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CNN highlights new Punch Bowl Social in old Stapleton control tower

CNN had some fun in its travel section telling folks about the new Punch Bowl Social that took over the abandoned air traffic control tower at the former Stapleton Airport.

The new establishment "combines diner-style food, bowling, karaoke and stunning views of Denver below." the report said.

The airport closed in 1995 and several plans were considered to keep it from demolition. The city approached Punch Bowl Social, which liked the challenge of a unique renovation. 

"Designing and reusing a former airport tower is a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to enhance an iconic municipal structure while revitalizing that which was once abandoned," says Rebecca Stone, managing principal at 
OZ Architecture, who worked on the project on behalf of Punch Bowl.

Read the whole story and see CNN's entertaining photos here.


Bloomberg says marijuana jobs are causing a shortage of restaurant workers in Denver

Bloomberg says marijuana jobs are causing a shortage of restaurant workers in Denver

Here's an excerpt:

The pot industry is taking a toll on local restaurant work forces and in some cases, liquor sales. “No one is talking about it,” said Bobby Stuckey, the James Beard award winning co-owner of Frasca Food and Wine in Boulder and the soon-to-open  Tavernetta in Denver. “But Colorado’s restaurant labor market is in Defcon 5 right now, because of weed facilities.” 

Denver’s population has been steadily growing. In 2016, U.S. News & World Report ranked it as the best place to live in the country because of its proximity to the great outdoors, along with the tech boom, among other things. The city is particularly popular with millennials. A boom in restaurants soon followed, transforming a sleepy culinary scene into a particularly vibrant one. (Another reason for the expanding dining scene is the $54 million Union Station renovation, which opened in 2014 and brought a concentration of fine dining spots downtown.) 

Read the rest here.


DIA food tops RewardExpert airport dining list

Denver International Airport beat out second-place Sky Harbor International Airport in Phoenix.


Denver International Airport comes in at number one for the RewardExpert restaurant rankings by a comfortable margin. Ranked the highest in overall quality and second in price and variety, the DIA offers a breadth of excellent choices at a low price. The field-to-fork Root Down has a 4 and a half star rating with more than 1,000 reviews to its name.

Read the rest here.

AP story delves into the history and present of Five Points, Denver's "Harlem of the West"

The Associated Press story looked at the rich legacy of jazz, African-American history and the neighborhood's modern-day boom.

Denver's Five Points isn't the only historically black enclave changed by population shifts and revitalization. In New York, neighborhoods like Harlem and Brooklyn's Fort Greene have lost black residents as rents have risen. Seminal black-owned landmarks, like Harlem's Lenox Lounge, have shuttered. Activists in Houston's Freeman's Town have worked to prevent brick streets laid by former slaves from being uprooted despite development pressures.

On the other hand, some of Five Points' new businesses are opening in storefronts that have long sat empty, and they're making an effort to recognize the neighborhood's roots.

The 715 Club, founded by the son of a Pullman porter at the corner of Welton and 26th, had been closed for years before a 2016 reopening. "We are a neighborhood bar in the heart of 5 Points trying to preserve a piece of Welton history," the new owners say on their Facebook page.

Read the rest here.

Cooking Channel chows at Biker Jim's

The segment sampled some of the more exotic hot dogs at Denver's one and only Biker Jim's.


"Biker Jim's is a place in a class of its own," says restaurateur Bradley Rubin. "What this guy's doing with sausages, nobody else is doing, I'm telling you. Nobody's coming close."

Watch it here.

Mayor Hancock gives Denver travel tips to U.S. News & World Report

His picks included LoDo, the Denver Art Museum and Red Rocks.


Denver Mayor Michael Hancock has been a key force behind efforts to ramp up tourism in the Mile High City since being elected in 2011, working to expand direct flights to Denver International Airport and improve the airport's facilities. A longtime Denver resident now in his second term, Hancock has seen firsthand how much the city has grown and changed over the years. He says Denver has a special quality that makes the city unique.

"There’s a certain spirit in this city you don’t find everywhere," he tells U.S. News. "It’s a very optimistic, forward-thinking, positive spirit that permeates every sector and every individual."

. . .

Describe your perfect day in Denver.

My family and I would go have brunch at Snooze or one of the great diners in Denver, like the Denver Diner downtown. Then we would go walk the dogs in City Park. Then maybe we’d go to the Denver Zoo, which is well-respected around the country. The primates and the elephants are my favorite animal exhibits. At night, we’d have dinner, then we would go find somewhere to enjoy live music because Denver has more live music venues than Austin, Texas. I love listening to jazz at El Chapultepec and Jazz at Jacks. The Soiled Dove Underground in [the neighborhood of] Lowry has great sound and gets some national acts.

Read the rest here.

Christian Science Monitor reports on GrowHaus

Christian Science Monitor covered The GrowHaus, a nonprofit indoor farm in Elyria-Swansea.


"How can we say that we have this amazing, healthy city, and boast our outdoors life, but we have these communities that don’t have access to healthy food?" says Coby Gould, executive director and cofounder of The GrowHaus. "We are a food-based organization, but ultimately we’re a community development organization -- and we use food as the tool, food as the lens."

The GrowHaus is based in a rehabbed, 20,000-square-foot space that was formerly a flower distribution center. It's surrounded by factories, highways, and rail lines, and the whistle of a freight train interrupted Mr. Gould's comments.

Read the rest here.

Fox News spotlights Denver women brewers making a statement

"Makin Noise: A Pussy Riot Beer" was first produced in December at Goldspot Brewing.


Female brewers in Denver, Colo. are taking a stand against oppression, sexism and anti-LGBT sentiments by collaborating to produce a series of craft brews that will be released leading up to president-elect Donald Trump's inauguration later this month. 

The first batch of "Makin Noise: A Pussy Riot Beer" was produced on Dec. 28 at Goldspot Brewing. Kelissa Hieber, Goldspot's head brewer and one of the group's key organizers, told FoxNews.com that the goal of the project isn't about promoting anti-Trumpism (though she admitted to Westword that many felt "defeated" and "helpless" after the election) but rather to foster unity among likeminded individuals and beer lovers.

"Despite a kneejerk reaction to assume that an inauguration day release insinuates a protest to Trump, however our only desire for this beer to to insight a larger sense of community and to stand up against injustice," Hieber said.

Read the rest here.

NY Times explores real estate in RiNo

RiNo's development boom was the subject of a recent story in the New York Times.


Among the unconventional work spaces and restaurants in the district, known as RiNo and north of downtown, is Comal, a lunch spot with Latin American cuisine where women from low-income backgrounds are learning how to run a business. In RiNo's recently opened Denver Central Market, shoppers can grab a sandwich, coffee or fresh fish,or sit at a bar and take in the scene.

The neighborhood has attracted artists who helped gentrify the old and neglected industrial expanse, which in its dilapidated condition was long considered the back door into downtown from westbound I-70.

Business promoters now want to create an international trade hub in the district and are ready to capitalize on what they see as one of Denver's last development frontiers. The developer Sean Campbell and World Trade Center Denver, a nonprofit organization that helps regional businesses, have proposed building a $200 million international business campus in RiNo.

Read the rest here.

Lonely Planet pegs Denver among 10 best U.S. destinations for 2017

The city was ranked no. 9 on the travel publisher's annual list for its sunshine, beer, access to skiing and hip neighborhoods.

Home of the bearded and the buff, Denver's aspen-tinged allure has never been greater. The secret is out: ample sunshine, a brewery on every corner and an endless supply of adrenaline-firing fun are fuelling the Rocky Mountain rush. And those lofty alpine summits aren't the only highs in town -- revamped Union Station is at the heart of new developments like the Ski Train, which in 2017 will whisk skiers direct from downtown to Winter Park's powdery bliss. Throw a vibrant economy into the mix, and you get artsy districts like RiNo (River North) and LoHi (Lower Highlands), where you can replenish your calories in slow-food market halls, bookended by gallery hopping and a night out with some rootsy, denim-clad rockers.

Read the rest here.

Inc. tells Punch Bowl Social founder's comeback story

Denver-based Robert Thompson took a winding road to success with his growing restaurant empire.


Don't be fooled by the case of pies in the front window. As you enter the diner in downtown Denver at 8 p.m. on a Friday, the gold booths, open kitchen, and chicken 'n' waffles are only a teaser for the adult playground ahead. The thump of Ol' Dirty Bastard lures you through to Punch Bowl Social's cavernous main hall, 23,000 square feet of fun. At its center is a circular bar lit by a massive antler chandelier, where bushy-bearded, tattooed bartenders serve local brews, craft cocktails, and elder-flower-spiked punch to a crowd of hipster parents and their heirs apparent. Drink in hand, it's time to choose your own adventure. A couple of rounds of bowling, perhaps, in one of eight dimly lit lanes adorned with vintage fox-hunting prints? A private karaoke room? A game of bocce? You wander upstairs, where there's another bar, dozens of 1980s arcade games, Ping-Pong and pool tables, and low banquettes that, as the night wears on, become the backdrop for more sloppy public making out than you've encountered anywhere else in post-collegiate life.

While this scene might not be everyone's idea of a good time, anyone trying to sell to the elusive, highly sought-after 20- and 30-somethings marketers love to refer to as Millennials will want to take notes. Every detail a guest sees, hears, tastes, and experiences at Punch Bowl is part of a well-honed formula for fun engineered by weathered restaurant vet Robert Thompson.

Thompson, who sports a shaved head and an expression that reliably hovers between a squint and a scowl, is hardly a poster boy for the type of carefree good times he's spent his career designing for others. "I can't have fun when I'm here," concedes Thompson, who would rather stay home with his wife and two young sons on Friday night than soak up the endorphins at one of his eight Punch Bowl locations scattered in cities throughout the country. "All I see are the cigarette butts in the parking lot," he nitpicks. "I notice when booths aren't perfectly aligned with light fixtures, if the music levels aren't right for the time of day, whether the hostess ran over to open the door, if the servers are smiling."

Read the rest here.

Zagat tabs Denver as no. 3 food city in U.S.

Only Washington, D.C., and Los Angeles topped Denver on the 25-city list.


The best city for singles. For millennials. For entrepreneurs. For outdoorspeople. Over the past few years, Denver has ranked at or near the top of virtually every U.S. index there is; it was only a matter of time before outsiders "discovered" its dynamic dining scene too. This year alone, Nobu MatsuhisaGregory GourdetDeborah Schneider and Hugh Acheson staked claims here; Jeffrey Wall of Atlanta's Kimball House is on his way, and so is the team behind New York's Death & Co.

Meanwhile, there's no stopping our homegrown talent. Beard award-winners Bobby Stuckey and Lachlan Mackinnon-Patterson (Frasca) will be opening Tavernetta soon; fellow recipient Jennifer Jasinski (Rioja et al.) is expanding her mini empire with Ultreia. 

Read the rest here.

Chicago Tribune explores Denver food markets

The story looked at The Source, Avanti, Union Station and Central Market, as well as Aurora's Stanley Marketplace.


Ask anyone who has lived for at least a few years in this gateway to the Rocky Mountains, and they'll say Denver has changed.

It's younger and edgier, and it bubbles with an energy wholly absent when the city was "nothing but a big ol' cow town in the early '80s," as one local said. Like most places, the change is principally seen in rising home prices (bad!) and a blossoming food and drink scene (good!).
But the food and drink explosion has come in one particularly broad and curious form: the food market.

Read the rest here.

High Times picks its favorite munchies in Denver

The cannabis-friendly magazine chose 10 of its favorite post-smoke eateries in the city.


Since legalization of cannabis in Denver, Colorado, the urban landscape has experienced a surge of marijuana enthusiasts and medical refugees alike looking to make a home in the Mile High City. Abandoned properties once stuck motionless in a state of decay have been revived by grow operations and newly legal businesses. What was once derelict has been brought back to life, breathing energy into the city streets.
Taking part in a cultural revolution can cause one to work up an appetite, so as one of those marijuana enthusiasts new to Denver, you might be asking yourself, "Where are the best places to eat while stoned?"

Well, we're here to help you find the best munchie fixes in the city with expert recommendations from a top cannabis chef, complete with pairing tips for primo pot strains  -- so get ready to blaze before stepping foot into one of these fine establishments!

Read the rest here.

Travelocity names Denver second-best beer destination

Portland topped the list; Denver was ahead of no. 3 Seattle.


Last year, in a Travelocity survey of 1,003 people, more than three-quarters of those surveyed said they would like to go on a trip where they visited craft breweries and sampled local beer. Recognizing this interest in beer tourism, Travelocity enlisted the expertise of the Brewers Association, a national trade association dedicated to promoting American craft brewers, their beers and the community of brewing enthusiasts, to find America’s best beer destinations by creating the first Beer Tourism Index.

Read the rest here.
144 Restaurants Articles | Page: | Show All
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