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Business Insider rates Sushi Den as one of 14 "sushi spots worth the splurge"

Old South Pearl Street's landmark Sushi Den is one of the country's 14 "sushi spots worth the splurge," says Business Insider.

Excerpt:

Fresh ingredients, specialty menu items, and a superb happy hour are just a few of the things that make Sushi Den "the best sushi restaurant in Denver," according to Foursquare users. How are the seafood ingredients so good, when Denver is totally landlocked? Many are flown in daily from Japan.

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Punch spotlights Denver's TRVE in story on label design for craft beer

Punch included Baker's TRVE Brewing Company in a feature story on next-level label design in the craft beer industry.

Excerpt:

When choosing a name for his heavy metal-inspired, Denver-based brewing company, proprietor Nick Nunns chose TRVE (pronounced "true"), an inside joke in the metal-community poking fun at people who take themselves too seriously. When choosing an artist, Sam Turner was a no-brainer. "He's had a long history of doing work for heavy metal bands and, as such, he was the perfect person to collaborate with for our design aesthetic," says Nunns. "From day one, he's designed amazing labels for us that could easily be mistaken for album covers."

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NY Times looks at Denver's many millennial lures

The New York Times looked at what's luring millennials to Denver, including openness, bars, transit and weed.

Excerpt:

The youthful party continues on many nights around the renovated Union Station in the trendy Lower Downtown district, known locally as LoDo, and along Larimer Street in River North, or RiNo. It was unclear on a recent evening whether there were more bars than signs supporting Bernie Sanders, but both were plentiful. Scruffy Murphy's Irish Pub, Los Chingones' rooftop bar and the Wynkoop Brewing Company (one of 65 microbreweries here, according to the Colorado Brewers Guild) were all doing a brisk business.

As for the Vermont senator, so popular with millennials, he was depicted on a two-story painted wall mural -- like something you'd see in Los Angeles or Belfast celebrating heroes -- with a fist raised and the slogan "Rise Together!"

This is also an apt slogan for this city, which has risen from economic stagnation and urban irrelevance to become a millennial magnet.

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CityLab includes Dairy Block project in story on alley activation

CityLab story on alley activation included Dairy Block, formerly known as Z Block.

Excerpt:

When it opened in 2012, the East Cahuenga Alley in Los Angeles swiftly drew crowds. The brainchild of a member of the Hollywood Business Improvement District, the plan for the lane -- once known as "Heroin Alley" -- re-imagined it as a pedestrian space filled with outdoor dining and an artists' market on Sundays. The Los Angeles Sustainability Collaborative compiled an extensive report on the space, Freedman says, to “put a spotlight on what happened in one community, to show what could be possible for others."

Though Freedman's organization focuses primarily on the Los Angeles area, the success of the East Cahuenga Alley model has radiated out to other cities. The [Dairy] Block office and retail development is slated to open in Lower Downtown Denver next year; the developer on the project told The Denver Post that the alley bisecting the site was as much a focus as the buildings themselves. While previous alley activations in Denver were limited to one-offs, the [Dairy] Block alley will play permanent host to a distiller, a chocolatier, a coffee-bean roaster, and an ice-cream shop, all of which will open out onto the small street.

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Streetsblog's Talking Headways Podcast talks Denver transportation

Streetsblog's Talking Headways Podcast covered Denver transportation issues as the I-70 expansion, the A Line and Colfax Avenue.

Listen:

 

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Guardian story delves into gentrification and white privilege in Denver

A story in The Guardian took a look at gentrification and white privilege in Denver.

Excerpt:

For the first time in its history, Denver is so crowded, so desirable, that the "endless" neighbourhoods of bungalows are proving finite. There’s not enough space for everyone who wants a front porch and backyard a stone’s throw from downtown, in a historic neighbourhood with a high "walk score" (the area’s walkability). The cost of this growth is the displacement of the city’s remaining working class, and the city government, cashing in on the boom, is leading the process.

While the neighbourhoods south and east of downtown have always been expensive and predominately white, until recently those north of downtown remained lower-income and mainly Latino, alongside descendants of other immigrant communities -- Italian, Irish, and Eastern European. North-west Denver, or Northside (which includes the neighbourhoods Highland, Sunnyside, and Berkeley), has the iconic grid: brick houses and century-old shade trees, interspersed with former "streetcar downtowns". It didn’t take much time after being discovered for the neighbourhoods to gentrify.

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Skift profiles Visit Denver's experiential marketing strategies

Travel-trade news site Skift took a look at Visit Denver's creative marketing to Chicago event planners.

Excerpt:

Traditionally, destination marketing organizations (DMOs) like Visit Denver have emphasized their urban, hospitality, and transit infrastructure in their marketing messaging targeting big international associations.

Now, however, Denver is shifting toward more experiential and event-based marketing strategies to sell a more dynamic version of the Colorado conference experience to Chicago-based event planners seeking to bigger and better attendance driver.

Last month, for example, Visit Denver installed a re-creation of its famous Red Rocks Amphitheatre in the middle of Chicago's biggest food festival, Taste of Randolph Street, to host all of the musical performances. Located 10 miles outside Denver, Red Rocks is a massive geological formation with natural acoustics that was converted into a permanent venue for outdoor performances back in the 1930s.

Dubbed "Denver Live on the Rocks Stage," the pop-up event facility in Chicago consisted of two 76×30-foot rock wings and a VIP area for the region's top association conference organizers. It offered a more enticing way for event planners to mingle with Visit Denver representatives, versus a standard ballroom cocktail reception.

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CoreLogic IDs Denver as hottest housing market

CoreLogic data found Denver home prices jumped by more than 10 percent year-over-year, according to a story in National Mortgage Professional Magazine.

Excerpt:

Among the leading metro markets, Denver saw the greatest year-over-year home price gains, with a 10.3 percent surge.

CoreLogic is forecasting a 0.8 percent home price increase from May to June and a 5.3 percent spike between May 2016 and May 2017.

"Housing remained an oasis of stability in May with home prices rising year over year between five percent and six percent for 22 consecutive months," said Frank Nothaft, chief economist for CoreLogic. "The consistently solid growth in home prices has been driven by the highest resale activity in nine years and a still-tight housing inventory."

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Lara Ruggles dishes on Denver music scene with Weld for Birmingham

Denver-based singer-songwriter Lara Ruggles discussed the local music scene -- and skyrocketing rents -- with Alabama alt-weekly Weld for Birmingham.

Excerpt:

Weld: What is the Denver scene like and how has it affected you as an artist? 

Ruggles: I feel like everyone has different experiences with any given scene, but I've been lucky to find the Denver scene very welcoming and collaborative. Everyone kind of appreciates and shouts out each other's work and I think Denver is so full of so many talented bands and songwriters that any ten people could be involved in a completely different music scene and have hardly any overlap of the bands they know.

I've noticed there is this thing among Denver bands where it seems like all my favorite bands have written at least one song in 7/4 [time signature]. I haven't fulfilled that challenge yet, but I think it's a worthy one. I love Denver, but it's hard to know where I'll end up after this summer's over -- unfortunately rent is rising so fast that it doesn't feel like a place I will be able to live.

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Milwaukee Mag drinks in Denver's beer scene

Milwaukee Magazine took a "barnstorming tour of the amazing beer city that is Denver."

Excerpt:

Denver is such an amazing beer city, and there are so many quality breweries to choose from that it can be overwhelming. Logistics and time prevented me from hitting a few places on my list, but I did manage a solid barnstorming tour. Here's the rundown (in order of appearance).

Black Shirt Brewing (3719 Walnut St.) resides on the edge of the up-and-coming RiNo (River North Art District). It's an outpost conveniently located one block from a light rail stop (that I took from the airport). Red ales are the specialty and they're pretty tasty, as is the Blood Orange Double IPA. The dark taproom is welcoming and has a rock vibe—Fugazi was playing as I walked in. It was a great start to the weekend.

I hiked a mile from Black Shirt to Spangalang Brewery (2736 Welton St.), which resides in a former DMV office in the Five Points area -- the name pays homage to the jazz heritage in the neighborhood. Co-founder Taylor Rees was the head brewer at Great Divide before opening Spangalang last spring. The spot offers a range of well-crafted styles. My favorites were the Lil' Confused Dry Hopped Wheat Beer, a crisp summer brew made with Hefeweizen yeast. The big, juicy fruit flavor of the D-Train IPA was also perfect.

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Nashville looks to Denver for lessons on funding transit

A Nashville Public Radio story reported on Denver's lessons for funding a transit expansion.

Excerpt:

For example, in Denver in the late 1990s, voters rejected a plan. Later, they approved a sales tax for light rail. That was only after advocates spoke to tens of thousands of residents, and found pockets of support among young professionals and, surprisingly, retirees.

"One of the biggest pockets of support were retired women over the age of 65, because they saw it as the first opportunity for them to come back into downtown and see a show at the performing arts center and have lunch together with the girls," said Kathleen Osher with Denver's Transit Alliance.

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Inc. covers Denver startup Notion

Inc. profiled Notion, the Denver-based startup that could save insurance companies billions with its home sensors.

Excerpt:

Compared to detecting a break-in, sensing a water leak may not sound like a terribly exciting feature, but Notion includes that capability for a very good reason: Water losses are responsible for $8 billion in paid insurance claims each year, according to risk assessment firm ISO. And even though most insurance policies do cover these accidents, no one wants to endure the weeks or months it takes to dry, gut, and repair a damaged home--not to mention the premium increase that's sure to follow.

Notion's devices are designed to help homeowners realize these leaks are happening before the damage becomes severe. Placing a sensor near some of the most likely sources of water escapes -- dishwashers, toilets, tubs, sinks, and water heaters, as well as in flood-prone basements or ground levels -- could help make sure a potentially massive spill stays limited to a mop-up.

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UPI reports on Denver company making wine for cats

A recent UPI story looked at Apollo Peak, a Denver company making such wine for cats as Pinot Meow.

Excerpt:

The non-alcoholic, beet-based cat wine was developed specifically for cats by Denver-based Apollo Peak.

Cats can enjoy the company's products in two varieties, including the red "Pinot Meow" and white "Moscato."

"All of our cat wine products have a proprietary blend that includes all-natural organically grown catnip, fresh beets and natural preservatives to help hold the taste and color," the company says on its website. "We believe in natural ingredients for our particularly classy feline friends."

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Yahoo! Finance names Denver a top city to start a career

Yahoo! Finance placed Denver on a list of the best five cities for starting a career.

Excerpt:

Denver
Like in Austin, the startup scene is really booming in the Mile High City. So much so, that it hosts a yearly event called Denver Startup Week which is described as "the summit of entrepreneurial energy, innovation, and connection." This year's event is coming up in September so maybe it's your chance to check out the city and see what it has to offer.  

Rent is a little bit on the pricey side, averaging about $1,300. But median household income is $66,870, higher than the national median income of $53,657. Your social scene may be thriving as well since Denver's population is made up of 15% millennials, placing it at the top of the US Census Bureau's list of top 5 cities with the highest percentage of young adults aged 25-34.

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Denver cracks AAA's top 10 for summer travel

Denver cracked the top 10 list of the summer travel destinations from the American Automobile Association (AAA). At number 10, the city was just after San Francisco and Maui. Orlando and Seattle were respectively first and second.

Excerpt:

The great American road trip is back and AAA summer travel bookings indicate Denver is one of the top ten travel destinations. Nearly 56 percent of Americans are planning a drive vacation this summer, prompted by low gas prices according to a recent AAA survey. The lowest summertime gas prices in 11 years are prompting Americans to drive in record numbers.

Read the rest here.
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