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AP story delves into the history and present of Five Points, Denver's "Harlem of the West"

The Associated Press story looked at the rich legacy of jazz, African-American history and the neighborhood's modern-day boom.

Excerpt:
 
Denver's Five Points isn't the only historically black enclave changed by population shifts and revitalization. In New York, neighborhoods like Harlem and Brooklyn's Fort Greene have lost black residents as rents have risen. Seminal black-owned landmarks, like Harlem's Lenox Lounge, have shuttered. Activists in Houston's Freeman's Town have worked to prevent brick streets laid by former slaves from being uprooted despite development pressures.

On the other hand, some of Five Points' new businesses are opening in storefronts that have long sat empty, and they're making an effort to recognize the neighborhood's roots.

The 715 Club, founded by the son of a Pullman porter at the corner of Welton and 26th, had been closed for years before a 2016 reopening. "We are a neighborhood bar in the heart of 5 Points trying to preserve a piece of Welton history," the new owners say on their Facebook page.

Read the rest here.

NY Times covers I-70 expansion controversy

The story delved into the environmental and health hazards associated with the project.

Excerpt:

Each morning Yadira Sanchez and her three children awaken to the roar of traffic and the plumes of exhaust that spill from the highway that cuts through their neighborhood.

Now, Ms. Sanchez and her family are confronting a plan to triple the width of this state's main east-west artery, sending tens of thousands more cars by their door.

Denver was the fastest-growing large city in America in 2015, with a population of nearly 700,000, and the scene of a tech and marijuana boom that has drawn 1,000 new households a month. But as in other cities, its highways have not kept up with development. Many roads are crumbling, leaving officials with decisions that will have lasting effects on the families living nearby, including residents of Elyria-Swansea, a low-income and overwhelmingly Latino community still reeling from the road's construction back in 1964.

Read the rest here.

CBRE Research tabs Denver as world's second hottest market for retail rents

Only San Francisco topped Denver, where retail rents are forecast to rise by 7 percent in 2017.

Excerpt:


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Cooking Channel chows at Biker Jim's

The segment sampled some of the more exotic hot dogs at Denver's one and only Biker Jim's.

Excerpt:

"Biker Jim's is a place in a class of its own," says restaurateur Bradley Rubin. "What this guy's doing with sausages, nobody else is doing, I'm telling you. Nobody's coming close."

Watch it here.

U.S. News & World Report pegs Denver second-best city to live

After topping the list in 2016, Denver was second to only Austin in 2017.

Excerpt:

To clarify a common misconception, Denver is not a mountain town. It actually takes at least an hour to drive to the Rockies. But there are some great places for recreating within a 30-minute drive of downtown, such as Red Rocks Park and Cherry Creek State Park.  

Some might say that Denver is experiencing a gold rush of a different color: green. After Colorado residents voted to legalize recreational marijuana in 2012, Denver has seen a surge in cannabis-related commerce, from dispensaries to magazines to high-tech paraphernalia like vaporizers, rolling papers, lotions and storage containers -- and the industry is just gaining speed. 

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NY Times spotlights Ryan McGinley show at MCA Denver

The show opens Feb. 11 at Museum of Contemporary Art Denver.

Excerpt:

In 1999, the photographer Ryan McGinley self-published "The Kids Are Alright," a book capturing his crew of downtown friends and lovers in varying states of nudity, ecstasy and reckless abandon. He shot prolifically, using up to 20 rolls of film a night. "At the time, it was really important to document my life because I was the only one out of my friends who was doing it," he says now. He sent copies of the handmade book to a few gallerists, curators and photographers he admired. Among them was Sylvia Wolf, then the head of the Department of Photography at the Whitney Museum, who helped arrange McGinley's breakout solo exhibition there in 2003. He was 26  -- one of the youngest artists ever to have a solo show at the museum.

But now, it all feels like ancient history. For "Ryan McGinley: The Kids Were Alright," a new show that opens at the Museum of Contemporary Art Denver this month, McGinley returned to the period between 1998 and 2003 -- unearthing some 1,500 Polaroids that have never been exhibited before. In revisiting these unfiltered images of his hedonistic past (self-portraits of him having sex, or friends masturbating and doing drugs) McGinley describes a kind of emotional release. "It wasn't painful, but in a way it was cathartic to have almost 20 years' distance on my photos and go through my archive and see how I grew up." He continues: "I'm very in touch with my vulnerability and I'm proud of those photos where it's really raw. It really was my life at the time."

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LinkedIn ranks Denver fourth in U.S. for worker migration

The LinkedIn Workforce Report ranked Denver after Seattle, Portland and Austin.

Excerpt:

Seattle, Portland, Austin, Denver, and Charlotte gained the most workers over the last 12 months. For every 10,000 LinkedIn members in Seattle, 68.2 workers moved to the city in the last year  -- mostly from San Francisco, Chicago, New York City, and Los Angeles.

Seattle, Portland, Austin, Denver, and Charlotte are all cities that have a lower cost of living than cities like New York and San Francisco, and have access to the great outdoors. This is a trend we’re keeping an eye on. 

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ARTnews covers MCA Denver grant

The $400,000 grant from the Mellon Foundation will fund "Animating Museums" workshops.

Excerpt:

The Museum of Contemporary Art Denver announced yesterday that it has received a $400,000 grant from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation. The grant will go toward a three-year program, “Animating Museums,” for which professionals from around the world will be brought to Denver to host a series of workshops.

"Animating Museums" will start this summer with a ten-day residency. The next year, the fellows will participate in a series of webinars related to their fields, and the year after that, they will realize a major project, which the museum said will likely be "a large scale festival or similar activation." Applications to become a participant in the program are currently available at a site launched by the MCA.

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NY Times gauges $1.9M worth of housing in Denver

The story compared properties in Denver, Santa Barbara, California, and Wayne, Pennsylvania. 

Excerpt:

DENVER

WHAT A condominium with three bedrooms and five bathrooms in a converted church

HOW MUCH $1,850,000

SIZE 4,815 square feet

PRICE PER SQUARE FOOT $384

SETTING This condominium is in a former Presbyterian church in the San Rafael historic district, about 10 blocks outside downtown Denver. With the exception of some commercial and small apartment buildings, the neighborhood is single-family, dominated by red brick houses, many of them Queen Anne-style. Shopping and dining are a few blocks away, toward downtown.

INDOORS The church was built in 1906 and converted to a residence between 2012 and 2014. It was designed by A. Morris Stuckert, an architect who built several houses in the district, though is probably best known for the Kittredge building, an imposing granite office downtown.

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ABC News visits elephants at Denver Zoo

The segment looked at research that showed older male elephants teaching younger ones, and how it plays out with new living arrangements at the Denver Zoo.

Video:



Watch it here.

Curbed probes lower rents in Denver

The prime reason for the drop: lots of new apartments.

Excerpt:

According to the new Denver Metro Area Apartment Vacancy and Rent Survey, published by the Apartment Association of Metro Denver, the city's average apartment rent fell from $1,371 in the third quarter to $1,347 in the fourth quarter. It was the largest quarterly drop in the 36 years that the study has been conducted.

In addition, vacancy rates -- which show the number of available apartments and can help illustrate affordability -- increased from 5.1 percent to 6.2 percent, which is a more "healthy" percentage.
 
How did Denver do it? A total of 9,962 new apartment units were built in the city during 2016, a record-breaking number.
"In 2010, only 498 new apartment units were built in the entire city. Fast forward to 2016 and we're seeing that same number being delivered every three weeks in Denver," said Teo Nicolais, a real estate expert and Harvard University professor quoted in the study. "That's the most apartments we've built during one year in Denver's entire history."

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NY Times ponders "Peak Millennial" in Denver and other cities

The story wondered how much longer cities should focus on recruiting the generation.

Excerpt:

The flow of young professionals into Philadelphia has flattened, according to JLL Research, while apartment rents have started to soften in a number of big cities because of a glut of new construction geared toward urban newcomers who haven't arrived. Apartment rents in San Francisco, Washington, Denver, Miami and New York are moderating or even declining from a year ago, according to Zillow.

"Certainly the softening of rents is one sign that they are not coming in at the pace that people thought they would," said Diane Swonk, an independent economist in Chicago.

The debate is full of contours and caveats, but it really boils down to this: Are large numbers of millennials really so enamored with city living that they will age and raise families inside the urban core, or will many of them, like earlier generations, eventually head to the suburbs in search of bigger homes and better school districts?

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Adelaide looks to Denver for lessons

An InDaily story looked at what economic lessons the capital of South Australia could learn from Colorado's capital city.

Excerpt:

In 2015, Denver was named as [most] liveable city in the west and the fourth-best metro area for science, technology, engineering and mathematics professionals in America. More than 38 per cent of Colorado's adult population has completed a bachelor's degree or higher. In 2015, Colorado was also ranked as the second-most entrepreneurial State in America.

Adelaide, like Denver, provides a very high quality of life, affordable housing, quality health care, a ready supply of commercial property for lease or purchase, friendly people, a well-educated work force, and many other attributes that mirror Denver's. Adelaide's countryside is very attractive, tourism is well targeted and events are significantly supported.

Adelaide Airport has improved quite dramatically since the 1990s. Adelaide Oval is a world class venue. So why hasn't Adelaide grown at anything like the very fast rate of Denver?

Read the rest here.

Mayor Hancock gives Denver travel tips to U.S. News & World Report

His picks included LoDo, the Denver Art Museum and Red Rocks.

Excerpt:

Denver Mayor Michael Hancock has been a key force behind efforts to ramp up tourism in the Mile High City since being elected in 2011, working to expand direct flights to Denver International Airport and improve the airport's facilities. A longtime Denver resident now in his second term, Hancock has seen firsthand how much the city has grown and changed over the years. He says Denver has a special quality that makes the city unique.

"There’s a certain spirit in this city you don’t find everywhere," he tells U.S. News. "It’s a very optimistic, forward-thinking, positive spirit that permeates every sector and every individual."

. . .

Describe your perfect day in Denver.

My family and I would go have brunch at Snooze or one of the great diners in Denver, like the Denver Diner downtown. Then we would go walk the dogs in City Park. Then maybe we’d go to the Denver Zoo, which is well-respected around the country. The primates and the elephants are my favorite animal exhibits. At night, we’d have dinner, then we would go find somewhere to enjoy live music because Denver has more live music venues than Austin, Texas. I love listening to jazz at El Chapultepec and Jazz at Jacks. The Soiled Dove Underground in [the neighborhood of] Lowry has great sound and gets some national acts.

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Government Technology looks at DPS Imaginarium

Government Technology magazine reported on Denver Public Schools' Imaginarium in a feature on innovation in education.

Excerpt:

At the other end of the spectrum is the imaginarium, an innovation lab launched last year by Denver Public Schools. Part of its reason for being is to counter traditional approaches to improving education, explained Peter Piccolo, director of innovation at the lab. "My colleagues are making sure the trains go down the tracks while I'm trying to build the rocketship," he said. 

There's also a big difference in the amount of money that governments are willing to spend. Gregory couldn't put a number on the cost of his program, but it probably amounts to little added expense. The cost of provisioning space on CalCloud is low. There is also the cost of the manpower of the developers. Currently, any other expenses are coming out of the state's enterprise IT fund, which already supports approved IT projects that are developed in the lab. But the program is brand new, and the state is still discussing how projects might be funded in the future, said Gregory.

The imaginarium, on the other hand, is a big investment. It has a staff of 20 and a budget this year of almost $6 million, with about $3.8 million coming from the school district and $2 million from philanthropies, according to Piccolo. 

Read the rest here.
653 Articles | Page: | Show All
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