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Albuquerque asks: Why are our people moving to Denver?

The Albuquerque Journal wanted to know why so many folks from Albuquerque have transplanted themselves to Denver lately.

New Mexicans are moving here despite what the story describes as "long traffic jams on major roads that put Albuquerque’s commuter woes to shame and a median home cost that’s double Albuquerque’s."

The economy has a lot to do with it:

"Unemployment in New Mexico has ranked as one of the highest in the nation, registering 6.4 percent in June. Colorado, meanwhile, has been shattering its own state records, with a 2.3 percent rate in June. Colorado and North Dakota have the lowest in the nation."

But there's more, as one of the interviewed transplants, Andrew Webb, notes:

“There is a sense of vibrance and positivity,” Webb said. “It’s very exciting here right now.”

Read the entire report here.


 

Construction Equipment magazine offers comprehensive take on I-70's innovative jobs program

The innovative jobs program for the Interstate 70 renovation project was big news in the construction industry.  Illinois-based Construction Equipment magazine offered a suprisingly thorough look, showing how different constituenices value news differently.

It is a unique program, as the story points out:

"An estimated 350 workers will be drawn from the area and provided with training to build the Central 70 project now and a good career as time goes on."

The training is real -- and funded:

"Using a $400,000 federal grant received last year, CDOT will partner with Gary Community Investments (GCI) to provide more than $1 million for training and support programs, including child care so residents can take advantage of the training opportunities and jobs.  Last year the U.S. Department of Transportation gave CDOT – one of only nine other transportation agencies nationwide – permission to pilot a local-hire program for Central 70."

Read the whole story here.

 

LinkedIn ranks Denver fourth in U.S. for worker migration

The LinkedIn Workforce Report ranked Denver after Seattle, Portland and Austin.

Excerpt:

Seattle, Portland, Austin, Denver, and Charlotte gained the most workers over the last 12 months. For every 10,000 LinkedIn members in Seattle, 68.2 workers moved to the city in the last year  -- mostly from San Francisco, Chicago, New York City, and Los Angeles.

Seattle, Portland, Austin, Denver, and Charlotte are all cities that have a lower cost of living than cities like New York and San Francisco, and have access to the great outdoors. This is a trend we’re keeping an eye on. 

Read the rest here.

ARTnews covers MCA Denver grant

The $400,000 grant from the Mellon Foundation will fund "Animating Museums" workshops.

Excerpt:

The Museum of Contemporary Art Denver announced yesterday that it has received a $400,000 grant from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation. The grant will go toward a three-year program, “Animating Museums,” for which professionals from around the world will be brought to Denver to host a series of workshops.

"Animating Museums" will start this summer with a ten-day residency. The next year, the fellows will participate in a series of webinars related to their fields, and the year after that, they will realize a major project, which the museum said will likely be "a large scale festival or similar activation." Applications to become a participant in the program are currently available at a site launched by the MCA.

Read the rest here.

NY Times ponders "Peak Millennial" in Denver and other cities

The story wondered how much longer cities should focus on recruiting the generation.

Excerpt:

The flow of young professionals into Philadelphia has flattened, according to JLL Research, while apartment rents have started to soften in a number of big cities because of a glut of new construction geared toward urban newcomers who haven't arrived. Apartment rents in San Francisco, Washington, Denver, Miami and New York are moderating or even declining from a year ago, according to Zillow.

"Certainly the softening of rents is one sign that they are not coming in at the pace that people thought they would," said Diane Swonk, an independent economist in Chicago.

The debate is full of contours and caveats, but it really boils down to this: Are large numbers of millennials really so enamored with city living that they will age and raise families inside the urban core, or will many of them, like earlier generations, eventually head to the suburbs in search of bigger homes and better school districts?

Read the rest here.

Adelaide looks to Denver for lessons

An InDaily story looked at what economic lessons the capital of South Australia could learn from Colorado's capital city.

Excerpt:

In 2015, Denver was named as [most] liveable city in the west and the fourth-best metro area for science, technology, engineering and mathematics professionals in America. More than 38 per cent of Colorado's adult population has completed a bachelor's degree or higher. In 2015, Colorado was also ranked as the second-most entrepreneurial State in America.

Adelaide, like Denver, provides a very high quality of life, affordable housing, quality health care, a ready supply of commercial property for lease or purchase, friendly people, a well-educated work force, and many other attributes that mirror Denver's. Adelaide's countryside is very attractive, tourism is well targeted and events are significantly supported.

Adelaide Airport has improved quite dramatically since the 1990s. Adelaide Oval is a world class venue. So why hasn't Adelaide grown at anything like the very fast rate of Denver?

Read the rest here.

Fox News spotlights Denver women brewers making a statement

"Makin Noise: A Pussy Riot Beer" was first produced in December at Goldspot Brewing.

Excerpt:

Female brewers in Denver, Colo. are taking a stand against oppression, sexism and anti-LGBT sentiments by collaborating to produce a series of craft brews that will be released leading up to president-elect Donald Trump's inauguration later this month. 

The first batch of "Makin Noise: A Pussy Riot Beer" was produced on Dec. 28 at Goldspot Brewing. Kelissa Hieber, Goldspot's head brewer and one of the group's key organizers, told FoxNews.com that the goal of the project isn't about promoting anti-Trumpism (though she admitted to Westword that many felt "defeated" and "helpless" after the election) but rather to foster unity among likeminded individuals and beer lovers.

"Despite a kneejerk reaction to assume that an inauguration day release insinuates a protest to Trump, however our only desire for this beer to to insight a larger sense of community and to stand up against injustice," Hieber said.

Read the rest here.

Forbes profiles Havenly founder in "30 Under 30 2017" feature

Emily Motayed, founder of Denver-based interior-design startup Havenly, was a focal point in the 2017 edition of Forbes' "30 Under 30" feature.

Excerpt:

Many of this year's crop of impressive young entrepreneurs started a business to solve their own problem. Take 28-year-old Emily Motayed. When she cofounded Havenly with her older sister Lee Mayer in 2013, she didn’t know much about interior design -- other than that she couldn't afford it.

After moving into her first "big-girl" apartment in New York, she discovered that traditional interior designers weren’t interested in working within her modest budget. Working with a roster of more than 200 freelance interior designers, Havenly charges a flat fee that tops out at $199 per room.

The Denver-based e-commerce platform also sells furniture, allowing shoppers to buy a whole Instagram-ready look, from a chic coffee table (candles and all) to an entire dorm room. In three years Motayed and Mayer have grown Havenly’s team from 2 to 60 and raised $13.3 million in funding.

As the daughter of Indian parents, Motayed is one of 19 members of this year's retail and e-commerce Under 30 list who is either an immigrant or a first generation American.

Read the rest here.

Columbia Journalism Review talks to Denverite editor

Corey Hutchins of the Columbia Journalism Review interviewed Dave Burdick of Denverite for a podcast.

Excerpt:

About five months ago, a for-profit, hyperlocal online news site called Denverite launched in Colorado's capital with the feel of a national startup. Backed by a trio of investors in Business Insider, the news outlet is the pilot project for a potential string of sites in other cities.

Denverite does not yet have a business model, but will start experimenting with how to make the site profitable. On Election Day, for instance, the outlet will host a ticketed event at its downtown office. In the meantime, the news organization's team of about 10 journalists have been cranking out the news about Denver and its metro area of nearly 3 million people.

So what has the journey been like so far? Last month I sat down with site editor Dave Burdick, who left his job as deputy features editor of The Denver Post to run the new startup. We talked about the challenges of launching a hyperlocal, digital-only news product, how he's building new audiences, and what a potential revenue stream might one day look like. The man has a passion for local news.



Read and listen here.

CBC contrasts Calgary and Denver

CBC Calgary took a hard look at the story behind Denver's resiliency during the recent energy bust.

Excerpt:

Denver and Calgary have a lot in common. But while Denver is rising, Calgary is struggling.

Founded within 20 years of each other, both cities were 19th century western frontiers. Places built on railways, agriculture and oil. For decades, both cities followed a similar economic path -- including the highs and lows of the energy industry.

But then, just a little more than 30 years ago, both cities faced a crisis. Calgary went one way, and is still riding the energy wave. Denver another, leading to a thriving economy. 

Calgary could stand to learn a thing or two from Denver. Something that occurred to Calgary Economic Development, which recently sent someone down on a fact-finding mission to study the successes of the Mile High City -- named for the exact mile it sits above sea level.

Read the rest here.

Energy.gov previews the 2017 Solar Decathlon in Denver

A year to the day before the event, the U.S. Department of Energy posted a preview of the Solar Decathlon 2017 to be held in Denver.

Excerpt:

Zero-emission electric vehicles charge along the street. People walk along LED-lighted sidewalks. A commuter train drops travelers off from the airport to enjoy dinner at a corner café. And the houses? They're entirely powered by sunshine.

This might sound like a scene from the distant future, but it's not as far away as you think. Exactly one year from today, Solar Decathlon 2017 will kick off in Denver. The biennial competition challenges teams of college students from around the country to design, build and operate beautiful solar-powered houses that are ultra-energy efficient and balance innovation with cost effectiveness. Fourteen Solar Decathlon student teams are now hard at work refining their initial plans for houses designed to provide shelter after disasters, conserve water and achieve other goals.

The Solar Decathlon houses will join the landscape at Peña Station Next, a burgeoning "smart city" between downtown Denver and the airport that city planners began mapping out several years ago. The plan calls for adding 1.5 million square feet of corporate office space, 500,000 square feet of retail stores, 2,500 solar-powered residential units, and 1,500 hotel rooms to the space separating the vibrant urban hub from the nation’s largest airport in total land area.

Read the rest here.

Fox News spotlights Rise of the Rest in Denver

The story posed a big question: "What can other cities learn from Denver about how the rest can rise?"

Excerpt:

Today, we toured Denver on a bus to see an entrepreneurial ecosystem that, actually, compared to many places, is doing pretty well. According to the Kauffman Foundation, Denver is one of the top five cities in startup activity, and Colorado ranks fourth out of 50 states. Two decades ago, that wouldn’t have been the case. As we visit cities across the country, we often hear what's not working -- we need more capital, more connectivity, better founders.

While Denver is self-aware that they can do so much more, they're on an encouraging pathway to how a community can do its best. At lunch, Steve Case talked about the "three Ps" of the Web's Third Wave. In reflecting on Denver, I saw three Ps that have made Colorado a great startup community.

Read the rest here.

NY Times reports on veterans in Denver marijuana industry

Numerous veterans are working in security for Denver's marijuana industry, reported The New York Times.

Excerpt:

It's nighttime at the Herbal Cure, a south Denver marijuana shop and grow house tucked into a parking lot beside the highway. Inside is a marijuana bounty: thousands of dollars' worth of cannabis plants, boxes of marijuana-infused chocolate, jars of $360-an-ounce weed with names like Frankenberry, Lemon Skunk and Purple Cheddar.

Chris Bowyer, a lanky combat veteran turned cannabis security guard, is outside. He has a .40-caliber pistol on his hip and a few extra magazines stored away, and he is talking about his work on the battlefield. Not the one in Iraq -- the one in Colorado, where criminals seeking to breach marijuana businesses face veterans trying to stop them.

"This is my therapy," Mr. Bowyer said, heading for a place where burglars broke in recently. He checked a fence for signs of a new incursion, then headed to an office to note the night's activities in a rigorously organized logbook. "This is what we did in the military."

Read the rest here.

Next City spotlights workforce development in Denver

Next City reported on the decentralization and expansion of workforce development by the Denver Office of Economic Development.

Excerpt:

Before this year, there weren't many spots in Denver where an unemployed person could get help stepping back into the job stream. A small cluster of employment service centers were huddled in the heart of the city, but most of its 11 districts were largely unserved.

Now that the Office of Economic Development (OED) has decided to divide Denver's job training programs out to private contractors, the number of government-funded work and economic assistance centers will jump seven-fold, going from seven to nearly 50 and spanning across all 11 districts instead of only five.

"People can access these services where they're comfortable instead of traveling [into downtown]," says Denise Bryant, director of the OED's workforce development program. "We have contractors and subcontractors that are now actually in the community."

Read the rest here.

WSJ covers Galvanize's $45M raise

Denver-based Galvanize raised $45 million to expand its educational offerings, reported The Wall Street Journal.

Excerpt:

As more technical education moves to nontraditional programs, it has become increasingly difficult for recruiters to develop standards with which to assess and compare these nascent coding programs. Some academic researchers and trade groups are looking to create a standard database of coding boot camps and online courses.

Mr. Deters said that Galvanize does not aim to replace four-year programs but rather fill the gaps and help engineers be prepared with the skills most highly in demand in today’s workforce. He said the company is planning to collaborate with universities more in the future.

Currently, the six month web development program costs $21,000, while the data science program is $17,000. According to the College Board, the average price of in-state tuition for a public university during the 2015-2016 school year was $9,410. For private colleges, that cost was $32,405.

Read the rest here.
126 Talent Articles | Page: | Show All
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