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TheBigWonderful returns in May

When TheBigWonderful returns for its fourth season May 5-7, the pop-up event will feature city's best craft vendors, craft brewers and musicians will gather at the former Denver Post printing plant at 4400 Fox St. in Globeville.

TheBigWonderful's bazaar is curated to be a decidedly Denver experience. The city's best craft vendors and food trucks are brought together in one marketplace for a lively eating and shopping experience. Vendors will offer everything from fresh produce to handmade jewelry and clothing.

Hand-picked musical acts include a slew of bluegrass performers, including headliners Jeff Austin & Friends, The Drew Emmitt Band, Andy Thorn & Friends and DeadPhish Orchestra.

TheBigWonderful is partnering with Lyft for discounted ride sharing to and from the event all weekend long. TheBigWonderful's nonprofit partner this year is Re:Vision, an organization that works with people in economically marginalized areas to develop resident leaders, cultivate community food systems and create an economy owned by the community.

Tickets range from $5 for access to the day bazaar to $59 for the full weekend day and night bazaars with sampling from 20 boozy vendors and all bands.

Contact Confluence Denver Development News Editor Margaret Jackson with tips and leads for future stories at margaret@confluence-denver.com.

Tansey Contemporary to open in LoDo

An internationally renowned art gallery is relocating its headquarters to 1743 Wazee St. in Lower Downtown.

Tansey Contemporary is expanding its presence from Santa Fe, N.M., to Denver. Its current space on Santa Fe's famed Canyon Road will remain open, but Denver will be the headquarters from which the Tanseys hope to continue to expand the business' international reach.

"Denver is an attractive place to run an international business," says Michael Tansey, who with his wife, Jennifer, owns the gallery. "Its growing population, thriving economy, continually improving infrastructure, international accessibility and diverse, skilled workforce make it ideal for our purposes. We think it is significant that Denver's voters and leaders understand the positive contribution the arts make to the city's economic development, as demonstrated by the recent extension of the Scientific and Cultural Facilities District."

Michael Tansey is involved in the national arts community as majority owner and chairman of Art Miami LLC, which runs a growing portfolio of prestigious international art fairs primarily staged in Florida and New York.

Jennifer Tansey is from the Denver area. She left her position as membership manager at Colorado Public Radio to run the gallery, which the couple acquired in 2013. She is a member of the 2017 Colorado Business Committee for the Arts' Leadership Arts class.

Contact Confluence Denver Development News Editor Margaret Jackson with tips and leads for future stories at margaret@confluence-denver.com.

Washington leaves city post for real estate firm

Paul Washington has stepped down as executive director of the Denver Office of Economic Development to join JLL as market director for the Rocky Mountain Region.

As market director, Washington will oversee day-to-day operations for the region, including managing a team of more than 265 people and ensuring integrated business development opportunities for JLL business lines, including tenant representation, corporate accounts, capital markets, project development services, public institutions and agency leasing.

"As head of the Denver Office of Economic Development, part of my mission was to provide resources to help Colorado Businesses and communities thrive, and I see this new role as a kind of extension of that mission," Washington says. "JLL has a long history of helping Denver-area businesses create value and be more efficient through real estate acquisition and management. I look forward to working with the team here to fulfill that mission and continue to execute on growth strategies across our business lines."

Washington will work on the transition with JLL's Barry Dorfman, who in addition to serving as president of the Rocky Mountain Region and broker lead has also held the market director role since 2009.

"I'm tremendously proud of the work our team has done to set our clients in the region up for success, and I believe Paul's background and experience with the city make him uniquely qualified to continue to build on the foundation we've laid," Dorfman says. "With Paul's leadership as market director, I'll be able to focus my efforts entirely on brokerage services, our broker team and our clients."

Contact Confluence Denver Development News Editor Margaret Jackson with tips and leads for future stories at margaret@confluence-denver.com.

Arts & Venues partners with Meow Wolf on art space effort

Denver Arts & Venues is teaming up with Santa Fe's Meow Wolf to help with the compliance and safety needs of the city's Do-It-Yourself and alternative spaces.

Arts & Venues will contribute $20,000 toward funding the program organized by Meow Wolf, which previously announced plans to distribute $100,000 in annual funding to support safer DIY music and arts venues across the country. Arts & Venue's money will support infrastructural improvements, rent assistance, materials, equipment and other needs identified by Denver applicants. The fund also supports additional resources for legal, zoning and building code consulting services.

"Meow Wolf was an ideal partner for addressing short-term needs while we continue to explore more long-terms opportunities to support safe, creative spaces," says Kent Rice, executive director of Arts & Venuses. "As an artist collective, Meow Wolf has emerged as a leader in the region, working closely with Denver-based artists and reacting quickly to the acute space challenges of artists nationwide with the development of its funding program."

Meow Wolf is collecting applications for Denver-based funding until March 31. 

In addition to Arts & Venues' efforts, Denver Community Planning and Development and the Denver Fire Department have taken steps to support the needs of the arts community. For those seeking to turn an existing warehouse or commercial space into a live/work space, CPD launched a guide that outlines basic steps for establishing a safe and legal live/work space in an existing building. The fire department is offering free inspections for tenants and landlords, who can apply through March 31.

Contact Confluence Denver Development News Editor Margaret Jackson with tips and leads for future stories at margaret@confluence-denver.com.

Olive & Finch opens in Cherry Creek

The second location of Olive & Finch Eatery and Bakery has opened in Cherry Creek.

Complementing its Uptown restaurant, he new Olive & Finch at 3390 E. First Ave. cooks up food made from scratch in a casual setting. The restaurant serves breakfast all day, lunch and dinner, as well as coffee and spirits and pressed juices.

The Olive & Finch kitchen is stocked with breads baked daily, sauces made by hand and the freshest produce it can find. Its meats are cured smoked and seasoned by chefs on the premises.

The breakfast menu features a variety of hashes and sandwiches, as well as plates such as the Farmhouse Scramble, Polenta & Eggs or Shakshuka, a North African dish of stewed tomatoes, spices, roasted red peppers, caramelized onions, cilantro, feta and two cage free eggs.

The lunch menu boasts 16 different sandwiches ranging from the Ankara, a house-roasted turkey, brie and apple sandwich, to the Jamal, blackened fish, citrus tartar sauce, capers, Swiss cheese, coleslaw, avocado and roasted tomato on ciabatta.

Dinner items, available after 11 a.m.,  include steak, chicken, salmon, pork and four different flatbreads.

Under the direction of its owner/chef Mary Nguyen, Olive & Finch has been a supporter of various nonprofit organizations throughout Colorado. Every month, the restaurant partners with a nonprofit organization in its "Dining for a Cause" program, which benefits local and national programs. Work Options for Women, Share Our Strength and Project Angel Heart are just of few of the organizations it supports.

Contact Confluence Denver Development News Editor Margaret Jackson with tips and leads for future stories at margaret@confluence-denver.com.

RedPeak sells One City Block to RREEF

Denver-based developer RedPeak has sold the One City Block apartment complex in the city's Uptown neighborhood to RREEF America LLC.

The mixed-use LEED certified apartment buildings have 302 units and more than 400 parking spaces that are all concealed in a full block between 18th and 19th avenues and Logan and Pennsylvania.

"One City Block transformed the expansive site of a former Romanesque-style Catholic school into a LEED-certified destination within steps of the state capitol and central business district," says Terrance Hunt, vice chairman of ARA Newmark Company, which represented RedPeak in the deal. "An infill site of this size never will be available again in such a prime location, making this asset truly irreplaceable."

Clustered around a central courtyard, the residential buildings share outdoor amenities, including a 25-meter lap pool, hot tub, full-size sport court, practice putting green, fire pit and lush patio areas. Each building has its own lobby and rooftop deck. In addition, there is a demonstration kitchen, fitness center, separate yoga/TRX studio with weekly classes, lounge with billiards and ping-pong, pet spa, bike shop and business center. 

"There is a very big part of our organization's soul that went into creating, designing, building and operating this special community," says Mike Zoellner, CEO of RedPeak. "Everyone on our team is very proud of what we created here, and we wish RREEF America LLC much success with this one-of-a-kind asset in the future."

Contact Confluence Denver Development News Editor Margaret Jackson with tips and leads for future stories at margaret@confluence-denver.com.

Legacy breaks ground on Golden Triangle apartments

Legacy Partners has broken ground on TriVista on Speer, a seven-story 322-unit apartment project near Denver's Golden Triangle.

The project, located on Speer between 13th and 14th avenues, will have one-, two- and three-bedroom units. It's expected to be completed by early 2019.

"The close proximity to Denver's Golden Triangle and downtown amenities make TriVista on Speer ideal for a luxury apartment development," says Spencer Stuart, senior managing director of Legacy Partners, which is partnering with USAA Real Estate Company on the project. "The community is being planned to be amenity rich and to accommodate a healthy work/life balance for residents that work directly from home, in the community's shared office space or elsewhere in the Denver area."

Designed by the Denver office of architecture firm KTGY, the units will feature stone countertops, stainless steel appliances and gas stoves. A business center will provide onsite office space. The project also includes an outdoor pool and lounge; roof and sun decks with mountain views; a two-level fitness center with spin room and yoga studio; demonstration kitchen and wine cellar with individual lockers; dog spa; bicycle repair shop; and storage area for bike and ski equipment.

Contact Confluence Denver Development News Editor Margaret Jackson with tips and leads for future stories at margaret@confluence-denver.com.

Stonebridge wins Emerging Company award

Denver-based hotel developer and operator Stonebridge Companies has received the Emerging Company award from the Association for Corporate Growth as a result of its continued profitability, social responsibility and community service.

Each year, the association grants awards to two Colorado companies that demonstrate excellence in growth strategies surrounding their markets, growth, customers or products and that display social responsibility and community involvement. The companies must have annual revenue between $10 million and $100 million.

"Stonebridge rises above all entries for its excellent management and long-term strategic execution on its growth plans," says Joanne Baginski, partner at EKS&H and chair of the corporate growth awards committee. "The company truly represents the spirit of these awards through its commitment to corporate growth in Colorado."

Stonebridge also was recently awarded the Marriott Spirit to Serve award in recognition of its community involvement and global awareness.

"We feel very proud to be the recipient of such a notable local award," says Navin Dimond, president and CEO of Stonebridge. "Through our commitment to our distinguished hospitality brand, our mission is not merely about growth as a company but also to contribute to and be active members of every community we represent."

Contact Confluence Denver Development News Editor Margaret Jackson with tips and leads for future stories at margaret@confluence-denver.com.

Old firehouse to be incorporated into hotel

Focus Property Group has broken ground on the new Hilton Garden Inn at 1999 Chestnut St. near Denver Union Station.

A 12-story L-shaped tower will wrap around the historic Denver Hose Company No. 1, which will be restored as part of the development. The hotel will have 223 guest rooms, banquet and meeting rooms, a fitness center and other hotel amenities.

"It is easy to take for granted the amount of development that is taking place in our center city," says Tami Door, president and CEO or Downtown Denver Partnership. "Yet every project has the power to transform neighborhoods and drive economic development. This is no exception. Taking into account the history of the Hose Company No. 1 building, the integration into this vibrant neighborhood and the support of our tourism industry, this project is an impactful and meaningful addition to the landscape."

Built in 1882 for Denver's Volunteer Fire Department, the 3,224-square-foot building served the neighborhood known as the Bottoms, which today is part of the Central Platte Valley. By 1922, it had been converted into a print shop and later a welding shop, a purpose it continued to serve until at least the 1980s.

The building's architecture is representative of 19th century industrial construction and has only been slightly modified. Most of its significant exterior features are intact. 

Denver architecture firm Johnson Nathan Strohe is working with BOSS Architecture to redesign Hose Company No. 1 into a restaurant, pending the approval of the Denver Landmark Preservation Commission.

Contact Confluence Denver Development News Editor Margaret Jackson with tips and leads for future stories at margaret@confluence-denver.com.

Colorado Lending Source boasts $346 million economic impact

Colorado Lending Source injected $346 million into the state's economy last year through approving a total of 270 business loans that helped created 1,845 jobs.

The not-for-profit business lender, which shared its economic impact report at its annual meeting, approved the loans in 15 different industry categories spanning 130 unique types of businesses in 65 Colorado cities and 27 counties.

"Colorado is the best place in the world to live, work, play and start or grow a small business," says Mike O'Donnell, the organization's executive director. "Our entrepreneurs are all amazing, and we were thrilled to see so many people come out to celebrate our success and all small-business achievement in  2016."

Colorado Lending Source also presented awards to five entrepreneurs: Clear Intentions, Maria Empanada, Sample Supports, Sweet Action Ice Cream and Vortic Watch Co. Juana Gonzales from Mile High Delights received the Ice House Achievement Award for effectively implementing strategies taught in the Ice House Entrepreneurship Program and for launching her business as a result of the program.

Two banks also received an award: FirstBank received the Top SBA 504 Partner Bank Award for partnering with Colorado Lending Source on 23 SBA 504 loans totaling $45.9 million; and First National Denver received the Top SBA 7(a) Partner Bank Award for its partnership on 10 loans resulting in $9.1 million in financing.

Contact Confluence Denver Development News Editor Margaret Jackson with tips and leads for future stories at margaret@confluence-denver.com.

Regis joins Catalyst HTI

Regis University will join the health-tech innovation campus Catalyst HTI, slated to open in RiNo in 2018.

As a higher education partner, Regis' College of Computer & Information Science (CC&IS) will bring its expertise in health informatics, data science and cybersecurity to Catalyst HTI, collaborating with other health-tech industry leaders such as Hitachi Inc., the American Diabetes Association and the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus to transform the digital health environment.

"Regis is proud to be a partner in this new kind of health-tech venture at Catalyst HTI," says CC&IS Dean Shari Plantz-Masters. "It signals we are involved in helping solve problems within our society, which dovetails so well with the Regis mission of educating and inspiring our future leaders to have a positive effect on the world."

Catalyst HTI is an industry integrator, bringing together relevant stakeholders in health-tech innovation -- from single-person startups and Fortune 500 companies to nonprofit organizations and healthcare providers -- to build a community in which collaboration and integration lead to accelerated innovation within the industry.

"We are thrilled to have Regis University as a member of our community," says Mike Biselli, president of Catalyst HTI. "Regis is a leader in cybersecurity and the protection of health-care information. The College of Computer & Information Science's ability to attract industry leaders to join its faculty will help us accelerate our health-care innovations."

Contact Confluence Denver Development News Editor Margaret Jackson with tips and leads for future stories at margaret@confluence-denver.com.

Five Colorado architects receive AIA fellowships

Five AIA Colorado members have been elected to the American Institute of Architects College of Fellows in recognition of an exemplary career with a broad impact on the profession.

Those honored include:
 
  • Brian Chaffee, principal with Fentress Architects of Denver, who has led and designed projects ranging from the monument enclosure of the Iwo Jima Memorial to large and complex museums, headquarters office buildings, courthouses, convention centers and airports.
  • Charles Cunniffe, founding principal of Charles Cunniffe Architects in Aspen, who provided leadership for the Aspen Area Community Plan, Aspen's Civic Area Plan and Aspen's Municipal Facilities Master Plan.
  • Don Dethlefs, chief executive officer of Denver-based Sink Combs Dethlefs, who is known for his work on sports, event, entertainment and arena facilities.
  • Lawrence Friedberg, State Architect for Colorado, who has successfully championed the need for funding of public buildings by working with numerous governors and state legislators to refocus the state's deferred maintenance program to improve facilities throughout Colorado.
  • Mark Outman, principal with Fentress Architects, who has elevated the public experience of airport terminals and experiential civic buildings through architecture.

"The fellowship program acknowledges those architects who have made an extraordinary contribution to the profession and to society," says Cathy Rosset, executive vice president and CEO of AIA Colorado. "Each of these individuals has helped to transform the practice of architecture through community collaboration, solid management and creative problem solving."

Contact Confluence Denver Development News Editor Margaret Jackson with tips and leads for future stories at margaret@confluence-denver.com.

Logan House Coffee to open in Catalyst HTI

Logan House Coffee Company will open its second location at Catalyst HTI in River North.

Founded by friends Andre Janusz and Brooks Gagstetter in 2013, Logan House Coffee sources its beans from around the world and brings them to Colorado green to perform the roasting locally. Initially, Logan House Coffee was available only by deliver to customers' front doors and businesses. Recently the company added a retail location and moved its RiNo-based roastery to Stanley Marketplace in the Stapleton neighborhood. 

"We love the community focus of Catalyst," Janusz says. "We know how important community is to the success of a business, and we wanted to be in an atmosphere that offers a community feel -- a space that encourages work and creativity and engaging with those around you."

Located off the lobby in Catalyst, the 1,624-square-foot space will have a center counter and bar with style and finishes that reflect the RiNo neighborhood. Five Logan House roasts will always be offered on a monthly rotating basis, as well as beer, wine and specialty food items from local chefs, including breakfast burritos, pastries and charcuterie plates. The cafe will open early next year as part of Phase One of Catalyst.

"We are thrilled to be returning to RiNo, which has become the most innovative part of town," Gagstetter says. "And we are even more excited to be part of the premier project in the area."

Contact Confluence Denver Development News Editor Margaret Jackson with tips and leads for future stories at margaret@confluence-denver.com.

Preservery chef to appear on Food Network's "Chopped"

One of Denver's own will be appearing on Food Network's Chopped at 8 p.m. Feb. 21.

Dave Hadley, sous chef at The Preservery, will face off against three other chefs preparing a three-course meal consisting of an appetizer, entree and desert. In each round, they have to use all the ingredients the show provides them, even if they are a little strange. At the end of each course, a panel of three guest judges chops one chef sho doesn't measure up. The last chef standing takes hop $10,000.

Hadley has been cooking at The Preservery since the beginning nearly a year ago. He discovered his love for food early on after spending time in the kitchen with his grandmother. A graduate of the Culinary Institute of America, Hadley has worked for many of Colorado's esteemed restaurants and chefs, including Acorn and the first Biju's Little Curry Shop.

Hadley also loves to teach kids about cooking and has been known to give impromptu classes when young friends stop by. 

"The Preservery is very proud to call him a leader on the kitchen team and grateful to benefit from his tireless drive, his attention to detail, his creative spirit and his passion and talent for making things taste delicious," says Whitney Ariss, co-owner of the restaurant. 

The restaurant will be closed the evening the show airs for a viewing party.

Contact Confluence Denver Development News Editor Margaret Jackson with tips and leads for future stories at margaret@confluence-denver.com.

DAM revitalization spurs exhibit on North Building's history

With the Denver Art Museum's upcoming North Building revitalization project, an exhibition on the renowned modernist building, its history and its future will open Feb. 19.

"Then, Now, Next: Evolution of an Architectural Icon" will feature historical photos, original architectural sketches, building models and project renderings to tell the story of the North Building's evolution.

The exhibition showcases architect Gio Ponti's original vision for the building and explores how the North Building has served an expanding and diversifying community since opening its doors in 1971. 

It also features the museum's future plans and outlines the guiding principles for the revitalization project: Responsibly managing and caring for buildings and collections, offering a superior visitor experience, unifying the campus and inviting the entire community to enjoy the museum and programs.

The historic Western American art galleries will close to the public after Jan. 29 for the North Building revitalization project. A selection of artworks from the DAM's collection will be on view at History Colorado in "Backstory: Western American Art in Context," opening March 18. Contemporary Western American art will remain on view on the second level of the Hamilton Building.

The North Building revitalization project is being funded, in part, by a $25 million pledge from Lanny and Sharon Martin, the largest financial gift in the museum's history. In recognition of the Martins' gift, the North Building will be renamed the J. Landis and Sharon Martin Building.

Designed by Boston's Machado Silvetti Architects and Fentress Architects of Denver, the revitalization project is estimated at $150 million. Key project elements include bringing the museum's renowned educational programs to the center of the campus, expanding gallery spaces for growing collections, including Design and Western American art, completing Ponti's original vision for visitor access to stunning seventh-floor views, exterior site improvements, a new welcome center and updating environmental and other key systems to current-generation technology.

Contact Confluence Denver Development News Editor Margaret Jackson with tips and leads for future stories at margaret@confluence-denver.com.
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