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CNN highlights new Punch Bowl Social in old Stapleton control tower

CNN had some fun in its travel section telling folks about the new Punch Bowl Social that took over the abandoned air traffic control tower at the former Stapleton Airport.

The new establishment "combines diner-style food, bowling, karaoke and stunning views of Denver below." the report said.

The airport closed in 1995 and several plans were considered to keep it from demolition. The city approached Punch Bowl Social, which liked the challenge of a unique renovation. 

"Designing and reusing a former airport tower is a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to enhance an iconic municipal structure while revitalizing that which was once abandoned," says Rebecca Stone, managing principal at 
OZ Architecture, who worked on the project on behalf of Punch Bowl.

Read the whole story and see CNN's entertaining photos here.

 

Architectural Digest reports on Denver's proposed "supertall" skyscraper

Architecture magazines don't pay all that much attetnion to Denver, but a 90-story high-rise, proposed for 650 17th Street got a lot of people talking.

If built, the structure would be the tallest in the city, "topping out at 1,000 feet, Six Fifty 17 would stand 286 taller than the Republic Plaza building, Denver’s current tallest at 714 feet," according to the magazine. It would house 84 luxury condos and 22,000 square feet of commercial retail space. 

The developer is Manhattan-bassed Greenwich Realty Capital. The designer is Uruguayan architect Carlos Ott, who designed the Opera de la Bastille in Paris.


See a rendering and read the entire story here.


Albuquerque asks: Why are our people moving to Denver?

The Albuquerque Journal wanted to know why so many folks from Albuquerque have transplanted themselves to Denver lately.

New Mexicans are moving here despite what the story describes as "long traffic jams on major roads that put Albuquerque’s commuter woes to shame and a median home cost that’s double Albuquerque’s."

The economy has a lot to do with it:

"Unemployment in New Mexico has ranked as one of the highest in the nation, registering 6.4 percent in June. Colorado, meanwhile, has been shattering its own state records, with a 2.3 percent rate in June. Colorado and North Dakota have the lowest in the nation."

But there's more, as one of the interviewed transplants, Andrew Webb, notes:

“There is a sense of vibrance and positivity,” Webb said. “It’s very exciting here right now.”

Read the entire report here.


 

Atlanta Journal-Constitution comes to Denver to write about good transporation ideas.

People in Denver may complain about public transportation on those days when the trains run slow, but, from the outside, things look pretty good. The Atlanta-Journal-Constitution, exploring ways its home city can plan for future transit needs, found some good ideas at work here.

"It’s the kind of complex transportation network experts say is needed to address traffic congestion in booming metro areas. And Atlanta officials are paying attention to Denver and other cities that are building those kind of networks.Metro Atlanta’s long-term transportation plan includes many of the elements the Mile High City already has: bus rapid transit, new light rail and streetcar lines, an extensive network of toll lanes for congested highways and new trails to encourage commuting by bike and on foot."

The story includes a nice summary of the history of light-rail. A good read for anyone here who doesn't know the evolution of our trianst system and what it can teach us about making big, bold moves:

"The Denver Regional Transportation District opened its first light rail line – a 5.3-mile stretch along I-25 in central Denver – in 1994. It proved so successful RTD had to order six more vehicles to carry passengers."

Read the whole story here.

 

Urban Land Institute credits Denver as one of several "smart cities"

The Urban Land Institute, a thought leader in the development of cities, uses the Peña Station Next development, near DIA, as its number one example in talking about the evoltuion of building technology.

An excerpt:

"Panasonic and local developer L.C. Fulenwider, which are partnering on the project with the city of Denver and an assortment of other local stakeholders, envision a dense mixed-use project—including 1.5 million square feet (139,000 sq m) of office space, 500,000 square feet (47,000 sq m) of retail uses, and 2,500 residences—that will double as a proving ground for exotic technology. When the $500 million project is completed in ten to 12 years, it will be a landscape where virtually every object—from lighting to parking meters—will be connected to the internet and equipped with sensors and/or cameras to supply a continuous stream of data to the development’s managers, who also will be able to control them via cloud-based apps."

It's a fascinating read that travels around the globe. Access the entire article here.
 

ULC's Tony Pickett offers housing lessons to Oregon's Metro

Tony Pickett of Denver's Urban Land Conservancy recently spoke about affordability and equity in Portland.

Excerpt:

The Urban Land Conservancy, where Pickett has worked since 2013, has even more opportunity to create affordability in the Mile-High City. Started with a $15 million seed fund, the organization has grown over time to invest $70 million in 28 projects, generating over $400 million in redevelopment.

One of the conservancy's advantages has been the ability to move quickly to purchase prime sites as Denver undergoes a multi-billion dollar expansion of its rail transit system.

Pickett shared the example of the conservancy's Park Hill Village West development, on Denver's new A-Line commuter rail connecting downtown to Denver International Airport. Urban Land Conservancy purchased the site close to a planned station in a historically black neighborhood to create permanently affordable housing with easy access to the region's growing transit network. The development opened at about the same time as the rail line.

Read the rest here.

Skytrax ranks DIA as best U.S. airport

Skytrax has released its annual rankings of "The World's est Airports." At No. 28, Denver International Airports was sandwiched between airports in Barcelona and Vienna. Singapore was at the top the list, and Denver bested 10 other U.S. airports that made the cut of 100.

See the full list here.

DIA food tops RewardExpert airport dining list

Denver International Airport beat out second-place Sky Harbor International Airport in Phoenix.

Excerpt:

Denver International Airport comes in at number one for the RewardExpert restaurant rankings by a comfortable margin. Ranked the highest in overall quality and second in price and variety, the DIA offers a breadth of excellent choices at a low price. The field-to-fork Root Down has a 4 and a half star rating with more than 1,000 reviews to its name.

Read the rest here.

Expedia names Denver one of "America's most artistic towns"

The travel site included Denver in a roundup of artsy cities of all sizes.

Excerpt:

Denver is miles ahead when it comes to the best cities for art. Denver Art Museum houses diverse permanent collections from across the globe, and attracts world-class exhibits on the regular. Night owls should join Untitled Final Fridays (January through October), which include special programs, workshops, and “tours with a twist” after the sun goes down. RiNo (or the River North Arts District, if you're fancy) transformed warehouses and factories into galleries, working studios, and more than a few places to catch live music and a good drink. When you need a place to crash, hit up the ART Hotel, which seriously stays true to its name.

Read the rest here.

AP story delves into the history and present of Five Points, Denver's "Harlem of the West"

The Associated Press story looked at the rich legacy of jazz, African-American history and the neighborhood's modern-day boom.

Excerpt:
 
Denver's Five Points isn't the only historically black enclave changed by population shifts and revitalization. In New York, neighborhoods like Harlem and Brooklyn's Fort Greene have lost black residents as rents have risen. Seminal black-owned landmarks, like Harlem's Lenox Lounge, have shuttered. Activists in Houston's Freeman's Town have worked to prevent brick streets laid by former slaves from being uprooted despite development pressures.

On the other hand, some of Five Points' new businesses are opening in storefronts that have long sat empty, and they're making an effort to recognize the neighborhood's roots.

The 715 Club, founded by the son of a Pullman porter at the corner of Welton and 26th, had been closed for years before a 2016 reopening. "We are a neighborhood bar in the heart of 5 Points trying to preserve a piece of Welton history," the new owners say on their Facebook page.

Read the rest here.

CBRE Research tabs Denver as world's second hottest market for retail rents

Only San Francisco topped Denver, where retail rents are forecast to rise by 7 percent in 2017.

Excerpt:


Read the rest here.

ARTnews covers MCA Denver grant

The $400,000 grant from the Mellon Foundation will fund "Animating Museums" workshops.

Excerpt:

The Museum of Contemporary Art Denver announced yesterday that it has received a $400,000 grant from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation. The grant will go toward a three-year program, “Animating Museums,” for which professionals from around the world will be brought to Denver to host a series of workshops.

"Animating Museums" will start this summer with a ten-day residency. The next year, the fellows will participate in a series of webinars related to their fields, and the year after that, they will realize a major project, which the museum said will likely be "a large scale festival or similar activation." Applications to become a participant in the program are currently available at a site launched by the MCA.

Read the rest here.

NY Times gauges $1.9M worth of housing in Denver

The story compared properties in Denver, Santa Barbara, California, and Wayne, Pennsylvania. 

Excerpt:

DENVER

WHAT A condominium with three bedrooms and five bathrooms in a converted church

HOW MUCH $1,850,000

SIZE 4,815 square feet

PRICE PER SQUARE FOOT $384

SETTING This condominium is in a former Presbyterian church in the San Rafael historic district, about 10 blocks outside downtown Denver. With the exception of some commercial and small apartment buildings, the neighborhood is single-family, dominated by red brick houses, many of them Queen Anne-style. Shopping and dining are a few blocks away, toward downtown.

INDOORS The church was built in 1906 and converted to a residence between 2012 and 2014. It was designed by A. Morris Stuckert, an architect who built several houses in the district, though is probably best known for the Kittredge building, an imposing granite office downtown.

Read the rest here.

ABC News visits elephants at Denver Zoo

The segment looked at research that showed older male elephants teaching younger ones, and how it plays out with new living arrangements at the Denver Zoo.

Video:



Watch it here.

Adelaide looks to Denver for lessons

An InDaily story looked at what economic lessons the capital of South Australia could learn from Colorado's capital city.

Excerpt:

In 2015, Denver was named as [most] liveable city in the west and the fourth-best metro area for science, technology, engineering and mathematics professionals in America. More than 38 per cent of Colorado's adult population has completed a bachelor's degree or higher. In 2015, Colorado was also ranked as the second-most entrepreneurial State in America.

Adelaide, like Denver, provides a very high quality of life, affordable housing, quality health care, a ready supply of commercial property for lease or purchase, friendly people, a well-educated work force, and many other attributes that mirror Denver's. Adelaide's countryside is very attractive, tourism is well targeted and events are significantly supported.

Adelaide Airport has improved quite dramatically since the 1990s. Adelaide Oval is a world class venue. So why hasn't Adelaide grown at anything like the very fast rate of Denver?

Read the rest here.
176 Placemaking Articles | Page: | Show All
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