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ARTnews covers MCA Denver grant

The $400,000 grant from the Mellon Foundation will fund "Animating Museums" workshops.

Excerpt:

The Museum of Contemporary Art Denver announced yesterday that it has received a $400,000 grant from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation. The grant will go toward a three-year program, “Animating Museums,” for which professionals from around the world will be brought to Denver to host a series of workshops.

"Animating Museums" will start this summer with a ten-day residency. The next year, the fellows will participate in a series of webinars related to their fields, and the year after that, they will realize a major project, which the museum said will likely be "a large scale festival or similar activation." Applications to become a participant in the program are currently available at a site launched by the MCA.

Read the rest here.

Adelaide looks to Denver for lessons

An InDaily story looked at what economic lessons the capital of South Australia could learn from Colorado's capital city.

Excerpt:

In 2015, Denver was named as [most] liveable city in the west and the fourth-best metro area for science, technology, engineering and mathematics professionals in America. More than 38 per cent of Colorado's adult population has completed a bachelor's degree or higher. In 2015, Colorado was also ranked as the second-most entrepreneurial State in America.

Adelaide, like Denver, provides a very high quality of life, affordable housing, quality health care, a ready supply of commercial property for lease or purchase, friendly people, a well-educated work force, and many other attributes that mirror Denver's. Adelaide's countryside is very attractive, tourism is well targeted and events are significantly supported.

Adelaide Airport has improved quite dramatically since the 1990s. Adelaide Oval is a world class venue. So why hasn't Adelaide grown at anything like the very fast rate of Denver?

Read the rest here.

Government Technology looks at DPS Imaginarium

Government Technology magazine reported on Denver Public Schools' Imaginarium in a feature on innovation in education.

Excerpt:

At the other end of the spectrum is the imaginarium, an innovation lab launched last year by Denver Public Schools. Part of its reason for being is to counter traditional approaches to improving education, explained Peter Piccolo, director of innovation at the lab. "My colleagues are making sure the trains go down the tracks while I'm trying to build the rocketship," he said. 

There's also a big difference in the amount of money that governments are willing to spend. Gregory couldn't put a number on the cost of his program, but it probably amounts to little added expense. The cost of provisioning space on CalCloud is low. There is also the cost of the manpower of the developers. Currently, any other expenses are coming out of the state's enterprise IT fund, which already supports approved IT projects that are developed in the lab. But the program is brand new, and the state is still discussing how projects might be funded in the future, said Gregory.

The imaginarium, on the other hand, is a big investment. It has a staff of 20 and a budget this year of almost $6 million, with about $3.8 million coming from the school district and $2 million from philanthropies, according to Piccolo. 

Read the rest here.

Christian Science Monitor reports on GrowHaus

Christian Science Monitor covered The GrowHaus, a nonprofit indoor farm in Elyria-Swansea.

Excerpt:

"How can we say that we have this amazing, healthy city, and boast our outdoors life, but we have these communities that don’t have access to healthy food?" says Coby Gould, executive director and cofounder of The GrowHaus. "We are a food-based organization, but ultimately we’re a community development organization -- and we use food as the tool, food as the lens."

The GrowHaus is based in a rehabbed, 20,000-square-foot space that was formerly a flower distribution center. It's surrounded by factories, highways, and rail lines, and the whistle of a freight train interrupted Mr. Gould's comments.

Read the rest here.

Energy.gov previews the 2017 Solar Decathlon in Denver

A year to the day before the event, the U.S. Department of Energy posted a preview of the Solar Decathlon 2017 to be held in Denver.

Excerpt:

Zero-emission electric vehicles charge along the street. People walk along LED-lighted sidewalks. A commuter train drops travelers off from the airport to enjoy dinner at a corner café. And the houses? They're entirely powered by sunshine.

This might sound like a scene from the distant future, but it's not as far away as you think. Exactly one year from today, Solar Decathlon 2017 will kick off in Denver. The biennial competition challenges teams of college students from around the country to design, build and operate beautiful solar-powered houses that are ultra-energy efficient and balance innovation with cost effectiveness. Fourteen Solar Decathlon student teams are now hard at work refining their initial plans for houses designed to provide shelter after disasters, conserve water and achieve other goals.

The Solar Decathlon houses will join the landscape at Peña Station Next, a burgeoning "smart city" between downtown Denver and the airport that city planners began mapping out several years ago. The plan calls for adding 1.5 million square feet of corporate office space, 500,000 square feet of retail stores, 2,500 solar-powered residential units, and 1,500 hotel rooms to the space separating the vibrant urban hub from the nation’s largest airport in total land area.

Read the rest here.

Next City spotlights workforce development in Denver

Next City reported on the decentralization and expansion of workforce development by the Denver Office of Economic Development.

Excerpt:

Before this year, there weren't many spots in Denver where an unemployed person could get help stepping back into the job stream. A small cluster of employment service centers were huddled in the heart of the city, but most of its 11 districts were largely unserved.

Now that the Office of Economic Development (OED) has decided to divide Denver's job training programs out to private contractors, the number of government-funded work and economic assistance centers will jump seven-fold, going from seven to nearly 50 and spanning across all 11 districts instead of only five.

"People can access these services where they're comfortable instead of traveling [into downtown]," says Denise Bryant, director of the OED's workforce development program. "We have contractors and subcontractors that are now actually in the community."

Read the rest here.

HuffPost Black Voices video profiles Denver's DJ Cavem

DJ Cavem, a.k.a. Ietef Vita, and his pursuit of organic gardening and "kale life" were the focus of a recent video on Huffington Post Black Voices.

Watch the video here.

WSJ covers Galvanize's $45M raise

Denver-based Galvanize raised $45 million to expand its educational offerings, reported The Wall Street Journal.

Excerpt:

As more technical education moves to nontraditional programs, it has become increasingly difficult for recruiters to develop standards with which to assess and compare these nascent coding programs. Some academic researchers and trade groups are looking to create a standard database of coding boot camps and online courses.

Mr. Deters said that Galvanize does not aim to replace four-year programs but rather fill the gaps and help engineers be prepared with the skills most highly in demand in today’s workforce. He said the company is planning to collaborate with universities more in the future.

Currently, the six month web development program costs $21,000, while the data science program is $17,000. According to the College Board, the average price of in-state tuition for a public university during the 2015-2016 school year was $9,410. For private colleges, that cost was $32,405.

Read the rest here.

Technical.ly debuts video on Denver's tech scene

Technical.ly, a network of websites covering technology in a number of cities on the East Coast, released a video on Denver's tech scene made when it kicked off the Tomorrow Tour at The Commons on Champa in Feb. 2016.

Participants stressed that the city's uncommonly collaborative nature has helped catalyze an especially fertile startup community.


Video:




Read the rest here.

Business Insider lists 14 reasons Denver is the best place to live in the U.S.

Business Insider offered readers 14 reasons that Denver is the best place to live in the U.S.

Excerpt:

First of all, there are jobs. Strong aerospace, defense, biotech, healthcare, finance, and hospitality sectors create a wealth of positions, both in number and diversity. The city has also become a hotspot for millennials, bringing in fresh talent and energy. Between 2011 and 2014, nearly 3,200 new firms opened in Denver, driving down the unemployment rate and helping add more than 165,000 new jobs.

Read the rest here.

Metro State partnering with Detroit music school

The Detroit Free Press reported that Metropolitan State University of Denver is opening a campus at  the Detroit Institute of Music Education (DIME).

Excerpt:

MSU Denver administrators visited DIME last year for the first time, "and it was love at first sight," said Kreidler, who said he was particularly impressed by the faculty: "highly credentialed, extremely intelligent and good at what they do."

The new deal is part of a bigger growth strategy for Nixon and Clayman: A Denver campus is expected to open in fall 2017, next in what they hope will be several DIME-branded schools across the country. And there are plans to double the space at the Detroit facility, which now occupies three floors of a Dan Gilbert-owned building.

"It's our dream to have this place full and buzzing with young students," said Clayman.

Read the rest here.

Mic casts Denver as "unexpected startup mecca"

Mic published a piece on Denver's emergence as a startup "mecca."

Excerpt:

"There's largely a rejection of burnout culture here in Colorado," Espeland told Mic. "When you go to the coasts, you often see people working 20 hours a day and sleeping in their offices. Here, we value not doing that, and we believe that actually makes us move faster."

This environment is one of the reasons why Denver has quietly become one of the fastest-growing startup meccas in the United States. In 2015, Denver startups attracted more than $822 million in venture capital funding, with companies in the technology, energy, food and marijuana sectors leading the way. The city also routinely ranks as one of the best cities to live as a millennial, and young people from across America are flocking to the state in record numbers to build Denver-based business.

Perhaps the most remarkable part of the Denver success story is that much of the city's growth has taken place in only the past five years.

Read the rest here.

Technical.ly says Denver startup scene is at "tipping point"

Technical.ly came, saw and said Denver's startup scene is at a "tipping point."

Excerpt:

Denver's early IT sector developed out of telecom, government security and a unicorn or two. Celebrations of Denver's millennial boom and ensuing entrepreneurship boom all come with requisite mentions of the city's outdoor lifestyle, with its few hour drive to rich skiing and closer still to hiking and rock climbing. Josh Swihart, the cofounder of Aventeer and the CEO of Aspenware, joked that some of his team might get snowed in their homes on workdays yet be able to make it out to ski.

That fits neatly with ideas that Denver is a strong hub for digital health and fitness startups  -- more than 125 of them are in Denver, many of which may take space at the forthcoming Catalyst Health-Tech Innovation space.

Read the rest here.

AIGA Colorado posts video of Rick Griffith on mentorship

AIGA Colorado posted a video of Rick Griffith of Denver graphic design studio MATTER speaking about mentorship.

Excerpt:

Rick Griffith is one of the most promi­nent names in Denver's design com­mu­nity. Besides head­ing the renowned stu­dio and type lab­o­ra­tory MATTER the past 16 years, he is the Commissioner of Cultural Affairs for the City and County of Denver, and President Emeritus for Colorado's AIGA chapter. He has also spent nearly two decades teach­ing his craft to var­i­ous col­leges and uni­ver­si­ties in the Denver area.

"I've been lucky enough to have sev­eral men­tors," Griffith nar­rates. "Many, per­haps, unaware of the influ­ence they've had on me." In the video he explores the idea of men­tor­ship and its impor­tance in the career of design, all the while demon­strating a print process using tra­di­tional techniques.

"In some ways, the mentee is just as impor­tant as the mentor."

See the video here.



 

Tomorrow Tour coming to Denver Feb. 3

Technical.ly's Tomorrow Tour is coming to The Commons on Champa on Feb. 3.

Excerpt:

On Feb. 3, [Erik] Mitisek will be leading an innovation case study at Tomorrow Tour Denver, a stop on a national event series inspired by Comcast NBCUniversal and organized by Technical.ly. The series aims to explore and document how technology and innovation converge to strengthen the city. A free evening roundtable and networking event will connect local entrepreneurs, technologists, policymakers and new thinkers for discussions about the future of innovation and entrepreneurship. A key focus will be how to better articulate Denver's innovation stories and improve the economy.

"Colorado is becoming the undisputed technology and innovation hub between the coasts," Mitisek said. "Tours like this help get our message out of the community and reinforce the depth of great companies, founders and leaders in Colorado. This event is unique as it provides a forum, across industries, for leaders to convene and discuss the important topics for us to continue to build a next-generation entrepreneurial community."

Read the rest here.
18 Education Articles | Page: | Show All
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