| Follow Us:

Buzz

653 Articles | Page: | Show All

Society of Commercial Archaeology highlights endangered Colfax neon

The Society of Commercial Archaeology placed Colfax Avenue's neon signs on its 2016 "Falling by the Wayside" list of endangered landmarks.

Excerpt:

The neon signs on Colfax Avenue face several threats. First, as the Colfax Avenue corridor reawakens, there is pressure for redevelopment of the corridor. Abandoned properties along the corridor are often razed, along with their neon signs. Second, the high-quality materials that were used to make the signs originally make them expensive to maintain today, and it is often cheaper to replace the signs rather than repair them. Lastly, as new businesses open in existing buildings, many signs are demolished for signs for the new business. The threats to the signs on Colfax Avenue led Colorado Preservation, Inc., to place the signs in their 2014 Most Endangered Places Program.

Read the rest here.

Metro State partnering with Detroit music school

The Detroit Free Press reported that Metropolitan State University of Denver is opening a campus at  the Detroit Institute of Music Education (DIME).

Excerpt:

MSU Denver administrators visited DIME last year for the first time, "and it was love at first sight," said Kreidler, who said he was particularly impressed by the faculty: "highly credentialed, extremely intelligent and good at what they do."

The new deal is part of a bigger growth strategy for Nixon and Clayman: A Denver campus is expected to open in fall 2017, next in what they hope will be several DIME-branded schools across the country. And there are plans to double the space at the Detroit facility, which now occupies three floors of a Dan Gilbert-owned building.

"It's our dream to have this place full and buzzing with young students," said Clayman.

Read the rest here.

Four Denver restaurants make OpenTable's "100 Hottest Restaurants" list

Four Denver restaurants -- Acorn, Izakaya Den, Ophelia's Electric Soapbox and Linger -- made the cut for OpenTable's "100 Hottest Restaurants in America 2016" list.

Excerpt:

When looking for a place to dine out, why not snag a spot at the hottest place in town? The #OpenTable100 Hottest Restaurant in America list highlights hip, new restaurants, hot spots, celebrity chefs and avant-garde restaurateurs. We determined the list of honorees after analyzing more than five million reviews of more than 20,000 restaurants across the country -- all submitted by verified diners.

Read the rest here.

WSJ explores widening housing price gap in Denver

The Wall Street Journal looked at the widening gap between the middle and upper tiers of home prices in Denver and other cities.

Excerpt:

Amy LaBorde has seen all sides of the inventory crunch, both as a homeowner and real-estate agent in the Denver area. Of the nation's top 20 housing markets, Denver has the second-lowest inventory of existing homes, according to John Burns Real Estate Consulting of Irvine, Calif.

Ms. LaBorde and her fiancé were looking to trade up to a larger home in Boulder, Colo., and were outbid several times, including once by nearly $100,000. So they have decided to stay put in their Denver home until the market evens out.

"It's just not a great time to buy because of the competition," Ms. LaBorde said. "A lot of people are just sitting there waiting, because what they're looking for doesn't exist in their price range any more."

Read the rest here.

Airways News takes a "Mile-Highatus" on inaugural Virgin America flight to DIA

Airways News covered the first Virgin America flight from San Francisco to Denver.

Excerpt:

Virgin America CEO David Cush spoke following Hancock. He said the new route connects two of America's most important tech-focused cities, and added that Denver had been its highest demand new city from customers, prior to being announced. The airline is offering three flights a day, each way from SFO to DEN. It will have plenty of competition from Denver's incumbent airlines as well. Frontier and Southwest also offer three each way, and United logs up to fourteen each way on weekdays.

Sir Richard Branson was on hand for the celebration, doing what he does best -- making PR reps nervous as he goes off-script. Though he's a minority shareholder in Virgin America, his role makes him somewhat of a King to David Cush, the Prime Minister. It's obvious that Branson receives the fandom and adoration, while it is Cush who runs the show. The crowd received Branson with loud applause as he took the podium. He joked that he was given talking points, but had stuck the note cards in his back pocket. Branson noted that he has been at every single city inauguration for Virgin America. Branson shared that Denver is one of his favorite places to have fun, saying, "We're going to a state that has sensible, liberal, rational policies where we can all have a lot of fun and not be dragged off by the police." He's known for skiing in Colorado regularly and also said, "If I lived in America, I would live in Denver."

Read the rest here.

Bookbar included on Men's Journal list of top bookstore bars

Men's Journal included Bookbar in Denver's Berkeley neighborhood on its list of the seven coolest bookstore bars on the planet.

Excerpt:

Bookbar embraces the funky and rugged, yet literary, scene of Denver. Set in a charming, open-space brick building, with space for hosting readings and book groups, the bookstore-bar opened in 2013 with an all-Colorado beer list, a unique international wine program, and a whimsical, book-themed small-plates and pizzetta menu.

Read the rest here.

The Guardian covers "420 friendly" tourism industry in Denver

The Guardian published a piece on the "420 friendly" tourism industry in Denver.

Excerpt:

Last year, the site budandbreakfast.com was launched -- think of it as a kind of Airbnb for pot-friendly hosts with an extra room to rent. Naturally, this upset the Schneiders, who had built their own brand with Bud+Breakfast and say they stand apart from the sharing economy.

But the sharing economy model of marijuana lodging has become big business in Denver, where many have taken the sketchy liberty of signing long-term leases on several properties, then renting them out to cannabis smokers for hundreds of dollars a night. Founder of potguide.com (a national resource for traveling stoners, which also helps tourists find "420 friendly" lodging), Jeremy Bamford says that public consumption laws need to be adjusted to meet the demand of pot-smoking tourists.

"There are a lot of tourists here, and [Denver city officials] are forcing them to break the law," Bamford said.

Read the rest here.

BWBacon blog offers interview tips from Denver tech execs

Denver-based IT staffing firm BWBacon Group posted some interview advice from local tech execs.

Excerpt:

Geoffrey Cullins -- Sr. Director of Engineering @ GutCheck

If you don’t know the answer to a question, just say so. If I ask you a question, I probably know the answer so I’ll know if you’re BS-ing me. It almost always results in me mentally dismissing you, because if you can’t know yourself well enough when you’re trying to get a job, you’re going to really fail when it counts.

Read the rest here.

Tabelog touts Lowry Beer Garden

Lowry Beer Garden ranked third on "America's 9 Best Beer Gardens" list by Tabelog, Japan's answer to Zagat.

Excerpt:

Occupying a converted airplane hangar, Lowry Beer Garden in Denver, CO really delivers with their 4,500 square foot outdoor space. Long picnic tables under retractable awnings and string lights give the setting a festive air. Or you could sit under the massive covered patio. Lowry's is self-service, with different counters for food and beer. The menu is simple stadium-style food, but done in gourmet fashion. Burgers, dogs and salads dominate the menu, with Lowry's Brats taking center stage. The fried pickles and jumbo pretzels are a must order. The beer menu at Lowry's is extensive, boasting 16 taps and over 80 bottle varieties.

Read the rest here.

Rover.com names Denver one of the most dog-friendly cities

Rover.com named Denver to its list of "The 8 Most Dog-Friendly Cities in America."

Excerpt:

The Denver area is full of amazing trails, many of which welcome well-trained, off-leash dogs. Check out 303 Magazine's recommendations for some of the best dog-friendly hiking in the area!

Back in the city proper, don't pass up the dog-friendliest spot in town, the Watering Bowl, a.k.a. "your best friend's bar." At the Watering Bowl, you can enjoy an adult beverage and tasty snack while your dog romps around the pub's 7,000 sq. ft. fully fenced private dog park.

Read the rest here.

Econsult Solutions blogs on Denver transit transformation

Econsult Solutions President Richard Voith blogged about Denver's transit-oriented transformation.

Excerpt:

In 1990, The City of Denver had 468,139 people, and 237,926 jobs. Downtown Denver was a sleepy place largely devoid of people in the evening. Only a handful of people lived downtown back then.
 
The area surrounding the downtown was, like many cities, home to low and moderate income residents while growth was concentrated in the suburban towns surrounding Denver: the eastern suburb of Aurora became the third largest city and the western suburb of Lakewood became the fourth largest. The Denver metropolitan area was a decidedly auto-oriented place; there was no rail transit in Denver and its once proud Union Station was in disrepair, seeing only one long-distance train each way per day.
 
But Denver created a vision; note the active tense. Local leaders sought to make the Denver metropolitan area into something great. They decided to build a new airport and a new transit system. In the early 1990s, Denver took its first steps towards establishing a light rail transit system in the region, and in 1994 the Central Corridor, a light rail line through Denver's Five Points district, opened without the aid of tax increases or federal funds. The same year, the Regional Transportation District (RTD) received permission from the Federal Transit Administration (FTA) to begin preliminary engineering and environmental impact statement for the Southwest Light Rail Project. In 1996, the FTA awarded $120 million which was augmented by $18 milling in Highway "flex" funds for the new light rail line. Construction began in 1997 and the line opened in July of 2000. Denver never looked back.

Read the rest here.

Violent Femmes frontman praises Denver's Mexican food in Guardian interview

Violent Femmes frontman Gordon Gano praised the cheese enchilada from a Denver landmark in a recent interview with The Guardian.

Excerpt:

I like Mexican food very much, and this is my all-time favourite Mexican restaurant. One thing that’s very popular in Denver and the southwest of the United States is green chilli, and theirs is just a beautiful balance of the flavours. It goes on whatever you’re ordering. I’m vegetarian, so it limits what I get, but theirs is the best cheese enchilada I’ve ever had.

Read the rest here.

Denver tops U.S. News & World Report "best places to live" list

Denver came in at no. 1 on U.S. News & World Report's "20 Best Places to Live" list.

Excerpt:

The Mile High City is a burgeoning tech hub and a popular destination for millennials looking to start their careers. Voted the fourth most desirable city in a survey of people from across the country, Denver has one of the healthiest job markets in the country and has an above-average median annual salary, which goes further than in more expensive cities like Austin, Raleigh-Durham or Seattle.

Read the rest here.

Mic casts Denver as "unexpected startup mecca"

Mic published a piece on Denver's emergence as a startup "mecca."

Excerpt:

"There's largely a rejection of burnout culture here in Colorado," Espeland told Mic. "When you go to the coasts, you often see people working 20 hours a day and sleeping in their offices. Here, we value not doing that, and we believe that actually makes us move faster."

This environment is one of the reasons why Denver has quietly become one of the fastest-growing startup meccas in the United States. In 2015, Denver startups attracted more than $822 million in venture capital funding, with companies in the technology, energy, food and marijuana sectors leading the way. The city also routinely ranks as one of the best cities to live as a millennial, and young people from across America are flocking to the state in record numbers to build Denver-based business.

Perhaps the most remarkable part of the Denver success story is that much of the city's growth has taken place in only the past five years.

Read the rest here.

Mile High Connects discusses transit equity at Stanford Social Innovation Review

Mile High Connects Executive Director Dace West pushed for transit equity in a piece published by Stanford Social Innovation Review

Excerpt:

In 2004, Denver voters approved FasTracks, a $7.8 billion transit expansion, adding 122 miles of new light rail, 18 miles of bus rapid transit, and enhanced regional bus service to the region. Construction is currently under way on the multi-decade project, with four new rail and bus rapid transit lines opening in 2016 alone. Bolstered by early support from the Ford Foundation, local nonprofits and funders came together to take advantage of a historic opportunity and formed MHC in 2011. MHC is a cross-sector collaborative of nonprofits, foundations, businesses, and government leaders in the Denver region that makes an explicit connection between public transit and health equity.

MHC's goal is to ensure that Denver's transit build-out benefits low-income communities and communities of color by connecting them to affordable housing, healthy environments, high-quality education, and well-paying jobs. MHC serves as a backbone organization, influencing local and regional policies, leveraging and deploying resources, and helping residents of low-income communities and communities of color engage directly in decision making that affects their lives.

MHC's first public act was to create the Denver Regional Equity Atlas. The document starkly contrasted the relationship between new transit lines and issues of importance to the region's low-income communities, including the location of affordable housing, job centers, health-care institutions, and high- and low-performing schools, and how they were connected (or not) to the new tax-funded transit lines. Now an online interactive tool used by both community residents and decision makers, the Equity Atlas demonstrates that areas with lower incomes and higher concentrations of people of color have less access to healthy food, walkable blocks, and health centers, as well as significantly higher numbers of households that are burdened with relatively high housing and transportation costs. Over time, the tool has become important not only to document current disparities, but also to show population-level outcomes across the region.

Read the rest here.
653 Articles | Page: | Show All
Signup for Email Alerts