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People profiles Feral founder

Jimmy Funkhouser of Denver's Feral Mountain Company was the subject of an "American Doers" video and profile in People magazine.

Excerpt:

It wasn't easy for 34-year-old Jimmy Funkhouser to leave his small hometown of Elberfeld, Indiana, and it was even harder to leave his nine younger siblings.

"It was hard. As the oldest, I’ve always had this sense of wanting to set an example," Funkhouser tells PEOPLE. "I think being the oldest naturally instills within you this nature of blazing a path."

This year, Funkhouser quit his 10-year corporate job, moved to Denver, Colorado and started on his mission for achieving his own American Dream -- opening a mountain gear shop.

Read the rest here.

High Times picks its favorite munchies in Denver

The cannabis-friendly magazine chose 10 of its favorite post-smoke eateries in the city.

Excerpt:

Since legalization of cannabis in Denver, Colorado, the urban landscape has experienced a surge of marijuana enthusiasts and medical refugees alike looking to make a home in the Mile High City. Abandoned properties once stuck motionless in a state of decay have been revived by grow operations and newly legal businesses. What was once derelict has been brought back to life, breathing energy into the city streets.
 
Taking part in a cultural revolution can cause one to work up an appetite, so as one of those marijuana enthusiasts new to Denver, you might be asking yourself, "Where are the best places to eat while stoned?"

Well, we're here to help you find the best munchie fixes in the city with expert recommendations from a top cannabis chef, complete with pairing tips for primo pot strains  -- so get ready to blaze before stepping foot into one of these fine establishments!

Read the rest here.

Soulciti covers Denver-based Ed Dwight's black history memorial in Austin

The sculptor's massive monument is being installed on the grounds of the Texas State Capitol.

Excerpt:

By all accounts, the 32-foot-long and 27-foot-high monument -- crafted by master sculptor Ed Dwight of Denver, CO -- is both massive and magnificent. From a north-facing distance, its high point parallels the Capitol's peak, and it sits across from a statue that honors Confederate states and the dates that they seceded from the Union during the Civil War.

"What I did is, I told the whole story of Texas from the beginning with all the visual details of it. I matched the stories with the visuals. And the story is all laid out for you," says Dwight, who has created statues and memorials around the U.S. and in Canada. "We've got an African American explorer exploring Texas in the 1500s, and we've got a Black astronaut from Texas exploring space. And all my stories have happy endings."

Read the rest here.

Travelocity names Denver second-best beer destination

Portland topped the list; Denver was ahead of no. 3 Seattle.

Excerpt:

Last year, in a Travelocity survey of 1,003 people, more than three-quarters of those surveyed said they would like to go on a trip where they visited craft breweries and sampled local beer. Recognizing this interest in beer tourism, Travelocity enlisted the expertise of the Brewers Association, a national trade association dedicated to promoting American craft brewers, their beers and the community of brewing enthusiasts, to find America’s best beer destinations by creating the first Beer Tourism Index.



Read the rest here.

WSJ dives into Denver Water reservoir project

The proposed expansion of Gross Reservoir near Boulder was the topic of The Wall Street Journal's story.

Excerpt:

Next year, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers is expected to decide whether to issue a permit to triple the capacity of Gross Reservoir in the Rocky Mountain foothills, with additional shipments of about 18,000 acre feet of water a year from the Colorado River watershed. An acre foot is enough water to meet the annual needs of an average family of five.
 
That is one of the last regulatory barriers for utility Denver Water's $380 million project, for which district officials say they hope to break ground in 2019 to help ensure local water supplies.

"We have an obligation to supply water," said Jeff Martin, Denver Water's manager of the project, as he stood recently atop a 340-foot concrete dam that is to be raised by 131 feet under the plan. "It's not an option to not have water."

Read the rest here.

NY Times looks at expansion plans of Denver-based Dixie Brands

With marijuana legalized in numerous states, Dixie Brands is eyeing a tricky strategy to grow in new markets, reports The New York Times.

Excerpt:

Almost all small-business owners dream of the day when they can expand nationally. This has proved to be a unique challenge for those in the marijuana industry because the products they create are illegal under federal law, and the checkerboard of states that permit marijuana sales have complex and constantly changing regulations.

Dixie Brands, a company in Denver that creates drinks and other products using marijuana, is aiming to navigate those hurdles and become one of the first companies in the industry to build a national presence.

Voters on Tuesday brought that dream a little closer to reality. California, Massachusetts, Maine and Nevada approved adult-use (a new term for recreational use) marijuana. Florida, Arkansas, North Dakota and Montana voted to legalize or expand medical marijuana use. Twenty-eight states and the District of Columbia now have some sort of allowed use.

Read the rest here.

Columbia Journalism Review talks to Denverite editor

Corey Hutchins of the Columbia Journalism Review interviewed Dave Burdick of Denverite for a podcast.

Excerpt:

About five months ago, a for-profit, hyperlocal online news site called Denverite launched in Colorado's capital with the feel of a national startup. Backed by a trio of investors in Business Insider, the news outlet is the pilot project for a potential string of sites in other cities.

Denverite does not yet have a business model, but will start experimenting with how to make the site profitable. On Election Day, for instance, the outlet will host a ticketed event at its downtown office. In the meantime, the news organization's team of about 10 journalists have been cranking out the news about Denver and its metro area of nearly 3 million people.

So what has the journey been like so far? Last month I sat down with site editor Dave Burdick, who left his job as deputy features editor of The Denver Post to run the new startup. We talked about the challenges of launching a hyperlocal, digital-only news product, how he's building new audiences, and what a potential revenue stream might one day look like. The man has a passion for local news.



Read and listen here.

LA Times covers the return of the Ski Train

A story in the Los Angeles Times mapped out the new train-to-train route from Denver International Airport to the slopes at Winter Park.

Excerpt:

After a seven-year hiatus, Colorado’s ski train, which ran from Denver to the Winter Park ski resort from 1940 to 2009, is back. 

The train, a longtime tradition in the Centennial State, will begin making runs beginning Jan. 7 and will continue every weekend and holiday through March 26.

Thanks to a new commuter line running from Denver International Airport (DEN) to Union Station in downtown Denver, from which the Winter Park Express departs, visiting skiers and snowboarders can get to Winter Park Resort without renting or even getting into a car during their stay.

Read the rest here.

Wired flies with Denver aerial photographer Evan Anderman

A slideshow of shots by the Denver-based photographer showcase little-seen Colorado landscapes on the plains, and in the foothills and suburbia.

Excerpt:

Think of Colorado, and you probably picture the snow-capped peaks of the Rockies. But nearly half of the state lies on the high plains to the east of the mountains. The terrain is no less scenic, especially when seen from above.

"I love looking at the landscape and understanding how everything fits together," says Evan Anderman, who spends hours taking aerial photos from the cockpit of his plane, 1,500 feet above the plains.

His gorgeous images, taken during some 200 flights, capture the breadth of the plains and its industry. Fields of wheat, millet, and hay wave in the breeze. Cattle graze on rangeland. Factories, mines, and oil rigs dot the land. "Every square inch out there has been affected [by industry] in one way or another," Anderman says.

Read the rest and see the slideshow here.

Men's Journal details "World's Best Brewery Crawl" in Denver

The route includes pints at Wynkoop, Great Divide and Spangalang.

Excerpt:

If you're a true fan of better beer, upgrade the suds-soaked adventure that is the bar crawl to a brewery crawl. At every stop you'll get to meet the men and women behind the pint in your hand, and those ales and lagers will never be fresher than when they're served a few feet from where they're brewed. Sadly, not many cities have the proper density of breweries to pull off a proper crawl, but among the lucky few, Denver reigns supreme.

In this three-mile stretch across downtown Denver, there are an astounding 18 breweries (including a cidery). Naturally, we don't recommend hitting every spot in one day. But with a little prudent sampling, you can hit the high notes in one long-distance stroll. Each leg of our crawl takes about a 15-minute walk to the next watering hole, though Uber is abundant across the city.

Read the rest here.

Curbed names Wynkoop one of "10 streets that define America"

Wynkoop Street in LoDo has undergone a remarkable renaissance in the last 25 years.

Excerpt:

Jim Graeber notes that when he moved in two years later into his own loft down the street, "Union Station was a beautiful building, but it wasn't used much. Two Amtrak trains a day and the ski train, but that was it."

Loft conversions in the early 1990s spurred further development downtown. Joyce Meskis, owner of the independent bookstore the Tattered Cover, had dreamed of expanding her Cherry Creek-based operation with a satellite store, but couldn't afford the expensive real estate on the eastern side of town.

Wynkoop Street was less expensive, and offered her, she says, "the chance to be a part of the future of Denver." But even though the neighborhood showed promise, "in the early stage when we moved there [they first opened a warehouse in 1990 and then a store in 1994], there were more pigeon occupants than people occupants."

Read the rest here.

NY Times spotlights immigrant bus in Denver

New York Times story offered a personal look at Autobuses los Paisanos in downtown Denver, where buses ferry a largely immigrant clientele to El Paso and back.

Excerpt:

The $65 bus to Mexico rolled into a parking lot here recently, belching exhaust into the Colorado night as a river of people -- crying, kissing -- thrust belongings into the belly of the vehicle and climbed aboard.

Frank Torres, 64, a driver in black slacks, descended from his perch above it all.

"This is true drama," he said, surveying the scene. A boy wailed to his left. Travelers burdened by packages passed on his right. Mr. Torres, snacking on a coconut Popsicle, took a meaty bite. "Separation. You see a lot of that. The mother leaving her child. The child leaving the mother. This is how it goes."

Read the rest here.

CBC contrasts Calgary and Denver

CBC Calgary took a hard look at the story behind Denver's resiliency during the recent energy bust.

Excerpt:

Denver and Calgary have a lot in common. But while Denver is rising, Calgary is struggling.

Founded within 20 years of each other, both cities were 19th century western frontiers. Places built on railways, agriculture and oil. For decades, both cities followed a similar economic path -- including the highs and lows of the energy industry.

But then, just a little more than 30 years ago, both cities faced a crisis. Calgary went one way, and is still riding the energy wave. Denver another, leading to a thriving economy. 

Calgary could stand to learn a thing or two from Denver. Something that occurred to Calgary Economic Development, which recently sent someone down on a fact-finding mission to study the successes of the Mile High City -- named for the exact mile it sits above sea level.

Read the rest here.

PRI covers first Indigenous People's Day in Denver

PRI's The World reported the story of Indigenous People's Day in Denver.

Excerpt:

The new holiday in Denver is mostly symbolic. Most residents still have to go to work. Still, Maymangwa says the city’s decision shows attitudes are changing.

“History from his perspective is told by victor, and in our case the conqueror," she said. "Colonial perspectives of our history do not work for us. They’re wrong.”



Read the rest here.

Bloomberg tastes "Denver's booming food scene"

A recent story highlighted restaurants in Union Station, Cart-Driver, Hop Alley, and other foodie hotspots in the city.

Excerpt:

I wouldn't want to waste anyone's time when they have important matters to attend to on the snow-covered Colorado slopes this ski season. But the Denver dining scene has gotten incredibly exciting. In fact, it's become a dining destination whether or not it's simply a stop en route to the mountains.

Sometimes it's hard to pinpoint why a city's food scene improves. It could be proximity to a more expensive city that cooks can't afford to live in, or a break-out chef that brings attention to his or her neighbors. In Denver, it's the story of a transportation hub.
 
The grand Union Station, which re-opened in 2014 after a $54 million renovation, is both a conduit from the country's largest airport (37 minutes by train) to a handful of ski areas, as well as the site of the lovely Crawford Hotel. It's also a major driver of the city's restaurant boom.

Read the rest here.
653 Articles | Page: | Show All
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