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55 sports and recreation Articles | Page: | Show All

Tnooz reports on Denver pitch event for travel startups

Four graduates of the Travelport Labs Accelerator presented their business plans at the event.

Excerpt:

Wolo entered the program as a B2C "online bucket list community" company, but pivoted at the halfway point to a B2B company aimed at leveraging the power of bucket lists to improve corporate rewards and incentives.

Founders Ray Collins and Mike Swisher had just left another large accelerator program in South America where the team was one of more than a hundred in the program.

Collins and Swisher initially were hesitant about joining the newer, smaller Travelport Labs accelerator. However, the pair quickly appreciated the dedicated coaching and mentors the Travelport Labs program provided. And they loved Denver so much so that the team has now decided to relocate and base their business in the city.

Read the rest here.

CNN Money segment takes Ski Train from Denver

CNN Money covered the comeback of the Ski Train from Denver to the slopes at Winter Park.

Excerpt:

Beat the traffic and ditch the car: Amtrak's "Winter Park Express" takes skiers--and their gear-- from downtown Denver, Colorado, to the Winter Park Resort, literally steps away from mountain chair lifts. The train climbs nearly 4,000 feet above Denver, cruises through 28 tunnels and gets you back to the city in time for dinner.

Permalink here.
 

U.S. News & World Report pegs Denver second-best city to live

After topping the list in 2016, Denver was second to only Austin in 2017.

Excerpt:

To clarify a common misconception, Denver is not a mountain town. It actually takes at least an hour to drive to the Rockies. But there are some great places for recreating within a 30-minute drive of downtown, such as Red Rocks Park and Cherry Creek State Park.  

Some might say that Denver is experiencing a gold rush of a different color: green. After Colorado residents voted to legalize recreational marijuana in 2012, Denver has seen a surge in cannabis-related commerce, from dispensaries to magazines to high-tech paraphernalia like vaporizers, rolling papers, lotions and storage containers -- and the industry is just gaining speed. 

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Adelaide looks to Denver for lessons

An InDaily story looked at what economic lessons the capital of South Australia could learn from Colorado's capital city.

Excerpt:

In 2015, Denver was named as [most] liveable city in the west and the fourth-best metro area for science, technology, engineering and mathematics professionals in America. More than 38 per cent of Colorado's adult population has completed a bachelor's degree or higher. In 2015, Colorado was also ranked as the second-most entrepreneurial State in America.

Adelaide, like Denver, provides a very high quality of life, affordable housing, quality health care, a ready supply of commercial property for lease or purchase, friendly people, a well-educated work force, and many other attributes that mirror Denver's. Adelaide's countryside is very attractive, tourism is well targeted and events are significantly supported.

Adelaide Airport has improved quite dramatically since the 1990s. Adelaide Oval is a world class venue. So why hasn't Adelaide grown at anything like the very fast rate of Denver?

Read the rest here.

Broncos' Okung pens op-ed pushing athletes to invest in tech

Denver Broncos offensive lineman Russell Okung wrote an op-ed for SportTechie advocating that fellow professional athletes invest in technology.

Excerpt:

For decades, athletes have used the money they earned on the field to invest in projects off it, with plans to achieve financial security for life after the game. In the past, these investments were typically in steakhouses, car dealerships, or nightclubs; businesses in which athletes thought they could use their fame to directly generate business and incur large profits. While some athletes -- take Walt Frazier and John Elway -- have been extremely successful, many have learned the hard way that these can be fickle and risky investments. Unfortunately, it has also created a stereotype that athletes are unsophisticated in business and prone to unwise investments.

Now, some people are warning that venture capital funds and tech startups are the new steakhouses; money pits luring naïve athletes. Sure, some athletes have lost large sums of money as a result of reckless investments and typically, when this happens, it generates a lot of media attention because it reinforces the aforementioned stereotype. But this narrative ignores that investment failure is not the exclusive domain of athletes. It is, by its nature, a risky endeavor and all investors have the same obligation to be diligent, to self-educate and to consult industry and investment experts.

Everyone, not just athletes, needs to do their homework before investing. And athletes are just as able as anyone to do so.

Read the rest here.

Lonely Planet pegs Denver among 10 best U.S. destinations for 2017

The city was ranked no. 9 on the travel publisher's annual list for its sunshine, beer, access to skiing and hip neighborhoods.

Excerpt:
 
Home of the bearded and the buff, Denver's aspen-tinged allure has never been greater. The secret is out: ample sunshine, a brewery on every corner and an endless supply of adrenaline-firing fun are fuelling the Rocky Mountain rush. And those lofty alpine summits aren't the only highs in town -- revamped Union Station is at the heart of new developments like the Ski Train, which in 2017 will whisk skiers direct from downtown to Winter Park's powdery bliss. Throw a vibrant economy into the mix, and you get artsy districts like RiNo (River North) and LoHi (Lower Highlands), where you can replenish your calories in slow-food market halls, bookended by gallery hopping and a night out with some rootsy, denim-clad rockers.

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Outside looks at bike-sharing models in Denver and elsewhere

The city's B-Cycle system is a great value, the story concluded.

Excerpt:

An analysis by People for Bikes, a leading organization that advocates for new and safe bike infrastructure, found that public investment in Salt Lake City's Greenbike and the B-Cycle Denver program, on a per-trip basis, was far less than traditional public transit like bus or rail in those same cities. Both Greenbike and B-Cycle Denver's public funding subsidies amount to 10 percent or less of total trip cost. By contrast, Salt Lake's bus and rail system, called UTA, relies on 80 percent public funding per trip. Denver's equivalent RTD network is tax-funded at more than 70 percent per trip. Not only are bike shares achieving statistically measurable improvements in traffic congestion and public health, they're doing so at negligible cost to taxpayers.

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People profiles Feral founder

Jimmy Funkhouser of Denver's Feral Mountain Company was the subject of an "American Doers" video and profile in People magazine.

Excerpt:

It wasn't easy for 34-year-old Jimmy Funkhouser to leave his small hometown of Elberfeld, Indiana, and it was even harder to leave his nine younger siblings.

"It was hard. As the oldest, I’ve always had this sense of wanting to set an example," Funkhouser tells PEOPLE. "I think being the oldest naturally instills within you this nature of blazing a path."

This year, Funkhouser quit his 10-year corporate job, moved to Denver, Colorado and started on his mission for achieving his own American Dream -- opening a mountain gear shop.

Read the rest here.

LA Times covers the return of the Ski Train

A story in the Los Angeles Times mapped out the new train-to-train route from Denver International Airport to the slopes at Winter Park.

Excerpt:

After a seven-year hiatus, Colorado’s ski train, which ran from Denver to the Winter Park ski resort from 1940 to 2009, is back. 

The train, a longtime tradition in the Centennial State, will begin making runs beginning Jan. 7 and will continue every weekend and holiday through March 26.

Thanks to a new commuter line running from Denver International Airport (DEN) to Union Station in downtown Denver, from which the Winter Park Express departs, visiting skiers and snowboarders can get to Winter Park Resort without renting or even getting into a car during their stay.

Read the rest here.

TimeOut calls Denver fifth-best city lo live in the U.S.

Denver ranked on the list high due to its parks, proximity to the Rockies, transit, music and beer -- plus legal marijuana.

Excerpt:

Denver is one of the fastest-growing cities in the nation, boasting 83,000 new residents since 2010. Educated millennials lead the charge, drawn to Denver's cool music scene, dozens of breweries, public transportation network -- including bike share -- and, in some cases, the legalization of marijuana in Colorado. 

Read the rest here.

Telegraph asks: "Is Denver becoming America's coolest city?"

The British newspaper peered into the city in a travel feature and came away with an appreciation for its beer, art and most everything else.

Excerpt:

The first permanent building in Denver wasn’t a church, a home or a bank; it was a saloon. Now, more than 150 years after gold prospectors first began to arrive, Denverites still clearly love their beer.

. . .

Simply strolling or cycling around the city (Denverites love bikes as much as they love beer) gives you an idea of the remarkable amount of choice here for hop-heads. There’s a German brewery (Prost Brewing Company), an English brewery (Hogshead), a hippy brewery (Vine Street Pub & Brewery), and even a heavy metal brewery (TRVE Brewing Company). For the truly thirsty, you can seamlessly link many of the best establishments together, on foot or bike, via the popular Denver Beer Trail, with free downloadable maps. The Denver Beer Fest, a nine-day gala of local brews held in the autumn, is an enjoyable way to tap into the scene, and the Great American Beer Festival, following swiftly behind, showcases more than 3,000 beers from across the USA at Denver’s Colorado Convention Center.

But it's not all about pints and pitchers: Denver as a whole is very much on the up. The second fastest growing city in the country after Austin, it’s also chasing down the Texan capital in the cool stakes too. A magnet for young professionals, the active and outdoorsy, it’s one of the youngest cities in the US too, with a median population age of just 34. 

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Skift profiles Visit Denver's experiential marketing strategies

Travel-trade news site Skift took a look at Visit Denver's creative marketing to Chicago event planners.

Excerpt:

Traditionally, destination marketing organizations (DMOs) like Visit Denver have emphasized their urban, hospitality, and transit infrastructure in their marketing messaging targeting big international associations.

Now, however, Denver is shifting toward more experiential and event-based marketing strategies to sell a more dynamic version of the Colorado conference experience to Chicago-based event planners seeking to bigger and better attendance driver.

Last month, for example, Visit Denver installed a re-creation of its famous Red Rocks Amphitheatre in the middle of Chicago's biggest food festival, Taste of Randolph Street, to host all of the musical performances. Located 10 miles outside Denver, Red Rocks is a massive geological formation with natural acoustics that was converted into a permanent venue for outdoor performances back in the 1930s.

Dubbed "Denver Live on the Rocks Stage," the pop-up event facility in Chicago consisted of two 76×30-foot rock wings and a VIP area for the region's top association conference organizers. It offered a more enticing way for event planners to mingle with Visit Denver representatives, versus a standard ballroom cocktail reception.

Read the rest here.

Denver cracks AAA's top 10 for summer travel

Denver cracked the top 10 list of the summer travel destinations from the American Automobile Association (AAA). At number 10, the city was just after San Francisco and Maui. Orlando and Seattle were respectively first and second.

Excerpt:

The great American road trip is back and AAA summer travel bookings indicate Denver is one of the top ten travel destinations. Nearly 56 percent of Americans are planning a drive vacation this summer, prompted by low gas prices according to a recent AAA survey. The lowest summertime gas prices in 11 years are prompting Americans to drive in record numbers.

Read the rest here.

AP story explores Brighton Boulevard in RiNo

A recent Associated Press story looked at the "emerging hipster Denver 'hood" along Brighton Boulevard in RiNo.

Excerpt:

A busy street connecting downtown Denver to the interstate, roaring with trucks and running alongside railroad tracks, might not sound like a trendy neighborhood in the making. But now's the time to visit Brighton Boulevard before it begins to look too much like any hipster street in any other city. It offers a close connection to Denver's gritty roots, as well a glimpse of what's coming, along with eateries, entertainment and more.

Read the rest here.

Economy essay on Denver spans "cranes, costumes, craft beer and cannabis"

A "My City" essay on Denver from local engineer/musician John Runnels was headlined "cranes, costumes, craft beer and cannabis."

Excerpt:

With so much to do, new people move here every day. Just from the vibrations the city gives off, it’s obvious that the economy is doing well.

Having worked both as a professional musician and as an engineer designing buildings, I have an interesting perspective on what that economy looks like.

Strangely, both jobs are similar in the way the bigger economic picture affects them. Live music is a luxury and usually one of the first expenses cut when budgets are tight. As an engineer, you’re one of the first to know when new buildings are on the way. For me it was extremely noticeable when the recession was coming to an end in 2011. Since then it’s only been an upward trend, evidenced by all that construction and the flourishing music scene.

Read the rest here.
55 sports and recreation Articles | Page: | Show All
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