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More Laurel Cherry Creek condos released for sale

Kentwood Real Estate has released another phase of condominiums for sale at Laurel Cherry Creek.

The newly released collection of high-rise condos includes one of each floor plan and an 11th floor penthouse. Previews are available by appointment with Kentwood listing broker Dawn Raymond. Interested buyers can visit the sales gallery to view the finish packages, the 3D interactive model with views for each residence and interior, exterior and amenity renderings.

“Because our first phase of sales outpaced construction, the development and sales team have waited until now to come back to market, when we can present the final finishes and floor plans,” says Raymond, who specializes in luxury properties in and around Cherry Creek. “Interest has been high for Laurel Cherry Creek, and we look forward to welcoming potential buyers.”

Located at 215 St. Paul St., features for Laurel Cherry Creek include:
  • Private balcony or terrace with glass railings
  • Pella multi-panel sliding glass doors or folding glass NanaWall
  • Custom-designed, stained 8-foot walnut entry doors
  • 8-foot solid-core contemporary interior doors
  • Linear gas fireplaces
  • Up to 10-foot-8-inch ceiling heights throughout living areas
  • Looped-wool carpet in all bedrooms
  • Porcelain tile flooring in all bathrooms and laundry
  • Energy-efficient LED lighting
  • Natural gas BBQ service and hose bibs on balconies
  • Prewired with fiber-optic technology
“We have designed Laurel Cherry Creek to be the preeminent residential address in Cherry Creek,” says Paul Powers, president of Pauls Corp., which is developing the project. “Owners will enjoy upscale, maintenance-free living in one of the most sought-after neighborhoods in the United States.”

New Highland townhouses will have views of Denver skyline

Sagebrush Cos. has started construction of 29ZEN, a luxury townhome development at West 29th and Zenobia streets in Denver’s Highland neighborhood.

Designed by Sanzpont Architecture and S-Arch, 29ZEN will have 14 residences with prices starting at $649,999. There will be a mix of two- and three-bedroom units with an average size of 2,000 square feet. Some of the town homes will have rooftop decks with views of the Denver skyline and walkout basements. The general contractor is K2, and MileHi Modern is the listing brokerage.

“We have had the pleasure of delivering quality residential developments to people living and working in Denver’s urban core, and 29ZEN will be another development that meets our company’s very high standards,” says Robert “Jake” Jacobsen, founder and chief executive of Sagebrush. “We take a great deal of pride in identifying unique real estate opportunities that will bring success to our partners and, most importantly, the communities we intend to serve with our projects. 20ZEN will accomplish all those things.”
 

CU Denver team takes second in HUD competition

A student team from the University of Colorado-Denver College of Architecture and Planning took second place in the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development’s Affordable Housing competition.

The goal of the national competition was to advance the design and production of livable and sustainable housing for low- and moderate-income people through research and innovation. The competition asks teams to address social, economic and environmental issues in their response to a specific housing problem developed by an actual public housing agency.

The CU team, which included Stacy Ester, Joel Miller, Adam Buehler, Nora Bland and William Dolenshek, won a $10,000 prize.

The team’s project, entitled “Allied Living,” was designed to be a community grounded in safe, inclusive and connected spaces. Five guiding principles — identity, connectivity, accessibility, wellness and experience — informed the team’s design. The walkability and accessibility of the site connects larger community hubs through smaller social nodes, intentionally using everyday places to encourage interaction and place making. Sunlit spaces, community gardens and ease of access to nature support the overall wellness of the community’s residents.

Allied Living was envisioned to be a home where residents can express their own identities, branch out to experience new things and connect with empowering community partners as well as each other. Achieving the vision required proposing an inclusionary zoning provision to the existing zoning and balancing the project’s hard and soft costs with anticipated sources of funding and income.

Kid visits to DAM up 51 percent

More than 200,000 children and youth visited the Denver Art Museum in 2017 — a 51 percent increase in youth visits to the museum over the previous year.

The spike in youth visits can be attributed to a partnership between Bellco Credit Union and the DAM in support of the museum’s Free for Kids program, which launched in March 2015 with a five-year gift from museum trustee Scott Reiman. The program offers free general admission to all visitors ages 18 and younger.

Bellco became a presenting sponsor of Free for Kids in 2016, bringing additional support to the program, including enhanced learning and engagement opportunities and materials for youth visitors, as well as funding for outreach to underserved communities. The program also offers free general admission for school tours and other youth group visits, such as summer camps and community-based youth programs.

“Thanks to Bellco’s financial support, the Free for Kids program has provided thousands of kids and teens with access to the arts,” says Christoph Heinrich, the Frederick and Dan Mayer Director of the DAM. “Bellco’s commitment to ensuring that young people have the opportunity to experience the transformative power of the arts is truly inspiring. It is because of this commitment that we were proud to nominate Bellco for a 2018 Business for the Arts Award through the Colorado Business Committee for the Arts.
 

Pedestrian Shops opens in Central Platte Valley

The Pedestrian Shops has opened its third location at 15th and Platte streets in the Central Platte Valley.

The family-owned footwear retailer, which has two shops in Boulder, is hosting a grand-opening celebration through April 22. The celebration includes giveaways, gifts with purchases and special events.

“We’ve always been interested in opening a store in Denver,” says Richard Polk, Pedestrian Shops’ president and founder. “It took us over 40 years to find the perfect location.”

The Pedestrian Shops offers a selection of comfortable shoes. Popular brands include Birkenstock, Dansko, Keen, Merrell, Vionic, Chaco, Lems and Naot.

Coinciding with the grand opening is Pedestrian Shops’ annual Earth Day Shoe Drive. This Earth Day marks the 59th shoe drive — a second is held annually at Thanksgiving. Customers are asked to bring in footwear that they never wear — any kind, any brand, new or slightly used. Donors are offered a 10 percent discount on a new pair of shoes. Donated shoes are distributed to local assistance organizations. Donations will be accepted at all three pedestrian Shops through April 29.

The new Denver store is located at 2368 Platte St. In Boulder, the stores are located on the Pearl Street Mall and in the Village Shopping Center near McGuckin Hardware.

Koelbel develops landmark hospital into townhomes

Koelbel Urban Homes has broken ground on Sloansedge Southshore Townhomes, a 27-unit residential project on the former St. Anthony Hospital site at Sloan’s Lake.

“Sloansedge is exactly what Denver’s home seeker has been waiting and asking for,” says Peter Benson, senior vice president for Koelbel Urban Homes. “It’s ideally located in one of Denver’s desirable mixed-use areas but is still priced reasonably for all stages of home buyer.”

Located near the Highland and Edgewater neighborhoods, Sloansedge is just blocks from light rail. It’s directly across the street from the 284-acre Sloan’s Lake Park, Denver’s largest recreational body of water with more than three miles of trails, a marina, sports fields, tennis courts and a new playground. Sloan’s Lake offers sailing and kayaking from the marina and is a short walk or bike ride to cafes, breweries, restaurants and groceries.

The two- and three-bedroom townhomes range in size from 1,335 square feet to 2,600 square feet. Prices start in the mid $500,000s. Each of the five floor plans has large windows and outdoor entertainment spaces, some with views of the city, lake or mountains. All incorporate energy-efficient features and high-quality finishes such as quartz countertops and pre-finished hardwood throughout the main living level.

The sales center is now open at 4052 W. 17th Ave.

Most residents think city is not doing enough to battle homelessness, according to survey

A citywide survey confirmed what the Colorado Coalition for the Homeless has been saying for years: Homelessness and affordable housing are serious concerns and realities for Denver residents.

Key findings of the survey, which collected live telephone responses from 404 likely 2018 voters, include:
  • Homelessness ranked as the third-most-critical issue for the mayor and City Council to address, following affordable housing and education.
  • 96 percent of those surveyed said homelessness is a “serious problem” in Denver.
  • 66 percent said “too little” action is being taken by the mayor and City Council to make housing more affordable and address homelessness.
Of those surveyed, 68 percent own their homes, and 57 percent said they had experienced homelessness themselves or had a family member of friend who experienced homelessness.

“This data confirms what we already know and have experienced for the past 32 years: The city must prioritize making substantial investments in homelessness services and affordable housing,” says Cathy Alderman, vice president of communications and public policy at the Colorado Coalition for the Homeless. “More and more people are being marginalized and left behind by Denver’s economic growth, and it is imperative that our elected officials implement immediate strategies to reduce homelessness and provide better access to affordable housing.

The survey was sponsored by All in Denver, the Colorado Coalition for the Homeless, Del Norte Community Development Corp., Denver Foundation, Gates Family Foundation, Gorman & Co., Habitat for Humanity of Metro Denver and the Urban Land Conservancy.

RiNo Made store offers local art at Zeppelin Station

With the opening of RiNo Made at Zeppelin Station, there’s now a permanent place for artists in the RiNo Art District to show off their creative talent.

The 600-square-foot store will sell a rotating inventory of 2D artworks, as well as ceramics, sculpture, jewelry, books, stationary and other handmade gifts and homewares. RiNo Made will host a featured artist each month on the main gallery wall in the store.

“We are thrilled to be able to showcase all the amazing artwork and products created in the RiNo Art District,” says Tracy Weil, the district’s creative director. “Our goal is to tell their stories to our customers, while communicating the importance of buying local art as it helps our artists make a living at what they love to do.”

The RiNo Made store features work made exclusively by artists and makers within the RiNo Art District. Its goal is to display the work of artists and makers in the district at a permanent location, as well as create a broader platform for creative businesses to showcase their work. As part of the effort, the district will provide monthly salons dedicated to helping artists and creative entrepreneurs kick start, grow and strengthen their businesses by providing with tools and educational opportunities.

Artists will receive 60 percent of the sale of their work, with the RiNo Art District receiving 40 percent for store operations and other artists initiatives in the district.

“When visitors buy art from our artists at the RiNo Made store, they are directly supporting our vibrant artist community,” RiNo Art District President Jamie Licko said.

Located in the newly opened Zeppelin Station at 3501 Wazee Street, the district’s new store is the first retail storefront to open in Denver’s chef-driven food hall. The district’s new headquarters and office space is located adjacent to the storefront.
 

CHFA gets $7.1 grant for affordable housing

A $7.1 million grant to Colorado Housing and Finance Authority (CHFA) will support the development and preservation of affordable rental housing across the state.

CHFA estimates the grant will help provide housing for about 725 households in both rural and urban communities.

“The need for affordable housing across Colorado is significant and spans the housing continuum from those experiencing homelessness and special needs to housing for our seniors, veterans and workforce,” says Cris White, CHFA executive director and chief executive. “Investment in affordable housing is an investment in our state’s infrastructure and quality of life. We are very excited to receive this award and will use these resources to help local communities target their specific and unique housing needs.”

The Capital Magnet Fund grant will help further the reach of Colorado’s federal Low-Income Housing Tax Credits and state Affordable Housing Tax Credits by supplying additional gap funding required to make it feasible for affordable housing developments to be constructed or preserved.

Affordable housing is a much-needed resource in a state where population growth, combined with escalating development and construction costs, continues to place pressure on an already tight housing market. Colorado is ranked the fifth-most-challenging state in the nation for extremely low-income renters to find affordable housing, with only 27 affordable homes for every 100 extremely low-income renter household, according to the National Low Income Housing Coalition.

The Capital Magnet Fund is administered by the U.S. Department of the Treasury's Community Development Financial Institutions Fund (CDFI Fund). The Capital Magnet Fund was established by Congress in 2008, and offers competitively awarded grants to finance affordable housing solutions and community revitalization efforts.

Denver in program to keep low-income people in city

Denver has been selected to participate in a new program designed to stop forcing low-income residents out of cities.

Through the All-In Cities Anti-Displacement Policy Network, city teams will promote a range of strategies, including renter protections, community land trusts and community ownership models, commercial neighborhood stabilization, inclusionary zoning and other equitable development strategies. Participants will work to build the power, voice and capacity of communities directly impacted by displacement in defining the challenges and advancing solutions.

“Joining the All-In Cities Anti-Displacement Policy Network is an opportunity to work with our peer cities on new ways to ensure our economy works for everyone and address the same affordability challenges we’re all facing,” Mayor Michael Hancock said. “It’s our job to bring opportunities to communities that lift people up, not push them out, and our strong economy and market shouldn’t leave a single one of our residents behind.”

Network activities will include virtual learning labs, individualized coaching sessions with national experts and peer-to-peer learning opportunities. The network participants will first meet at the PolicyLink Equity Summit April 11-13 in Chicago. There will be another gathering this fall.

Each city has created teams of up to six local leaders, including mayors and city council members, senior city staff and community leaders. Denver’s team includes City Council President Albus Brooks; Jenny Santos, legal advocate of Servicios de La Raza Inc.; Sarah Showalter, citywide planning supervisor with Denver Community Planning and Development; Melissa Thate, housing policy officer with the Denver Office of Economic Development; and Tracy Winchester, executive director of the Five Points Business District.

“The timing of our selection to this network speaks to the challenges we currently face as a city and our call to ultimate inequality,” Brooks said. “Economic growth has the capacity to build both bridges and barriers. Economic success must be shared by all. This network allows us to collaborate on smart policies that will create a truly inclusive economy for all residents.”

Other cities selected for the network are Austin, Texas; Boston; Nashville; Philadelphia; Portland, Ore.; San Jose, Calif.; Santa Fe, N.M. and Minneapolis-St. Paul, Minn.


 

Colorado opens first women's history center

The Center for Colorado Women’s History opened this month at the Byers-Evans House Museum.

The center is the first state museum focused on the past, present and future achievements of Colorado women. Opening during National Women’s History Month, the Center for Colorado Women’s History honors women who are shaping Colorado’s history, community, economy, culture and heritage. The museum focuses on scholarship, research, public programs, narrative, lectures, school tours and exhibits that expand the understanding of the history of women in Colorado.

Fun facts about Colorado women’s history include:
  • Colorado was the first state in the union to enfranchise women by popular vote.
  • In 1894, Colorado became the first state to elect women to the state legislature.
  • Before and after statehood, women were critical in building Colorado communities, including schools, libraries and places of worship.
  • Today, the gender ratio in Colorado is almost equal, with 100 women to 101 men.
  • Today, Colorado ranks ninth in the country for women-owned businesses.
The Byers-Evans House is located at 1310 Bannock St.
 

Barre3 opens in Highlands Square

Barre3 has opened its fourth location in the Denver area at the corner of 32nd and Lowell in the Highlands Square neighborhood.

“We have been looking for the perfect spot to expand the barre3 brand for quite some time,” says Julie Gordon, owner of barre3 Highlands Square and barre3 Cherry Creek. “When the space in Highlands Square became available, we knew it was the perfect fit. We are so excited to bring our dynamic workout and welcoming exercise studio to such a vibrant community.

Located at 3241 N. Lowell Blvd., the studio was designed by Nizar Khoury of Zar Designs and is in keeping with the brand’s airy, modern aesthetic. The new studio has cork flooring for the barefoot workout and full-length mirrors behind the ballet bar. The Highlands Square location has lockers and two private showers stocked with natural products, clean towels and a full dry bar.
 

7 startups chosen for program to help growth

Seven Denver startups have been selected to participate in the city’s ScaleUp Network, an intensive six-month training program that helps proven but fledgling companies catapult to their next stage of growth.

The companies chosen for the program, now in its second year, are Altius Farms, Bold Betties, Ensight Energy Consulting, Maxwell Financial, Nokero, Orderly Health and Overwatch ID. The companies were all referred to the program upon graduation from a diverse set of business startup accelerators, and each firm has demonstrated the potential to garner capital investment and add jobs.

“Denver is proud to work with our startup and accelerator communities to hand-select enterprises that are positioned for growth, funding expansion and job creation,” says Turid Nagel-Casebolt, director of business development for the Denver Office of Economic Development (OED). “We’re building on last year’s ScaleUp Network, with training and key connections that is matched beautifully by the peer-to-peer mentoring among the founders themselves.”

The 2018 group of companies begins its curriculum knowing that the 2017 class is enjoying significant success in equity raises, obtaining other financing and leveraging critical connections. Leaders from the 2017 group have pledged to continue supporting each other in addition to actively guiding the 2018 class on the path to second-stage growth.
 

Major collection donated to Denver Art Museum

The Berger Collection Educational Trust has donated a major collection of British masterworks to the Denver Art Museum.

It’s the largest gift of European Old Masters since the museum received the Kress Collection in the 1950s. The gift, consisting of 65 works, will enrich the museum’s collection of European art, currently strong in early Italian Renaissance and French 19th-century artworks. The donation is part of the museum’s effort to strategically grow and enhance its encyclopedic collection in anticipation of its North Building’s 50th anniversary and revamped collection galleries, that set to reopen in 2021.

Core works from the trust have been on long-term loan since 1996, and the gift will now dramatically increase the museum’s holdings of 14th- through 19th-century European art. Major genres important to the British School, including portraiture, landscape and equestrian subjects, represent the bulk of the Berger trust gift.

“We are grateful to receive this important donation of British art from the Berger Collection Educational Trust, which will enable us to tell new stories with our collection,” says Dam director Christoph Heinrich. “Art inspires a greater understanding of and connection with our world, and we believe the acquired works will enhance and deepen the experiences of visitors into the future.”

The gift spans six centuries of paintings, drawings and medieval works. One of the earliest gifted artworks is a 14th-century Crucifixion, one of the best-preserved religious panel paintings of its period. Doroty, Lady Dacre by Sir Anthony van Dyck and Portrait of a Lady by Sir Peter Lely represent significant works by two 17th-century masters of portraiture.

“We’re delighted to integrate this significant gift into our collection of European art,” says Angelica Daneo, painting and sculptor curator at the DAM. “This is a transformational gift that complements and strengthens our existing holdings and allows us to offer our visitors a richer and broader narrative through focused and engaging juxtapositions, as well as educational programs and learning opportunities.”

The Berger trust gift is part of a larger donation that includes 12 Winslow Homer artworks that were donated to the Portland Museum of Art in Maine. To date, the gift made to the DAM and the Portland Museum of Art is the largest donation made by the trust in its two-decade history.

“William and Bernadette Berger were exceptionally committed to this city and community, to the arts and to education,” says Arthur Lipper, chairman of the Berger Collection Educational Trust board. “With this gift, the BCET trustees are fulfilling not only the mission of the trust but also the philanthropic intent of these visionary patrons. It is hoped the museum’s already excellent educational programs will be expanded.”

 

Here's the tasty lineup of eateries for brand new Zeppelin Station

A variety of culinary talents will have the opportunity to showcase their skills in the latest concept to be announced for Zeppelin Station, a creative workplace and marketplace slated to open March 12 at the 38th and Blake light-rail station in Denver’s River North neighborhood.

No Vacancy will feature a rotating lineup of of local, national and international restaurants that will occupy the front-and-center space, each for a 60- to 90-day stint.

The first guest to stay in No Vacancy will be Comal, the heritage food incubator in partnership with non-profit Focus Points Family Resource Center, where female entrepreneurs from the Globeville and Elyria-Swansea districts cook and serve the Mexican, El Salvadorian, Syrian and Ethiopian foods they grew up eating, while honing their culinary and business skills. Zeppelin Station will be the second, albeit temporary, outpost of Comal, which calls the Taxi development its permanent home.

The rest of the of food and beverage lineup includes:
  • Kiss + Ride, the main floor bar
  • Big Trouble, the upstairs cocktail bar and lounge
  • Namkeen, Indian snacks and street food
  • injoi, Korean comfort food
  • Au Feu: Montreal Smoked Meats
  • Vinh Xuong Bakery, a third-generation, family-owned banh mi shop
  • Aloha Poke Co., made-to-order raw fish bowls
  • Gelato Boy, a Boulder-based gelato shop
  • Dandy Lion Coffee


A full-service anchor restaurant, separate from the food stalls, will be revealed this summer.

“When we originally envisioned Zeppelin Station, we imagined a day and night destination where you’d find the most sought-after food and drinks in the city,” says Justin Anderson, director of hospitality development for Zeppelin Development. “Over the past year, we’ve assembled a lineup of highly regarded, independent operators who will showcase their very best dishes in an environment that encourages diners to personally experience the dishes being prepared through smell, sight and sound.”

The market hall also will be the new home of the RiNo Arts District and the organization’s retail shop that showcases pieces created by local artists

Designed by award-winning Dynia Architects, Zeppelin Station is on track for LEED certification and features indoor-outdoor open spaces, high ceilings, natural light and native plants in the exterior landscapes. Above the market hall, three floors of office suites offer roll-up garage doors that provide access onto green roof terraces overlooking the Denver skyline and Rocky Mountains. Office tenants include Beatport, Brandfolder and Love Your Hood.

“Denverites are seeking similar amenities in their workplace that they have at home: well-designed spaces, ready access to fresh air, great views and natural light in a hall experience on the ground floor that is the ultimate amenity,” says Kyle Zeppelin, president of Zeppelin Development.
 
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