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179 Real Estate Development Articles | Page: | Show All

CNN highlights new Punch Bowl Social in old Stapleton control tower

CNN had some fun in its travel section telling folks about the new Punch Bowl Social that took over the abandoned air traffic control tower at the former Stapleton Airport.

The new establishment "combines diner-style food, bowling, karaoke and stunning views of Denver below." the report said.

The airport closed in 1995 and several plans were considered to keep it from demolition. The city approached Punch Bowl Social, which liked the challenge of a unique renovation. 

"Designing and reusing a former airport tower is a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to enhance an iconic municipal structure while revitalizing that which was once abandoned," says Rebecca Stone, managing principal at 
OZ Architecture, who worked on the project on behalf of Punch Bowl.

Read the whole story and see CNN's entertaining photos here.

 

Architectural Digest reports on Denver's proposed "supertall" skyscraper

Architecture magazines don't pay all that much attetnion to Denver, but a 90-story high-rise, proposed for 650 17th Street got a lot of people talking.

If built, the structure would be the tallest in the city, "topping out at 1,000 feet, Six Fifty 17 would stand 286 taller than the Republic Plaza building, Denver’s current tallest at 714 feet," according to the magazine. It would house 84 luxury condos and 22,000 square feet of commercial retail space. 

The developer is Manhattan-bassed Greenwich Realty Capital. The designer is Uruguayan architect Carlos Ott, who designed the Opera de la Bastille in Paris.


See a rendering and read the entire story here.


Must read: The Nation magazine sheds a suspicious light on the Interstate 70 upgrade plan

The Nation presents a dark take on how the government's plan to bury sections of Interstate 70 in Denver could destroy the character of historic neighbohoods. In short, residents lose and real estate investors win.

"The CDOT’s plan would condemn 56 homes and 17 businesses—a more extensive use of eminent domain than was required for the construction of the highway in the first place. It would also sever the neighborhoods during the decade of construction and open them to land-grabbing by developers."

The plan, the story contends, is an update of redlining because it would make many homeowners ineligible for FHA mortgages. 

"It already appears to be working. In addition to direct displacement by eminent domain, home values in GES have increased by 68 percent in the last two years (compared to 30 percent in the rest of Denver). This has displaced the neighborhoods’ renters, who are uniquely precarious—over 50 percent have no lease at all—as well as longtime homeowners who cannot afford the increased property taxes. The stormwater component of the plan also places Globeville back into the 100-year floodplain, making homeowners ineligible for FHA loans. The redlining returns."

Read author Caroline Tracey's full report here.
 

A quick hit from Forbes puts Denver at top of warehouse development

Denver apparently leads the nation in leased warehose space currently under development.

According to Forbes:

"The top 10 markets with the most warehouse space under construction include Denver, Kansas City, Chicago and Indianapolis. In Denver, 70.3% of the space under construction is pre-leased, followed by 54% in Kansas City, 51.3% in Chicago, 50.6% in Indianapolis and 43.4% in New Jersey."

Read the whole story here.

New York Times features Denver renter in story about evolving Airbnb rules

The New York Times set its story about Airbnb's evovling business model in Denver. North Park Hill's Jill Bishop serves as the perfect anecdote for a piece about how the profile of renters has changed as the company has sharpened the services it offers.

The piece starts like this:

"For nine years, Jill Bishop enjoyed the camaraderie of renting out her spare bedroom on Airbnb.Guests hung out on her comfy sofas. They dined together. They shared her bathroom, which was filled with half-empty shampoo bottles and an array of lotions.
Then, things changed.
Airbnb urged Ms. Bishop to make the bathroom look more like a hotel. New local regulations governing Airbnb meant she had to start collecting city lodging taxes, which made her feel awkward when she had to ask guests for money. And Airbnb began conditioning her to host people who are just looking for a place to sleep — not a home to share."

You can read the rest here.
 

Urban Land Institute credits Denver as one of several "smart cities"

The Urban Land Institute, a thought leader in the development of cities, uses the Peña Station Next development, near DIA, as its number one example in talking about the evoltuion of building technology.

An excerpt:

"Panasonic and local developer L.C. Fulenwider, which are partnering on the project with the city of Denver and an assortment of other local stakeholders, envision a dense mixed-use project—including 1.5 million square feet (139,000 sq m) of office space, 500,000 square feet (47,000 sq m) of retail uses, and 2,500 residences—that will double as a proving ground for exotic technology. When the $500 million project is completed in ten to 12 years, it will be a landscape where virtually every object—from lighting to parking meters—will be connected to the internet and equipped with sensors and/or cameras to supply a continuous stream of data to the development’s managers, who also will be able to control them via cloud-based apps."

It's a fascinating read that travels around the globe. Access the entire article here.
 

Minneapolis Star-Tribune reports of Denver-based Brickstone's new project

Brickstone is hoping to "demolish a 1950s office building on the north side of Lake Calhoun in order to build a 200-unit residential tower," according to the Minneapolis Star-Tribune.

The newspaper says the project is evolving: "The company now says that it wants to build an eight-story building that is 112 feet tall, down from its initial idea of a 13-story building."
 
 
Excerpt: "In August 2015, an entity associated with Brickstone paid the Ackerberg Group $8 million for the Lake Pointe Corporate Center at 3100 W. Lake St. The 50,000-square-foot building was built in 1953 and is known best for a colorful, nearly three-story steel sculpture on its driveway and a pair of oversized green Adirondack chairs on its lawn."

The developer still needs permission before it can move forward: "Brickstone needs a conditional-use permit from city planners to redevelop the property because the maximum height limitation in the area is 56 feet, or about four stories, and the site is within the Shoreland Overlay District, which further limits the height of structures to 35 feet, or about two stories."

Read the entire news story here.
 

ULC's Tony Pickett offers housing lessons to Oregon's Metro

Tony Pickett of Denver's Urban Land Conservancy recently spoke about affordability and equity in Portland.

Excerpt:

The Urban Land Conservancy, where Pickett has worked since 2013, has even more opportunity to create affordability in the Mile-High City. Started with a $15 million seed fund, the organization has grown over time to invest $70 million in 28 projects, generating over $400 million in redevelopment.

One of the conservancy's advantages has been the ability to move quickly to purchase prime sites as Denver undergoes a multi-billion dollar expansion of its rail transit system.

Pickett shared the example of the conservancy's Park Hill Village West development, on Denver's new A-Line commuter rail connecting downtown to Denver International Airport. Urban Land Conservancy purchased the site close to a planned station in a historically black neighborhood to create permanently affordable housing with easy access to the region's growing transit network. The development opened at about the same time as the rail line.

Read the rest here.

Inman offers tips for booming cities from Denver

The real estate news site looked at how housing inventory, affordability and other issues are being handled in Denver.

Excerpt:

Trends that metro Denver experienced last year due to housing demand are opportunities that real estate agents can leverage in growing cities such as Charleston, Houston, Raleigh, Fort Myers and Austin.

So, what can other markets projected to have skyrocketing populations in 2017 glean from Denver?

First, for perspective, our January 2016 market trends report stated: "Looking forward into 2016, the top concerns are tight inventory, home affordability, appraisal issues, tight credit and TRID." These issues all rose to the surface, and are the same issues facing many up-and-coming hot cities throughout the United States today.

Read the rest here.

Builder mag showcases Denver construction coworking space

The story looked at the innovative model of Tradecraft Industries in north Denver.

Excerpt:

Tradecraft Industries founder Bryce Ballew envisioned a shared office space where building pros can network and build relationships with others in similar trades. Memberships are offered for private and flex offices, mailing addresses, and storage units. Other features include conference rooms, continuing education programs, and estimating rooms.

Read the rest here.

Realtor.com pegs Denver as fourth-hottest housing market

The city ranked fourth on the list, after Vallejo, California, San Francisco and Dallas.

Excerpt:

"Spring has arrived early this year, at least in terms of the rapid decline in the age of inventory," Chief Economist Jonathan Smoke of realtor.com said in a statement. "Strong off-season demand powered new seasonal highs in prices and left us with a new low in available homes for sale. Potential sellers take note: This year is shaping up to favor you even more than last year."

Another indication of the continuing strength of buyer demand is that the median list price remains level at $250,000, which is a steep 9 percent higher than one year ago. If this figure holds by the end of the month, it would be a record for February. Buyers are also ramping up their search online: realtor.com saw the highest year-over-year increase in average views per listing since April 2015.

While nearly 425,000 new listings will have entered the market in February, there still aren't enough to meet buyer demand. In fact, the sharp double-digit decline in for-sale housing inventory observed since October is continuing.

Read the rest here.

AP story delves into the history and present of Five Points, Denver's "Harlem of the West"

The Associated Press story looked at the rich legacy of jazz, African-American history and the neighborhood's modern-day boom.

Excerpt:
 
Denver's Five Points isn't the only historically black enclave changed by population shifts and revitalization. In New York, neighborhoods like Harlem and Brooklyn's Fort Greene have lost black residents as rents have risen. Seminal black-owned landmarks, like Harlem's Lenox Lounge, have shuttered. Activists in Houston's Freeman's Town have worked to prevent brick streets laid by former slaves from being uprooted despite development pressures.

On the other hand, some of Five Points' new businesses are opening in storefronts that have long sat empty, and they're making an effort to recognize the neighborhood's roots.

The 715 Club, founded by the son of a Pullman porter at the corner of Welton and 26th, had been closed for years before a 2016 reopening. "We are a neighborhood bar in the heart of 5 Points trying to preserve a piece of Welton history," the new owners say on their Facebook page.

Read the rest here.

NY Times covers I-70 expansion controversy

The story delved into the environmental and health hazards associated with the project.

Excerpt:

Each morning Yadira Sanchez and her three children awaken to the roar of traffic and the plumes of exhaust that spill from the highway that cuts through their neighborhood.

Now, Ms. Sanchez and her family are confronting a plan to triple the width of this state's main east-west artery, sending tens of thousands more cars by their door.

Denver was the fastest-growing large city in America in 2015, with a population of nearly 700,000, and the scene of a tech and marijuana boom that has drawn 1,000 new households a month. But as in other cities, its highways have not kept up with development. Many roads are crumbling, leaving officials with decisions that will have lasting effects on the families living nearby, including residents of Elyria-Swansea, a low-income and overwhelmingly Latino community still reeling from the road's construction back in 1964.

Read the rest here.

CBRE Research tabs Denver as world's second hottest market for retail rents

Only San Francisco topped Denver, where retail rents are forecast to rise by 7 percent in 2017.

Excerpt:


Read the rest here.

NY Times gauges $1.9M worth of housing in Denver

The story compared properties in Denver, Santa Barbara, California, and Wayne, Pennsylvania. 

Excerpt:

DENVER

WHAT A condominium with three bedrooms and five bathrooms in a converted church

HOW MUCH $1,850,000

SIZE 4,815 square feet

PRICE PER SQUARE FOOT $384

SETTING This condominium is in a former Presbyterian church in the San Rafael historic district, about 10 blocks outside downtown Denver. With the exception of some commercial and small apartment buildings, the neighborhood is single-family, dominated by red brick houses, many of them Queen Anne-style. Shopping and dining are a few blocks away, toward downtown.

INDOORS The church was built in 1906 and converted to a residence between 2012 and 2014. It was designed by A. Morris Stuckert, an architect who built several houses in the district, though is probably best known for the Kittredge building, an imposing granite office downtown.

Read the rest here.
179 Real Estate Development Articles | Page: | Show All
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