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Transportation Transformation Project credits Mile High Connects

MZ Strategies' Transportation Transformation Project gave credit to coalitions like Denver's Mile High Connects.

Excerpt:

Use and Maintain Cross-Sector Coalitions.
Among the questions this project sought to answer was the level and type of coordination needed between local and national advocates to influence local and regional transformation, while also catalyzing larger state and federal policy change and market
transformation. Cross-sector coalitions have emerged as a highly effective means of coordination both for groups within a region and also to engage national advocates either directly as coalition partners, or to help coordinate, provide technical assistance and strategic direction to these types of collaboratives. The Great Communities Collaborative in the Bay Area, the Central Corridor Funders Collaborative, and Mile High Connects in Denver all illustrate this type of approach.

Read the rest here.

On the Commons highlights creative placemaking in Denver

New Freedom Park in east Denver is a prototype for creative placemakers, says On the Commons.

Excerpt:

Denver's New Freedom Park--Refugees from Afghanistan, Myanmar, Somalia, Burundi and Nepal living on the East Side of Denver were seeking a place where they could grow food, celebrate their culture and where their kids could safely play. The Trust for Public Land teamed up with the Colorado Health Foundation and Denver Park & Recreation to transform a 2-acre vacant lot strewn with broken glass into New Freedom Park, which now features 50 family garden plots, a playground, a soccer field and a community gathering spot in the shade of cottonwood trees.

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Mad Genius Radio boss makes music predictions at Hypebot.com

Eric Neumann, CEO of Denver-based Mad Genius Radio, unpacked his music predictions for 2015 at Hypebot.com.

Excerpt:

1. The RESPECT Act will be reintroduced in Congress early 2015
Currently, pre-1972 audio recordings are not covered under federal copyright law and, therefore, are not subject to receiving royalty payments. The RESPECT Act would mend this issue and enable all digital performances of songs -- regardless of the year they were recorded -- to become eligible for royalties. While Sirius and Pandora have both opposed the RESPECT Act, I wonder what Diana Ross, Robert Plant and Paul McCartney think about receiving compensation they’ve been due for quite some time.

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Reason Foundation offers $52 billion plan to reduce traffic congestion in Denver

The Libertarian-leaning Reason Foundation devised a $52 billion plan to reduce traffic congestion in Denver.

Excerpt:

Our plan for the state and regional highway totals $22 billion. Assuming the Denver Regional Council of Governments (DRCOG) chooses to spend an additional $15 billion on local roads and an additional $15 billion to provide transit services, the 30-year total would be $52 billion. This $52 billion plan spends only 39% of the $133 billion in the DRCOG 2012 long-range plan and covers a longer time period of 30 years (from 2015–2044) compared to 24 years (2012–2035) for the DRCOG plan. More importantly, our plan has a realistic funding and financing source, filling a $6 billion hole with the transition to a mileage-based user fee, while the current DRCOG plan has a $40 billion hole that the entity has no realistic way of funding. Unlike the DRCOG's 2035 plan that hopes to spend $133 billion and still results in worse congestion, our plan significantly reduces congestion and saves money.

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Grape Collective references Infinite Monkey Theorem in ode to urban winery

Grape Collective referenced RiNo's Infinite Monkey Theorem in a story on why urban wineries matter.

Excerpt:

At The Infinite Monkey Theorem in Denver, Colorado, however, the winemakers have done away with perfectly-placed vineyards, scenic landscapes, and lavish tasting rooms in favor of a focus on pure quality and flavor. Instead of being strictly an expression of place, it is wineries like these that are taking the traditional oenological trope one step further, making wine that is as much an expression of culture and community as it is topophilia.

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Sustainable City Network reports on greening of Denver

Sustainable City Network covered sustainability initiatives by the City and County of Denver.

Excerpt:

While Colorado's epic floods of September 2013 made national news, it has been a water disaster of another kind that worries Denver's Chief Sustainability Officer Jerry Tinianow the most.

"Really it's the lack of precipitation," he said. "Drought is a much bigger threat here."

In June, Denver published its first Climate Adaptation Plan, intended to help the city and county prepare, mitigate and plan for risks associated with an increase in temperature and urban heat island effect, an increase in frequency of extreme weather events, and a reduced snowpack and earlier snowmelt, among other potential consequences of climate change. A hotter, dryer climate does not bode well for area ski resorts, which represent an important segment of the region's economy.

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WSJ spotlights rising rents in Denver

The Wall Street Journal reported on Denver's escalating rental market.

Excerpt:

Apartment dwellers in New York, San Francisco and Boston often pay more in rent than average Americans spend on monthly home-mortgage payments.

Is it time to add Denver to that list?

Read the rest here.

Wonderbound video dances through 2014

Wonderbound offered a visual look back at 2014 for the contemporary dance company.

Watch here:


Permalink here.


Des Moines Register covers making of domino card for Denver law firm

The Des Moines Register covered the making of a holiday video card made by toppling a Denver replica made with 6,000 dominoes for Otten Johnson Robinson Neff + Ragonetti.



Here's the final video.

Permalink here.

NPR reports on Denver culinary ascension

National Public Radio covered Denver's rising dining star.

Excerpt:

When you think of the restaurant scene, Denver probably doesn't come to mind. But that's just the latest change for a city whose population has ballooned in the last couple of years, thanks in part to a nearby oil and gas boom. Top chefs are beginning to take notice.

Award-winning pastry chef Keegan Gerhard, for example, just opened a new location of his restaurant, D Bar, that is three times the size of his old one. His chef buddies wonder why he's in Denver.

"Listen, everybody in my industry, certainly all of my [Food Network] TV colleagues [say]: 'Like, really Keegan? Really? Denver? What, are you afraid to compete? What, is your food not good?' Like, I've heard it all," Gerhard says.

Read the rest here.
 

Denver agent pushes for Amazon-ification of real estate at Inman

Greg Eckler of Denver Realty Experts wrote a column about applying Amazon's "everything store" model to residential real estate for Inman News.

Excerpt:

Based on this scenario, we see small local bookstores (and large chain bookstores, eventually) going out of business. I expect this to happen in real estate, too.

When this shift happens to real estate, low-producing agents will be the first to go. These are agents who are trying to make a living but just aren't successful in today's market. If commissions were to drop, they wouldn't be able to hold on; they would need to merge into a new business model or leave the business.

Read the rest here.

Zagat pegs Troy Guard as one of "America's Next Restaurant Moguls"

Zagat named Troy Guard of TAG/Bubu/Los Chingones fame one of America's next restaurant moguls.

Excerpt:

Born in Hawaii, and a kitchen disciple of Roy Yamaguchi, Troy Guard's culinary career has taken him all over the world, including San Diego, Hong Kong, New York and, eventually, Denver, where he now presides over seven restaurants (an eighth is on the horizon). The trailblazing chef and restaurateur shows no signs of slowing down, having opened two back-to-back restaurants in 2014 alone.

Read the rest here.

USA Today profiles Denver startup behind beer concentrate

Sustainable Beverage Technologies will debut its BrewVo technology in early 2015, reported USA Today.

Excerpt:

As the craft brewing industry grows and competition increases, a Denver start-up is betting brewers will want technology that cuts costs and makes their operations more efficient.

Early in 2015, Sustainable Beverage Technologies will introduce BrewVo, a patented process for brewing beer into a liquid concentrate and then mixing it with water using the same dispensing equipment that restaurants use for soft drinks. The process eliminates the need for 15.5-gallon beer kegs and the water used to clean and sanitize them. Potential customers could include breweries, bars and restaurants.

Founder Patrick Tatera says investors are backing the business and he's got partnerships in place with brewers, both "flagship" and craft, that he says have asked not to be named for now. Tatera's technology is considered risky and radical for the brewing industry. Those who have pursued similar innovations before him have seen a backlash from regulators, health experts and the spirits industry.

Read the rest here.

Entrepreneur covers Denver-based Evolve Vacation Rental Network in story on sharing economy services

Entrepreneur talked to Brian Egan at Denver-based Evolve Vacation Rental Network for a story about services for the sharing economy.

Excerpt:

"The best marketplace is only as good as its suppliers," says Evolve co-founder Brian Egan of his company’s position in the sharing-economy ecosystem. "Marketplaces in our space are established; now we just need more suppliers to fill them out."

Read the rest here.

Lexology lists new year's resolutions for Denver real estate

Lexology published new year's resolutions for Denver real estate from Heather Park of Otten Johnson Robinson Neff + Ragonetti.

Excerpt:

Here are some things to watch:
  •  Despite the demand for owner-occupied, multi-family housing, condominium development in Colorado has been at a near standstill. This is largely due to fear of litigation under Colorado's existing construction defect law.  In 2015, a legislative bill will likely be introduced again to address the existing problems. Reform may encourage new condominium development in Colorado.
Read the rest here.
653 Articles | Page: | Show All
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