

Read the rest here.

Financial Times looks at "new golden age" in Denver

The Financial Times reported on a "new golden age" in Denver, based on real estate and a hot economy.

Excerpt:

More than 100,000 out-of-state residents moved to Denver between 2010 and 2014, according to the US Census Bureau, the fifth-largest migration in the country. For the first time, people aged 20 to 34 outnumber baby boomers in the city, the census data show.

"Denver has always been a magnet for people from the Midwest and parts of the west," says estate agent Anthony Rael, chair of the Denver Metro Association of Realtors' market trends committee. "But we're now seeing large numbers of newcomers from the east coast and California."

Growing technology and telecoms sectors are driving the population increase, as is general economic growth. Colorado's economy grew 4.7 per cent last year, which was more than double the national average and the fifth-strongest US state, according to the US Department of Commerce. IBM, Oracle and Lockheed Martin are among the tech companies that have expanded in Denver, bringing tens of thousands of new jobs to the city. Much of the expansion is due to job-training programmes and tax incentives launched by the city in recent years.

Read the rest here.

Entrepreneur calls Denver second-best market "to get rich from real estate"

Entrepreneur tabbed Denver as the second-best market "to get rich from real estate" after Dallas.

Excerpt:

Falling closely behind Dallas, Denver takes the number-two spot, driven largely by the strongest appreciation in home values of any major market studied over the period. Residential real-estate prices increased a staggering 13.4 percent year over year across the Denver metro region.

Read the rest here.
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