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84 Golden Triangle Articles | Page: | Show All

L.A. Times catches up with Denver's Laundry Truck

The Los Angeles Times spotlighted Denver's Laundry Truck in a feature that called the aid to homelss people "simple and innovative."

An excerpt:

“You need 13,000 watts running through the truck to make it work,” said Tim Reinen, executive director of Radian Inc., a nonprofit design group that worked with Bayaud on the truck. “Then you have six dryers operating simultaneously at 120 degrees heated by propane.”

And an 800-pound generator mounted underneath.

After several redesigns and $90,000 in donations, the truck hit the streets in April. Denver Water, a city utility, lets it hook up to fire hydrants for water and provides a meter to measure how much it uses. Since then the truck has washed 660 loads, or about 10,000 pounds of laundry."

Read the full story here.
 

Construction Equipment magazine offers comprehensive take on I-70's innovative jobs program

The innovative jobs program for the Interstate 70 renovation project was big news in the construction industry.  Illinois-based Construction Equipment magazine offered a suprisingly thorough look, showing how different constituenices value news differently.

It is a unique program, as the story points out:

"An estimated 350 workers will be drawn from the area and provided with training to build the Central 70 project now and a good career as time goes on."

The training is real -- and funded:

"Using a $400,000 federal grant received last year, CDOT will partner with Gary Community Investments (GCI) to provide more than $1 million for training and support programs, including child care so residents can take advantage of the training opportunities and jobs.  Last year the U.S. Department of Transportation gave CDOT – one of only nine other transportation agencies nationwide – permission to pilot a local-hire program for Central 70."

Read the whole story here.

 

Bloun Art Info notes major donation to Denver Art Museum

Blouin Art Info noted that the Denver Art Museum will receive significant works as part of a donation from the
Colección Patricia Phelps de Cisneros,

Here's an excerpt:

"According to CPPC, “The donation seeks to expand the geographical and temporal horizons of these institutions’ collections, expand scholarship, and offer a broader, more diverse and inclusive vision of Latin American artistic production from the 17th century to the mid-19th century.”

CPPC’s colonial art collection was formed with the aim of creating a broad representation of Venezuelan art from the mid-1600s to the mid-1800s. The core is complemented by works from the viceroyalties of New Spain (Mexico) and Peru as well as elsewhere in the Spanish Caribbean."

Read the rest of the article here.     
 

PBS NewsHour covers "Mi Tierra" at DAM

The new exhibit at the Denver Art Museum delves into the Mexican-American experience.

Excerpt:

RAMIRO GOMEZ: It's important for me to highlight these people that are not going to be recorded in our history.

JEFFREY BROWN: In Denver, Gomez was one of 13 young Mexican-American artists chosen for an exhibition called Mi Tierra, their assignment, to create a new work that explores the idea of home and place in the American West.
There were smaller paintings and large installations, videos about the land before Europeans settled here, and a garden that looked like a giant pinata.

Many of the artists tackled the politically charged topic of immigration. This piece contained an actual panel of the U.S.-Mexico border fence.

RAMIRO GOMEZ: For me, place becomes a very difficult word to focus on, just because place is never permanent. We're constantly moving. It's constantly shifting.

I'm an American-born child to Mexican immigrants. So, I'm at once Mexican and American. I'm in between. That in-between space, that in-between place that I occupy is something that is constantly changing within myself.

Watch and read the rest here.

Expedia names Denver one of "America's most artistic towns"

The travel site included Denver in a roundup of artsy cities of all sizes.

Excerpt:

Denver is miles ahead when it comes to the best cities for art. Denver Art Museum houses diverse permanent collections from across the globe, and attracts world-class exhibits on the regular. Night owls should join Untitled Final Fridays (January through October), which include special programs, workshops, and “tours with a twist” after the sun goes down. RiNo (or the River North Arts District, if you're fancy) transformed warehouses and factories into galleries, working studios, and more than a few places to catch live music and a good drink. When you need a place to crash, hit up the ART Hotel, which seriously stays true to its name.

Read the rest here.

Adelaide looks to Denver for lessons

An InDaily story looked at what economic lessons the capital of South Australia could learn from Colorado's capital city.

Excerpt:

In 2015, Denver was named as [most] liveable city in the west and the fourth-best metro area for science, technology, engineering and mathematics professionals in America. More than 38 per cent of Colorado's adult population has completed a bachelor's degree or higher. In 2015, Colorado was also ranked as the second-most entrepreneurial State in America.

Adelaide, like Denver, provides a very high quality of life, affordable housing, quality health care, a ready supply of commercial property for lease or purchase, friendly people, a well-educated work force, and many other attributes that mirror Denver's. Adelaide's countryside is very attractive, tourism is well targeted and events are significantly supported.

Adelaide Airport has improved quite dramatically since the 1990s. Adelaide Oval is a world class venue. So why hasn't Adelaide grown at anything like the very fast rate of Denver?

Read the rest here.

Mayor Hancock gives Denver travel tips to U.S. News & World Report

His picks included LoDo, the Denver Art Museum and Red Rocks.

Excerpt:

Denver Mayor Michael Hancock has been a key force behind efforts to ramp up tourism in the Mile High City since being elected in 2011, working to expand direct flights to Denver International Airport and improve the airport's facilities. A longtime Denver resident now in his second term, Hancock has seen firsthand how much the city has grown and changed over the years. He says Denver has a special quality that makes the city unique.

"There’s a certain spirit in this city you don’t find everywhere," he tells U.S. News. "It’s a very optimistic, forward-thinking, positive spirit that permeates every sector and every individual."

. . .

Describe your perfect day in Denver.

My family and I would go have brunch at Snooze or one of the great diners in Denver, like the Denver Diner downtown. Then we would go walk the dogs in City Park. Then maybe we’d go to the Denver Zoo, which is well-respected around the country. The primates and the elephants are my favorite animal exhibits. At night, we’d have dinner, then we would go find somewhere to enjoy live music because Denver has more live music venues than Austin, Texas. I love listening to jazz at El Chapultepec and Jazz at Jacks. The Soiled Dove Underground in [the neighborhood of] Lowry has great sound and gets some national acts.

Read the rest here.

Fox News spotlights Rise of the Rest in Denver

The story posed a big question: "What can other cities learn from Denver about how the rest can rise?"

Excerpt:

Today, we toured Denver on a bus to see an entrepreneurial ecosystem that, actually, compared to many places, is doing pretty well. According to the Kauffman Foundation, Denver is one of the top five cities in startup activity, and Colorado ranks fourth out of 50 states. Two decades ago, that wouldn’t have been the case. As we visit cities across the country, we often hear what's not working -- we need more capital, more connectivity, better founders.

While Denver is self-aware that they can do so much more, they're on an encouraging pathway to how a community can do its best. At lunch, Steve Case talked about the "three Ps" of the Web's Third Wave. In reflecting on Denver, I saw three Ps that have made Colorado a great startup community.

Read the rest here.

TimeOut calls Denver fifth-best city lo live in the U.S.

Denver ranked on the list high due to its parks, proximity to the Rockies, transit, music and beer -- plus legal marijuana.

Excerpt:

Denver is one of the fastest-growing cities in the nation, boasting 83,000 new residents since 2010. Educated millennials lead the charge, drawn to Denver's cool music scene, dozens of breweries, public transportation network -- including bike share -- and, in some cases, the legalization of marijuana in Colorado. 

Read the rest here.

Telegraph asks: "Is Denver becoming America's coolest city?"

The British newspaper peered into the city in a travel feature and came away with an appreciation for its beer, art and most everything else.

Excerpt:

The first permanent building in Denver wasn’t a church, a home or a bank; it was a saloon. Now, more than 150 years after gold prospectors first began to arrive, Denverites still clearly love their beer.

. . .

Simply strolling or cycling around the city (Denverites love bikes as much as they love beer) gives you an idea of the remarkable amount of choice here for hop-heads. There’s a German brewery (Prost Brewing Company), an English brewery (Hogshead), a hippy brewery (Vine Street Pub & Brewery), and even a heavy metal brewery (TRVE Brewing Company). For the truly thirsty, you can seamlessly link many of the best establishments together, on foot or bike, via the popular Denver Beer Trail, with free downloadable maps. The Denver Beer Fest, a nine-day gala of local brews held in the autumn, is an enjoyable way to tap into the scene, and the Great American Beer Festival, following swiftly behind, showcases more than 3,000 beers from across the USA at Denver’s Colorado Convention Center.

But it's not all about pints and pitchers: Denver as a whole is very much on the up. The second fastest growing city in the country after Austin, it’s also chasing down the Texan capital in the cool stakes too. A magnet for young professionals, the active and outdoorsy, it’s one of the youngest cities in the US too, with a median population age of just 34. 

Read the rest here.

Tech.Co outlines "10 Denver Startups You Need to Know About"

For Denver Startup Week, Tech.Co published a list of the "10 Denver Startups You Need to Know About," including Gusto, Revolar and MassRoots.

Excerpt:

With beautiful mountains, legal marijuana, and 300 days of sunshine a year, it's no wonder millions of people have begun to flock to the popular Colorado city. Whether it's new college graduates looking to settle down somewhere adventurous or seasoned entrepreneurs looking to capitalize on a new market, there is no shortage of new blood entering Denver on a regular basis. But what does that mean for the startups in this burgeoning ecosystem? It means it's exploding as fast as the population.

Luckily for you, Denver Startup Week will provide an opportunity for you to take a look at all the entrepreneurial talent present in the Mile High City. This five-day celebration (September 12-16) will showcase everyone from on-demand travel concierge services to innovative intelligence startups, Denver provides the perfect ecosystem for new customers, innovative ideas, and enticing returns.

Read the rest here.

Next City spotlights workforce development in Denver

Next City reported on the decentralization and expansion of workforce development by the Denver Office of Economic Development.

Excerpt:

Before this year, there weren't many spots in Denver where an unemployed person could get help stepping back into the job stream. A small cluster of employment service centers were huddled in the heart of the city, but most of its 11 districts were largely unserved.

Now that the Office of Economic Development (OED) has decided to divide Denver's job training programs out to private contractors, the number of government-funded work and economic assistance centers will jump seven-fold, going from seven to nearly 50 and spanning across all 11 districts instead of only five.

"People can access these services where they're comfortable instead of traveling [into downtown]," says Denise Bryant, director of the OED's workforce development program. "We have contractors and subcontractors that are now actually in the community."

Read the rest here.

Apto, WellTok, Tender Belly make Inc. 5000

Denver-based Apto, SurvWest, WellTok, BridgeHealth Medical, Stoneside Blinds & Shades, Digital Fusion, Tender Belly and PlanOmatic all made the Inc. 5000 2016 list of fastest-growing companies in the U.S.

Excerpt:

Apto

Provides Web-based software that helps real estate brokers manage customer relationships, properties, listings, deals, and back-office tasks.

2016 INC. 5000 RANK: #175
  • 3-Year Growth: 2,079%
  • 2015 Revenue: $2.3 M
  • Location: Denver, CO
  • Industry: Software
  • Launched: 2012
Read the rest here.

WSJ covers Galvanize's $45M raise

Denver-based Galvanize raised $45 million to expand its educational offerings, reported The Wall Street Journal.

Excerpt:

As more technical education moves to nontraditional programs, it has become increasingly difficult for recruiters to develop standards with which to assess and compare these nascent coding programs. Some academic researchers and trade groups are looking to create a standard database of coding boot camps and online courses.

Mr. Deters said that Galvanize does not aim to replace four-year programs but rather fill the gaps and help engineers be prepared with the skills most highly in demand in today’s workforce. He said the company is planning to collaborate with universities more in the future.

Currently, the six month web development program costs $21,000, while the data science program is $17,000. According to the College Board, the average price of in-state tuition for a public university during the 2015-2016 school year was $9,410. For private colleges, that cost was $32,405.

Read the rest here.

Interior Design magazine spotlights new builds in Denver

A story in Interior Design magazine shined a light on six new builds in Denver.

Within Denver proper, thoughtful new builds continue to emerge that counter a recent in-flux of arguably generic mixed-use, multi-family, and McMansion development. 4100 Bryant, a new single-family residence within the fabric of an urban residential neighborhood by Boulder-based firm Studio B Architecture + Interiors provides a fresh interpretation of the city's proliferation of mid-century homes. The seemingly linear home blurs the line between interior and exterior with the overt insertion of a bold centralized volume including an open courtyard made complete with a swimming pool.

Other notable projects include "The Boathouse," by Denver-based firm Shears Adkins Rockmore, a playful response to creating office space that captures a scale, character, and site response that appeals to Denver's large millennial population and informal culture. "Sushi-Rama," a playful Warhol-and-Lichtenstein-inspired design by LIVStudio is one of a smattering of new restaurants where the environment is as creative as the food. On the cultural front, the highly-anticipated relocation of the Kirkland Museum of Decorative and Fine Arts by Olson Kundig is slated to open in late 2017.

Read the rest here.
84 Golden Triangle Articles | Page: | Show All
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