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Indian Country Today spotlights Gregg Deal at DAM

Paiute performance artist Gregg Deal is shattering stereotypes at the Denver Art Museum, reported Indian Country Today Media Network.

Excerpt:

It's winter in Colorado. You walk into the residency space at the Denver Art Museum [DAM], and there stands artist Gregg Deal; he's tall with slicked-back hair pulled tightly into a ponytail. He's surrounded by his work, and also some props -- a feather headdress, a long breastplate, and shirt and pants with fringe.

Deal, who’s Pyramid Lake Paiute and a performance artist, said, as part of his art, he will don the faux Native American items in public to address the concept -- or misconception -- of Native Americans in the 21st century. Deal is the current Native Arts Artist-in-Residence at DAM.

Recently, for one of his performances, Deal sat within a barricade outside of the museum clad in his Native American clothing and face paint. He said he was approached by passersby who were visibly curious why there was an Indian just posted there. Some ignored him. Some sneered. Others attempted to engage him. But he said he would not respond. When he's in the attire he’s in character -- a figure in a living painting, if you will.

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Tomorrow Tour coming to Denver Feb. 3

Technical.ly's Tomorrow Tour is coming to The Commons on Champa on Feb. 3.

Excerpt:

On Feb. 3, [Erik] Mitisek will be leading an innovation case study at Tomorrow Tour Denver, a stop on a national event series inspired by Comcast NBCUniversal and organized by Technical.ly. The series aims to explore and document how technology and innovation converge to strengthen the city. A free evening roundtable and networking event will connect local entrepreneurs, technologists, policymakers and new thinkers for discussions about the future of innovation and entrepreneurship. A key focus will be how to better articulate Denver's innovation stories and improve the economy.

"Colorado is becoming the undisputed technology and innovation hub between the coasts," Mitisek said. "Tours like this help get our message out of the community and reinforce the depth of great companies, founders and leaders in Colorado. This event is unique as it provides a forum, across industries, for leaders to convene and discuss the important topics for us to continue to build a next-generation entrepreneurial community."

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Apartment List reports on what $1,500 gets you in Denver and other cities

Apartment List checked what $1,500 in rent equals for tenants in Denver and other cities across the country.

Excerpt:

We all know from hard life experience that paying rent is one of the most soul-crushing things about being an adult. No matter where you live, it will always be a bummer; but some locations are better at curbing the pain than others. Knowing this, we combed the Apartment List website across 12 U.S. cities to find apartments you can rent with a $1,500 budget. Where do renters get the most bang for their buck?
 
1. Denver – Tons of luxurious amenities to go along with this brand new apartment: 1-bedroom, 719 sq ft, $1,490 (Capitol Hill)

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WSJ spotlights Denver's Folsom Custom Skis

The Wall Street Journal profiled Folsom Custom Skis of Denver for a story on custom skis.

Excerpt:

Some small custom-ski makers also sell ready-made models as a way to boost business. Such is the approach of Folsom Custom Skis, which is based in Denver. "We have a huge range of customers, from the guy who has tried everything and wants a fully custom ski to the person who just wants personal artwork," said Ryan Prentice, the company's chief of sales.

For the skier who may not be ready to commit to a customized ski but prefers something one-of-a-kind, Folsom can tweak its ready-made models. "If people are looking for a cheaper build, we can help them select the right ski from our retail line…and then we finish it with a custom graphic of whatever they want," said Mr. Prentice.

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Weirdest Band in the World names Denver's itchy-O "Weird Band of the Week"

The Weirdest Band in the World website honored Denver's itchy-O Marching Band as its "Weird Band of the Week."

Excerpt:

A 30-plus-piece ensemble from Denver, the Itchy-O Marching Band (IOMB) typically begins their performance by entering the venue from the street. Drums dominate, but there are also synths, vocalists, dancers, guitar and bass, and a prominently featured Theremin. Many of the performers wear amps like backpacks, so they can move freely around the venue during the show. There's usually a giant, dancing Chinese dragon. There are several of those massive, Japanese taiko drums, which are basically the Steinway pianos of the drum world, both in terms of sound and in terms of how much it must suck to haul them around on tour. They wear black balaclavas and often giant sombreros, which makes them look a little like a gang of anarchist mariachis.

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Forbes calls Crawford one of "10 Best Hotels" of 2015

Forbes called Denver Union Station's Crawford Hotel one of the world's 10 top hosteries for 2015.

Excerpt:

The Crawford is simply the coolest new hotel I have visited in a long time. It is a great model for the boutique/hip hotel industry that opened last July and is the centerpiece of a total renovation of historic 120-year old Union Station in the heart of downtown. But is not just a hotel in a train station, it is a train station as hotel, a triumph of architecture and design. It uses the main waiting room of the grand building as its lobby, and in each arched entryway surrounding the hall, which once led to trains, there is a bar, restaurant, coffee shop, or retail store, which are also part of the public space. Guest rooms rise above both sides of the great hall, with its 65-foot atrium ceiling.

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Yahoo! Travel explores Denver

Yahoo! Travel experienced some of Denver's more unusual attractions.

Excerpt:

Instead of opting for a hotel in Denver, I chose an Airbnb that was actually more like a share house. Traveling solo, I wanted to make sure I'd be able to easily meet new people, and staying in the West Colfax neighborhood in this five-bedroom house meant that after a day's exploration I always had people to hang out with. This was hands-down my favorite Airbnb I've ever stayed in. It was also a two-block walk from the light rail, and a ten-minute train ride to downtown.

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The Atlantic posts mesmerizing satellite photo of Colorado

The Atlantic posted a mindblowing high-res satellite photo of Colorado -- you can zoom in on Denver, the Black Canyon of the Gunnison or just about anyplace in between.

Excerpt:

On September 10, 2015, a satellite named WorldView-3 was whisking on its regular path from pole to pole, locked in orbit 400 miles above the eastern Pacific Ocean.

WorldView-3 is one of the most advanced privately owned Earth-observing satellites in use. It’s owned and operated by DigitalGlobe, a corporation that supplies imagery to the U.S. National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency and Google Maps. If you’ve seen an orbital view of the planet that showed streets and buildings, it’s likely you were looking at an image captured by WorldView-3 or another DigitalGlobe satellite.

On that late summer day, though, WorldView-3 followed an unusual path. In the late morning, as it passed over the Pacific, it turned back and looked at the continent to the east. Gazing over Los Angeles; the Mojave desert; the Grand Canyon; and the southern tip of Utah, it captured an image of Colorado.

See and read the rest here.

PeopleForBikes names Arapahoe Street one of 10 best new bike lanes

Bicycling advocacy group PeopleForBikes pegged the protected lane on Arapahoe Street downtown as one of "America's 10 best new bike lanes for 2015."

Excerpt:

If only these plastic posts could talk. This one-mile project was languishing as a line on a map until the Downtown Denver Partnership business advocacy group, inspired by a trip to Copenhagen and a wave of demand for better biking among downtown tech firms, rallied public support by creating a one-day demo and leading a successful crowfunding campaign that kicked off with an anchor donation from oil company Anadarko, among others.

The $36,000 raised through Ioby.org convinced Denver leaders that the public had their back. With their green light, city staff threw themselves into Arapahoe and its couplet street with a passion, rethought their bidding process and cut the ribbon this month, less than a year after approval. Like Queens Boulevard, it's a national model for quick-build street projects.

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Stapleton tower focus of CBS News report

A recent CBS News story focused on Punch Bowl Social's reuse of the old control tower at Stapleton.

Excerpt:

Every state in the U.S. has at least one abandoned airport, but now their runways, terminals and control towers are becoming a new destination for innovation.

Robert Thompson, a businessman, is one such innovator. Thompson told CBS News' Mark Albert that he is turning an airport in Denver that was once called the "Union Station of the air" into a different kind of center of action.

In its heyday, the Stapleton International Airport, named after a former Denver mayor, was the site of passenger flights that landed and took to the air from its three runways. It was even visited by the famed Amelia Earhart.

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LA Times stops in at Union Station

The Los Angeles Times took a train to Denver for a night at The Crawford Hotel at Union Station.

Excerpt:

The hotel has 112 guest rooms, all different in configuration or décor. We had booked a Pullman-style guest room, an appropriate transition from our Amtrak sleeper because the Pullman Co. was once the preeminent operator of sleeping cars. Other options include Loft, funky, creative suites in what had been an unused attic, and Classic, high-ceilinged rooms with expansive windows and Victorian furnishings in what once were offices.

Appropriately, the Pullman rooms overlook the tracks. Built in previously empty mezzanine space, they feature wood accents recalling old-fashioned Pullman cars and framed memorabilia. Some rooms have queen beds tucked into nooks, reminiscent of berths on the old trains.

So many places to eat and drink and so little time. We had a cocktail in the stylish Cooper Lounge, on a balcony overlooking the Great Hall. At the next table was Dana Crawford, the doyenne of historic preservation in downtown Denver who lent her name to the hotel.

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WSJ looks at Chipotle in feature on "seismic shift" in fast food

The Wall Street Journal shined a light on Chipotle Mexican Grill in a feature story on the ongoing "seismic shift" in fast food.

Excerpt:

Chipotle's founder and co-CEO, Steve Ells, didn't set out to start a fast-food revolution. After graduating from the Culinary Institute of America and cooking under Jeremiah Tower at the landmark San Francisco restaurant Stars, Ells moved home to Denver, where he opened the original Chipotle in 1993. Ells planned to finance a fine-dining restaurant by selling fast food, but when burrito sales took off, he created a modern paradigm where fine-dining chefs make the leap to fast food. José Andrés -- the celebrity chef who launched 3 locations of his own fast-casual concept, Beefsteak, in the past year -- compares Ells to Henry Ford. "Anything we say now, so early, about what Steve Ells has done won't be enough," Andrés says. "The production line he's created has changed the American food business."

Andrés is referring to a kind of transparency that the biggest chains -- once seen as innovators for their assembly-line approach to cooking -- now completely lack. There are more than 60 ingredients in a McDonald's Big Mac, including chemical compounds that, according to the company's ingredient statement, “protect flavor” in the sauce and facilitate “slice separation” in the cheese. Chipotle's entire menu has roughly 60 ingredients, including juniper berries, Hass avocado and organic herbs. "We use things like cutting boards, knives, sauté pans and saucepans," says Ells. "If you went to a typical fast-food restaurant with a bag of groceries you wanted to turn into a meal, it would be very difficult. They're very specific in how they rethermalize their highly processed product."

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Make magazine spotlights AKER

Make reported on Denver's AKER and its DIY kits for urban farming and beekeeping.

Excerpt:

AKER has designed a range of products to help people transform their yards, rooftops, balconies, and community gardens into areas for productive small-scale agriculture. The kits’ parts are CNC routed from high-quality, responsibly sourced plywood and take under an hour to assemble. If you live near a makerspace or fab lab with a CNC you can download the source files and make your own!

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Denver's DispatchHeath one of 10 health-tech startups to watch in 2016

Becker's Hospital Review pegged Denver-based DispatchHeath as one of its "startups to know for 2016." 

Excerpt:

DispatchHealth (Denver). There are a number of startups vying for the much-buzzed "Uber for healthcare" title. DispatchHealth may be one to claim the name. DispatchHealth offers mobile, onsite treatment for simple and complex patients needs. Using its app, customers can summon a clinician to come administer care wherever they may be. The company boasts longer, cheaper visits with providers and shorter wait times than traditional visits. 

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Inc. profiles Tender Belly

Inc. shined a spotlight on Denver craft bacon makers, Tender Belly.

Excerpt:

Erik worked his connections in the culinary community to get Tender Belly products into some of the hottest restaurants in the West. Chefs like Paul Qui at Qui, in Austin, and Alex Seidel at Mercantile Dining & Provisions, in Denver, began featuring the Duffys' pork products in their dishes and putting the trademarked Tender Belly name on their menus. "That's been a huge, huge thing," Shannon says of the chef endorsements. "People saw us, we had some local press right away, and people started asking, 'Where can we get it?'" Today, sales to restaurants bring in 80 percent of revenue; grocery stores contribute 15 percent, and direct sales via the website make up the remaining 5 percent.

Read the rest here.
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