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Johnson Nathan Strohe designs City Park Golf clubhouse

Johnson Nathan Strohe has designed a view-oriented clubhouse to anchor the City Park Golf Course, which is being rebuilt.

The design’s stone, wood and glass materials will help to integrate the clubhouse into the new golf course. Its curvilinear form will allow for public functions with a panoramic facade that will capture course, city and mountain views.

Slated for completion in the spring of 2019, the 22,560-square-foot project includes an upper level for golf operations and entertainment, as well as a sunken lower level for golf cart storage. In addition to serving as an amenity space for golfers, the clubhouse is suited for events such as weddings, family reunions and other social gatherings.

The clubhouse also includes space for The First Tee of Denver golf program, which aims to educate and inspire youth academically, socially and physically through the game of golf. Adjacent new buildings will accommodate maintenance operations and a comfort station.

The project is part of a broader golf course redesign that will increase course yardage, create a driving range without netting, provide new sidewalks to improve connectivity and integrate storm water detention.

Johnson Nathan Strohe has previously designed public golf clubhouses for Indian Tree Golf Club, Riverdale Golf Club and The Greg Mastriona Golf Courses at Hyland Hills.

Historic Denver stops the wrecking ball aimed at the Elyria Building

Denver has agreed to postpone demolition of the Elyria Building at 4701 Brighton Blvd. to give Historic Denver a chance to conduct a Historic Structure Assessment.

The assessment will provide documentation of the building and determine whether it can be relocated and saved.

The city has slated the building for demolition to accommodate the expansion of Brighton Boulevard north of 47th Street for bike lanes and streetscape improvements. Formerly known as Fuller’s Drug Store and located on what was once Elyria’s Main Street, the prominent 1906 commercial building was used by neighbors to buy their groceries and host meetings, political rallies and social gatherings.

Historic Denver says that it’s possible the building could be incorporated into the National Western Complex site to provide a tangible reminder of the neighborhood’s history, as well as a human-scaled, authentic place-maker. The assessment, made possible by a grant from the Colorado State Historical Fund, is currently under way by Form + Works with assistance from Martin/Martin Engineering.

Since 2011, Historic Denver has advocated for historic preservation as part of the plans for the reimagined National Western Stock Show site. Among its successes are the recent landmark designation of the 1909 Stadium Arena, which will be rehabilitated and reused, as well as plans to protect and reuse the Stockyard Exchange Building and Stock Show Association Building.
 

Aria Denver is part of National Building Museum exhibit

A Denver developer’s cohousing project is featured in a National Building Museum exhibit called Making Room: Housing for a Changing America.

Located in Washington, D.C., the museum’s exhibit explores new design solutions for the nation’s evolving, 21st-century households. From tiny houses to accessory apartments, cohousing and beyond, these alternatives push past standard choices and layouts. the exhibit will run through Sept. 16.

Urban Ventures’ 28-unit Aria Cohousing Community, on the site of the former Marycrest Convent at West 52nd Avenue and Federal Boulevard, is similar to other cohousing developments in that residents have private living spaces, as well as community-based common areas that allow them to share meals and interests. The goal is to create an intergenerational and mixed-income community that is committed to sustainability, inclusivity and intellectual growth.

“We are honored to have the Aria Cohousing Community showcased in the National Building Museum as recognition of cohousing as a successful lifestyle that promotes community engagement and social cohesion at a time when there is so much isolation in our country,” says Susan Powers, president of Urban Ventures.

The post-World War II suburbanization of America was driven by the housing needs of nuclear families, the nation’s leading demographic, according to the National Building Museum. In 1950, these families represented 43 percent of households; in 1970 it was 40 percent.

Today, nuclear families account for 20 percent of America’s households, while nearly 30 percent of people are single adults living alone, a growing phenomenon across all ages and incomes, and it’s causing developers to reimagine the way they build communities.

In addition to the Aria Cohousing Community, the Making Room exhibit features housing alternatives like micro-apartments in New York City; backyard accessory cottages in Seattle; and tiny houses that are helping the formerly homeless in Austin.
 

Denver Tennis Park under construction

Construction has started on Denver Tennis Park at 1560 S. Franklin St. adjacent to Denver Public Schools All City Stadium complex.

The project, being built by PCL Construction, is the first publicly accessible youth-centered indoor/outdoor tennis facility in the Denver region. It will feature seven indoor courts and six outdoor courts. The project is expected to be completed in October.

The Denver Tennis Park is a new non-profit organization with a mission to foster whole child development for youth of all ages and abilities. The initiative is a collaboration of the Denver Tennis Park, the University of Denver and Denver Public Schools. The project has been funded philanthropically, and DPS has provided funds for a portion of the drainage work at the site. Fundraising efforts are under way as part of a capital campaign.

“This will be a tremendous addition to the Denver tennis community, as well as to student athletes for the Denver Public Schools and Denver University,” says Kerri Block, PCL’s project manager for the Denver Tennis Park. “PCL is looking forward to delivering an outstanding tennis complex to the people supporting this effort and everyone who plays — or wants to learn to play — a great lifelong sport.”

The project also includes regrading part of the surrounding athletic fields to divert storm runoff to a new 48,000 cubic foot underground retention system. The 279-space parking lot also will be preserved to serve sporting events, as well as the tennis park.

Improvements to JCC completed

After spending a year under construction, improvements to the Staenberg-Loup Jewish Community Center are complete.

“We have been working hard over the last 12 months to update our main campus and some of our other facilities, including Ranch Camp and the Tennis Center, in a variety of areas that needed some attention,” says Lara Knuettel, CEO of the JCC Denver. “We are appreciative of our members and the community who has been patient with us as we made these much-needed updates. These renovations help ensure that our buildings are safe for the community and provide a better experience for members and their guests.”

The updates include:
  • Creating a new Early Childhood Center wing with five new classrooms and updating the existing wing with new paint, fixtures and lighting, as well as new landscaping on an existing playground.
  • Remodeling several areas of the Fitness & Wellness Center, including renovating the men’s and women’s locker rooms, creating a new childcare drop-off center with access to an outdoor space, adding massage rooms, purchasing new cardio equipment, creating a new group cycling room and updating the HVAC system and ventilation.
  • Opening up the lobby, including removing pillars, adding sliding doors to the entrance, enhancing security, adding energy-efficient lighting and new artwork.
  • Redoing the parking lots to add more parking spaces while making them larger.
  • Updating the exterior of the building including painting and adding new signage and landscaping.
  • Adding new artwork, paint and carpet in different areas of the building.
  • Adding new back drops, ceiling and LED lighting at the Tennis Center.
  • Updating the JCC”s Ranch Camp in Elbert by adding to new turf activity fields, updating the dining hall and adding new landscaping.

Fund to help artists make spaces safe



Denver Arts & Venues has launched the Safe Creative Spaces Fund as an extension of the city’s Safe Occupancy Program in an effort to provide funding for improvements to buildings that are occupied by artists.

The program will provide $300,000 in need-based funding for creative space tenant safety and building improvements. Applications are being accepted online.

“We are committed to cultivating, sustaining and promoting our diverse artistic and creative industry, including that our artists have a safe, affordable space where they can live and work,” Mayor Michael Hancock says. “The Safe Occupancy Program and the Safe Creative Spaces Fund are designed to support our creative professionals with resources to get these live-work spaces up to code, keep them affordable and avoid further displacements.”

Funding will be administered through Jan. 17, 2020 and is available to tenant or owner applicants who own or run a creative space such as a live/work collective, a creative business or a creative assembly space in the City and County of Denver that is enrolled in the Safe Occupancy Program.

The funds will be administered through a partnership with RedLine, a nonprofit contemporary art center. RedLine also will facilitate support between artists and art businesses. Applicants are encouraged to contact Redline for free, confidential guidance before enrolling in the Safe Occupancy Program or applying for Safe Creative Spaces Funding.

“RedLine is very excited to collaborate with Denver Arts & Venues, the City of Denver and the greater arts and culture communities to help address the growing need for safe creative spaces in Denver,” says Louise Martorano, executive director of RedLine. “Both the Safe Occupancy Program and Safe Creative Space Fund represent two key initiatives that not only provide a path for security and stability for artists in creative spaces, but also the financial resources to make that path accessible.”
 

Art, event and maker space Lot Twenty Eight opens in RiNo next summer

Next summer, Denver developer Formativ will open Lot Twenty Eight, a 45,000-square-foot restaurant retail and event space in the River North neighborhood.

The project, in a former manufacturing plant at 28th and Blake streets, also includes a 20,000-square-foot outdoor urban garden designed for gathering, events and community activations. The development includes space for unique food and beverage concepts, gathering spaces, street-facing retail and an artist maker space.

Designed by Oz Architecture, Lot Twenty Eight’s artist and maker space will allow the local creative community to show their work and expand their brands. Small and mid-sized, open rooms will be available for individuals or groups to rent. The space will enable makers to be highly visible.

There also will be 2,300 square feet of event space that can be reserved for private, community or corporate events. When not in use, the space will be programmed as a rotating gallery featuring the works of local artists.

Founded by Sean Campbell and Josh Marinos, Formativ’s projects include the World Trade Center Denver adjacent to the 38th and Blake commuter rail stop and Industry, a 4-year-old collaborative workspace and residential development on Brighton Boulevard.

Eight showrooms sign on to IDC Building

When The IDC Building opens early next year, it will house up to 15 of the metro area’s top home-design showrooms in 60,000 square feet at 590 Quivas St.

The showrooms will offer a variety of products and services an a range of styles from modern to contemporary and traditional to transitional. Each showroom was chosen for its unique product selection and the value they bring to trade professionals and homeowners alike.

“Gone are the days of the traditional design center model with exclusivity only to the trade and doors and walls between every showroom,” says Al Castelo, head developer of IDC. “When creating The IDC Building concept, my team and I visited major design centers around the country and discovered the demand for a more experiential retail model. We chose to build a community at IDC and create an accessible environment that encourages partners, homeowners and the trade to collaborate.”

So far, eight showrooms have signed onto to be part of The IDC Building:
  • Aztec Carpet & Rug
  • Benjamin Moore
  • Classy Closets
  • Custom Concrete Prep & Polish
  • Inspire Kitchen Design
  • Lolo Rugs & Gifts
  • T&G Flooring
  • Ultra Design Center
The functional displays will allow visitors to experience how products will look and work in their own homes.

The building was a collective effort designed by architect Hartronft Associates and developed and owned by Tri-West Companies.
 

Del Corazon apartments open in Westwood

A $40 million affordable housing project has opened in Denver’s Westwood neighborhood.

The 197-unit Del Corazon at 4400 Morrison Road is located on 4.5 acres spanning both sides of Morrison Road. All of the apartments will be available to households earning 60 percent or less of the area median income (up to $35,280 for a one-person household or up to $45,360 for a family of three.

Community amenities include a clubhouse with fitness center, lounge, kitchen, patio, playground, futsal court, community plaza and Westwood’s first-ever car-share program provided by Enterprise. The project also features a new median for safe crossing of Morrison Road.

Del Corazon, meaning “from the heart,” was developed by St. Charles Town Co. Public finance partners include the Denver Office of Economic Development, Colorado Department of Local Affairs and the Colorado Housing and Finance Authority.

Last year, Denver’s Community Planning and Development Office completed a neighborhood plan for Westwood, which is bounded by Sheridan Boulevard on the west, Federal Boulevard on the east, Alameda Avenue on the north and Mississippi Avenue on the south. The plan addresses the neighborhood’s isolation and food options, while celebrating the culture of the diverse community. The plan includes a health impact assessment from the Department of Environmental Health and addresses the neighborhood’s obesity rate, density and drainage issues and lack of recreation facilities.
 

Family Jones distillery opens in LoHi

The Family Jones Spirit House has opened in Denver’s Lower Highland neighborhood.

The distillery at 3245 Osage St. is the result of a partnership between distiller Rob Masters and entrepreneurs Jack Pottle, Denielle Nadeau and Paul Tamburello, the developer behind the Olinger complex and Little Man Ice Cream. Justin Cucci, chef and owner of Root Down, Linger, Ophelia’s Electric Soapbox, Vital Root and El Five is also part of the team.

Located in a 2,000-square-foot space at 3245 Osage St., The Family Jones Distillery occupies the former Mancinelli’s Market building two doors from Root Down. Designed and built by tres birds workshop, the space pairs industrial elements with rich wood details. The roof was lifted to add a second-floor mezzanine where distillery operations are perched above a sunken, curvilinear, concrete bar. Guests enter the space through a large, square, woodent door made from reclaimed, on-site materials.

“This project has been a dream for several years,” Tamburello says. “The sharing of spirits and the idea of libation are part of many celebrations in life — whether it be celebrating the life of a loved one, toasting to new parents or even part of a liturgical service. It’s with this respect and knowledge that we enter this venture, crafting with care a family of spirits that will help people mark life’s special moments together.”

The 17-foot copper CARL still is where the blending begins. The Family Jones creates everything from vodka to gin and rum, as well as Stop Gap Whiskey, a house blend of whiskeys collected from Masters’ friends that will only be available at The Family Jones Spirit House during the distillery’s first years while The Family Jones’ house-distilled whiskey comes of age.

“We are making things that push the boundaries of a traditional cocktail bar,” Masters says. “We are putting our own spin on it. This is a distiller’s dream — to create all sorts of crazy things in small batches. It’s a test kitchen: If it doesn’t work, we can try something new.”
 

The Bindery opens in LoHi

Chef Linda Hampsten Fox has opened The Bindery, a culinary concept modeled after European marketplaces where diners can shop for handcrafted products, grab a gourmet lunch to go or enjoy a chic fine dining experience all in one space.

Located in the recently opened Centric LoHi apartment complex in Denver’s Lower Highland neighborhood, The Bindery will offer options for breakfast lunch and dinner, seven days a week, as well as catering services.

“The Bindery is a culmination of everything I’ve done and provides the perfect platform to share my passion for the craft of cooking sustainable, local food rooted in my personal history and heritage,” says Hampsten Fox.

Hampsten Fox searched for years for a space large enough to accommodate the multifaceted experience. At just over 4,000 square feet, The Bindery welcomes visitors with a mix of modern style and old-world charm.

The marketplace, which surrounds the bakery/cafe, will offer a mix of seasonal products made in-house, including house Bindery Sriracha (referred to as Bindaracha), smoked maple syrup, cardamom pear butter and habanero tomato jam.

“Our customers lead busy lives, and they want options: to stay or go, be casual or be served, to snack or feast,” Hampsten Fox says. “Our goal is to provide them with convenient, high-quality choices.”

The main dining room focuses on meats and recipes borrowed from her Polish-Czech heritage, as well as the many years she spent cooking in Italy. The menu has a blend of shared plates, salads, homemade pastas and hearty main dishes.

“We hope to serve as a neighborhood hub where fresh food, bold flavors and exceptional service are our hallmarks,” Hampsten Fox says.

The Confluence apartments open in new Denver high-rise

The Confluence, a 35-story apartment building in the Central Platte Valley, has officially opened.

It’s the first venture into the Denver market for developers PMRG and National Real Estate Advisors.

“We’re very excited to contribute to the positive growth taking place in this vibrant city,” says Bryant Nail, PMRG’s executive vice president of multi-family development. “We have an outstanding track record with similar properties in other parts of the country, and we’re pleased to make The Confluence one of our most recent additions to our portfolio.”

Designed by GDA Architects, the building’s amenities include a heated outdoor pool and hot tub on a large deck overlooking Confluence Park; cabanas with individual fire pits; master grilling stations; skyline lounges with NanaWall Systems; a professional chef’s kitchen and catering facility; a fitness center; gated, underground parking; a maintenance center for bikes and skis; direct access to Confluence Park; ground-floor retail; and a 24-hour front desk attendant.

All apartments have blackout shades; hand-scraped hardwood floors; gourmet kitchens with granite countertops and full-height backsplashes; designer porcelain tile in spa-style baths; walk-in closets; private terraces; and a washer and dryer in each unit. Some apartments have adjustable bookshelves and direct elevator access.

“The Confluence is in keeping with National’s investment strategy to develop build-to-core projects in America’s most dynamic urban locations, providing vanguard amenities and distinctive design for our tenants,” says Jeffrey Kanne, National’s president and CEO.
 

The Confluence apartments open in new Denver high-rise

The Confluence, a 35-story apartment building in the Central Platte Valley, has officially opened.

It’s the first venture into the Denver market for developers PMRG and National Real Estate Advisors.

“We’re very excited to contribute to the positive growth taking place in this vibrant city,” says Bryant Nail, PMRG’s executive vice president of multi-family development. “We have an outstanding track record with similar properties in other parts of the country, and we’re pleased to make The Confluence one of our most recent additions to our portfolio.”

Designed by GDA Architects, the building’s amenities include a heated outdoor pool and hot tub on a large deck overlooking Confluence Park; cabanas with individual fire pits; master grilling stations; skyline lounges with NanaWall Systems; a professional chef’s kitchen and catering facility; a fitness center; gated, underground parking; a maintenance center for bikes and skis; direct access to Confluence Park; ground-floor retail; and a 24-hour front desk attendant.

All apartments have blackout shades; hand-scraped hardwood floors; gourmet kitchens with granite countertops and full-height backsplashes; designer porcelain tile in spa-style baths; walk-in closets; private terraces; and a washer and dryer in each unit. Some apartments have adjustable bookshelves and direct elevator access.

“The Confluence is in keeping with National’s investment strategy to develop build-to-core projects in America’s most dynamic urban locations, providing vanguard amenities and distinctive design for our tenants,” says Jeffrey Kanne, National’s president and CEO.
 

Tiny homes village for homeless receives final donation

Denver’s first tiny home village has received the final donation it needs to close out funding for the project, which has been designed as an alternative solution to the problem of homelessness.

LivWell Cares, the philanthropic and community engagement arm of one of the country’s leading cannabis companies, provided $10,000 toward Beloved Community Village. The project is being developed by the Colorado Village Collaborative, a community organization founded by members of Denver Homeless Out Loud, The Interfaith Alliance of Colorado, Beloved Community Mennonite Church and residents of the Beloved Community Village.

“We are extremely grateful to LivWell Cares for stepping up to give us the finances to complete this much-needed project,” says Cole Chandler, organizer for Colorado Village Collaborative. “We need a solution to homelessness beyond shelters, emergency rooms and jails, and thanks to LivWell Cares, our Beloved Community Village residents can now take back their lives and their dignity.”

Designed to help address the twin crises of homelessness and an extreme housing shortage, Beloved Community Village includes 11 8-foot by 12-foot shelters, as well as a communal kitchen, bathroom and shower facilities on land leased from the Urban Land Conservancy at 38th and Walnut streets. In July, 14 previously homeless residents moved into the new village, where they have been able to rediscover talents, renew their purpose and restore their dignity.

“When I was told about this development, I immediately recognized its potential to help address a serious issue facing our communities,” says Michael Lord, LivWell Enlightened Health’s director of business development and founder of LivWell Cares. “LivWell Cares could not be prouder to be involved in such a worthy project.”
 

Conde Naste names the ART hotel No. 1

Conde Nast Traveler has recognized The ART, a hotel as the No.1 Top Hotel in Colorado.

Located in the heart of Denver’s museum district, the 165-room hotel showcases an expertly curated in-house art collection with more than 50 pieces of contemporary work, the FIRE restaurant and rooftop terraces. The ART also offers artistic programming to match the hotel’s aesthetic, including the ART Run, where guests can receive a curated map offering an urban public run through Denver’s prominent public art pieces, as well as the ART Ride, which allows guests to use complementary customer-designed bikes painted by local student artists to explore downtown Denver.

“We are thrilled to receive this respected travel award alongside other notable hotels in our state,” says General Manager Aaron Coburn. “We thank our loyal guests for choosing our hotel as their home base in Denver and our passionate staff for making every guest experience so memorable.”

More than 300,000 Conde Nast readers submitted millions of ratings and tens of thousands of comments, voting on a record number of 7,320 hotels and resorts, 610 cities, 225 islands, 468 cruise ships, 158 airlines and 195 airports.

The Conde Nast Traveler Readers’ Choice Awards are the longest-running and most prestigious recognition of excellence in the travel industry and are commonly known as “the best of the best of travel.”
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