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69 Creative Sector Articles | Page: | Show All

Urban Land Institute credits Denver as one of several "smart cities"

The Urban Land Institute, a thought leader in the development of cities, uses the Peña Station Next development, near DIA, as its number one example in talking about the evoltuion of building technology.

An excerpt:

"Panasonic and local developer L.C. Fulenwider, which are partnering on the project with the city of Denver and an assortment of other local stakeholders, envision a dense mixed-use project—including 1.5 million square feet (139,000 sq m) of office space, 500,000 square feet (47,000 sq m) of retail uses, and 2,500 residences—that will double as a proving ground for exotic technology. When the $500 million project is completed in ten to 12 years, it will be a landscape where virtually every object—from lighting to parking meters—will be connected to the internet and equipped with sensors and/or cameras to supply a continuous stream of data to the development’s managers, who also will be able to control them via cloud-based apps."

It's a fascinating read that travels around the globe. Access the entire article here.
 

PBS NewsHour covers "Mi Tierra" at DAM

The new exhibit at the Denver Art Museum delves into the Mexican-American experience.

Excerpt:

RAMIRO GOMEZ: It's important for me to highlight these people that are not going to be recorded in our history.

JEFFREY BROWN: In Denver, Gomez was one of 13 young Mexican-American artists chosen for an exhibition called Mi Tierra, their assignment, to create a new work that explores the idea of home and place in the American West.
There were smaller paintings and large installations, videos about the land before Europeans settled here, and a garden that looked like a giant pinata.

Many of the artists tackled the politically charged topic of immigration. This piece contained an actual panel of the U.S.-Mexico border fence.

RAMIRO GOMEZ: For me, place becomes a very difficult word to focus on, just because place is never permanent. We're constantly moving. It's constantly shifting.

I'm an American-born child to Mexican immigrants. So, I'm at once Mexican and American. I'm in between. That in-between space, that in-between place that I occupy is something that is constantly changing within myself.

Watch and read the rest here.

Expedia names Denver one of "America's most artistic towns"

The travel site included Denver in a roundup of artsy cities of all sizes.

Excerpt:

Denver is miles ahead when it comes to the best cities for art. Denver Art Museum houses diverse permanent collections from across the globe, and attracts world-class exhibits on the regular. Night owls should join Untitled Final Fridays (January through October), which include special programs, workshops, and “tours with a twist” after the sun goes down. RiNo (or the River North Arts District, if you're fancy) transformed warehouses and factories into galleries, working studios, and more than a few places to catch live music and a good drink. When you need a place to crash, hit up the ART Hotel, which seriously stays true to its name.

Read the rest here.

ARTnews covers MCA Denver grant

The $400,000 grant from the Mellon Foundation will fund "Animating Museums" workshops.

Excerpt:

The Museum of Contemporary Art Denver announced yesterday that it has received a $400,000 grant from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation. The grant will go toward a three-year program, “Animating Museums,” for which professionals from around the world will be brought to Denver to host a series of workshops.

"Animating Museums" will start this summer with a ten-day residency. The next year, the fellows will participate in a series of webinars related to their fields, and the year after that, they will realize a major project, which the museum said will likely be "a large scale festival or similar activation." Applications to become a participant in the program are currently available at a site launched by the MCA.

Read the rest here.

Forbes profiles Havenly founder in "30 Under 30 2017" feature

Emily Motayed, founder of Denver-based interior-design startup Havenly, was a focal point in the 2017 edition of Forbes' "30 Under 30" feature.

Excerpt:

Many of this year's crop of impressive young entrepreneurs started a business to solve their own problem. Take 28-year-old Emily Motayed. When she cofounded Havenly with her older sister Lee Mayer in 2013, she didn’t know much about interior design -- other than that she couldn't afford it.

After moving into her first "big-girl" apartment in New York, she discovered that traditional interior designers weren’t interested in working within her modest budget. Working with a roster of more than 200 freelance interior designers, Havenly charges a flat fee that tops out at $199 per room.

The Denver-based e-commerce platform also sells furniture, allowing shoppers to buy a whole Instagram-ready look, from a chic coffee table (candles and all) to an entire dorm room. In three years Motayed and Mayer have grown Havenly’s team from 2 to 60 and raised $13.3 million in funding.

As the daughter of Indian parents, Motayed is one of 19 members of this year's retail and e-commerce Under 30 list who is either an immigrant or a first generation American.

Read the rest here.

Columbia Journalism Review talks to Denverite editor

Corey Hutchins of the Columbia Journalism Review interviewed Dave Burdick of Denverite for a podcast.

Excerpt:

About five months ago, a for-profit, hyperlocal online news site called Denverite launched in Colorado's capital with the feel of a national startup. Backed by a trio of investors in Business Insider, the news outlet is the pilot project for a potential string of sites in other cities.

Denverite does not yet have a business model, but will start experimenting with how to make the site profitable. On Election Day, for instance, the outlet will host a ticketed event at its downtown office. In the meantime, the news organization's team of about 10 journalists have been cranking out the news about Denver and its metro area of nearly 3 million people.

So what has the journey been like so far? Last month I sat down with site editor Dave Burdick, who left his job as deputy features editor of The Denver Post to run the new startup. We talked about the challenges of launching a hyperlocal, digital-only news product, how he's building new audiences, and what a potential revenue stream might one day look like. The man has a passion for local news.



Read and listen here.

Wired flies with Denver aerial photographer Evan Anderman

A slideshow of shots by the Denver-based photographer showcase little-seen Colorado landscapes on the plains, and in the foothills and suburbia.

Excerpt:

Think of Colorado, and you probably picture the snow-capped peaks of the Rockies. But nearly half of the state lies on the high plains to the east of the mountains. The terrain is no less scenic, especially when seen from above.

"I love looking at the landscape and understanding how everything fits together," says Evan Anderman, who spends hours taking aerial photos from the cockpit of his plane, 1,500 feet above the plains.

His gorgeous images, taken during some 200 flights, capture the breadth of the plains and its industry. Fields of wheat, millet, and hay wave in the breeze. Cattle graze on rangeland. Factories, mines, and oil rigs dot the land. "Every square inch out there has been affected [by industry] in one way or another," Anderman says.

Read the rest and see the slideshow here.

Fox News spotlights Rise of the Rest in Denver

The story posed a big question: "What can other cities learn from Denver about how the rest can rise?"

Excerpt:

Today, we toured Denver on a bus to see an entrepreneurial ecosystem that, actually, compared to many places, is doing pretty well. According to the Kauffman Foundation, Denver is one of the top five cities in startup activity, and Colorado ranks fourth out of 50 states. Two decades ago, that wouldn’t have been the case. As we visit cities across the country, we often hear what's not working -- we need more capital, more connectivity, better founders.

While Denver is self-aware that they can do so much more, they're on an encouraging pathway to how a community can do its best. At lunch, Steve Case talked about the "three Ps" of the Web's Third Wave. In reflecting on Denver, I saw three Ps that have made Colorado a great startup community.

Read the rest here.

SI reports on Tom Brady's reaction to Denver-made Tom Brady mask

The New England Patriots quarterback called the hyper-realistic mask made by Denver's Landon Meier of Hyperflesh "probably the creepiest thing I've ever seen," reported Sports Illustrated.

Excerpt:

Yeah, it's pretty scary, and you can count Brady among those who thinks the mask lies squarely in the uncanny valley.

"I spent a little time with [Welker] on Sunday morning, he showed it to me," Brady said during his weekly Westwood One radio appearance on Monday. "It was probably the creepiest thing I've ever seen."

Read the rest here.

Daily Breeze reports on Toastmasters proposed move to Denver

The Daily Breeze looked at Toastmasters International's proposed move to Denver, and the fight to keep the nonprofit's headquarters in Torrance, California.

Excerpt:

"You hear about big companies moving out of California, especially to Texas," Chao said. "We have a couple of clients that have moved to Colorado. The even bigger driver is they can get into the housing market there. Prices are more affordable, and the real estate tax is less. And once they go there they realized they had a lower tax burden."

For companies, taxes are much lower in Colorado than in California. Colorado companies pay 4.63 percent of their company’s net income. California companies pay 8.84 percent, but also have a minimum amount they pay in taxes.

Nonprofits generally don’t pay taxes, Chao said. So moving to Colorado from Orange County would not offer any tax benefit to a group like Toastmasters, even though it may do so for individuals.

Read the rest here.

 

Interior Design magazine spotlights new builds in Denver

A story in Interior Design magazine shined a light on six new builds in Denver.

Within Denver proper, thoughtful new builds continue to emerge that counter a recent in-flux of arguably generic mixed-use, multi-family, and McMansion development. 4100 Bryant, a new single-family residence within the fabric of an urban residential neighborhood by Boulder-based firm Studio B Architecture + Interiors provides a fresh interpretation of the city's proliferation of mid-century homes. The seemingly linear home blurs the line between interior and exterior with the overt insertion of a bold centralized volume including an open courtyard made complete with a swimming pool.

Other notable projects include "The Boathouse," by Denver-based firm Shears Adkins Rockmore, a playful response to creating office space that captures a scale, character, and site response that appeals to Denver's large millennial population and informal culture. "Sushi-Rama," a playful Warhol-and-Lichtenstein-inspired design by LIVStudio is one of a smattering of new restaurants where the environment is as creative as the food. On the cultural front, the highly-anticipated relocation of the Kirkland Museum of Decorative and Fine Arts by Olson Kundig is slated to open in late 2017.

Read the rest here.

Denver videographer wins Murrow award for "The Motel Life"

KUSA Denver's Corky Scholl won a Edward R. Murrow award for his 2015 short documentary on the people living in motels as "a last resort" in Denver, entitled "The Motel Life," reported the National Press Photographers Association.


Video:




Read the rest here.

Dallas Morning News labels "Women of Abstract Expressionism" at DAM "a must-see"

The Dallas Morning News called the "Women of Abstract Expressionism" exhibit at the Denver Art Museum through Sept. 25 "a must-see."

Excerpt:

I review it because it will be nowhere near Texas, and for the many Dallasites who cool off in Colorado in the summer it is a must-see (it closes Sept. 25).

By now, we know well the art of three of these women -- Joan Mitchell, Helen Frankenthaler and Lee Krasner -- and we have important works by all three in the Dallas Museum of Art. But to that canonical gang of three, the Denver curator, Gwen Chanzit, adds nine artists, three of whom are just beneath the big three -- Jay DeFeo, Grace Hartigan and Elaine de Kooning. The catalog also documents the careers of 30 additional artists, each of whom deserves attention.

Read the rest here.

Punch spotlights Denver's TRVE in story on label design for craft beer

Punch included Baker's TRVE Brewing Company in a feature story on next-level label design in the craft beer industry.

Excerpt:

When choosing a name for his heavy metal-inspired, Denver-based brewing company, proprietor Nick Nunns chose TRVE (pronounced "true"), an inside joke in the metal-community poking fun at people who take themselves too seriously. When choosing an artist, Sam Turner was a no-brainer. "He's had a long history of doing work for heavy metal bands and, as such, he was the perfect person to collaborate with for our design aesthetic," says Nunns. "From day one, he's designed amazing labels for us that could easily be mistaken for album covers."

Read the rest here.

Skift profiles Visit Denver's experiential marketing strategies

Travel-trade news site Skift took a look at Visit Denver's creative marketing to Chicago event planners.

Excerpt:

Traditionally, destination marketing organizations (DMOs) like Visit Denver have emphasized their urban, hospitality, and transit infrastructure in their marketing messaging targeting big international associations.

Now, however, Denver is shifting toward more experiential and event-based marketing strategies to sell a more dynamic version of the Colorado conference experience to Chicago-based event planners seeking to bigger and better attendance driver.

Last month, for example, Visit Denver installed a re-creation of its famous Red Rocks Amphitheatre in the middle of Chicago's biggest food festival, Taste of Randolph Street, to host all of the musical performances. Located 10 miles outside Denver, Red Rocks is a massive geological formation with natural acoustics that was converted into a permanent venue for outdoor performances back in the 1930s.

Dubbed "Denver Live on the Rocks Stage," the pop-up event facility in Chicago consisted of two 76×30-foot rock wings and a VIP area for the region's top association conference organizers. It offered a more enticing way for event planners to mingle with Visit Denver representatives, versus a standard ballroom cocktail reception.

Read the rest here.
69 Creative Sector Articles | Page: | Show All
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