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61 The Highlands Articles | Page: | Show All

Mayor Hancock gives Denver travel tips to U.S. News & World Report

His picks included LoDo, the Denver Art Museum and Red Rocks.

Excerpt:

Denver Mayor Michael Hancock has been a key force behind efforts to ramp up tourism in the Mile High City since being elected in 2011, working to expand direct flights to Denver International Airport and improve the airport's facilities. A longtime Denver resident now in his second term, Hancock has seen firsthand how much the city has grown and changed over the years. He says Denver has a special quality that makes the city unique.

"There’s a certain spirit in this city you don’t find everywhere," he tells U.S. News. "It’s a very optimistic, forward-thinking, positive spirit that permeates every sector and every individual."

. . .

Describe your perfect day in Denver.

My family and I would go have brunch at Snooze or one of the great diners in Denver, like the Denver Diner downtown. Then we would go walk the dogs in City Park. Then maybe we’d go to the Denver Zoo, which is well-respected around the country. The primates and the elephants are my favorite animal exhibits. At night, we’d have dinner, then we would go find somewhere to enjoy live music because Denver has more live music venues than Austin, Texas. I love listening to jazz at El Chapultepec and Jazz at Jacks. The Soiled Dove Underground in [the neighborhood of] Lowry has great sound and gets some national acts.

Read the rest here.

Fox News spotlights Denver women brewers making a statement

"Makin Noise: A Pussy Riot Beer" was first produced in December at Goldspot Brewing.

Excerpt:

Female brewers in Denver, Colo. are taking a stand against oppression, sexism and anti-LGBT sentiments by collaborating to produce a series of craft brews that will be released leading up to president-elect Donald Trump's inauguration later this month. 

The first batch of "Makin Noise: A Pussy Riot Beer" was produced on Dec. 28 at Goldspot Brewing. Kelissa Hieber, Goldspot's head brewer and one of the group's key organizers, told FoxNews.com that the goal of the project isn't about promoting anti-Trumpism (though she admitted to Westword that many felt "defeated" and "helpless" after the election) but rather to foster unity among likeminded individuals and beer lovers.

"Despite a kneejerk reaction to assume that an inauguration day release insinuates a protest to Trump, however our only desire for this beer to to insight a larger sense of community and to stand up against injustice," Hieber said.

Read the rest here.

Lonely Planet pegs Denver among 10 best U.S. destinations for 2017

The city was ranked no. 9 on the travel publisher's annual list for its sunshine, beer, access to skiing and hip neighborhoods.

Excerpt:
 
Home of the bearded and the buff, Denver's aspen-tinged allure has never been greater. The secret is out: ample sunshine, a brewery on every corner and an endless supply of adrenaline-firing fun are fuelling the Rocky Mountain rush. And those lofty alpine summits aren't the only highs in town -- revamped Union Station is at the heart of new developments like the Ski Train, which in 2017 will whisk skiers direct from downtown to Winter Park's powdery bliss. Throw a vibrant economy into the mix, and you get artsy districts like RiNo (River North) and LoHi (Lower Highlands), where you can replenish your calories in slow-food market halls, bookended by gallery hopping and a night out with some rootsy, denim-clad rockers.

Read the rest here.

Zagat tabs Denver as no. 3 food city in U.S.

Only Washington, D.C., and Los Angeles topped Denver on the 25-city list.

Excerpt:

The best city for singles. For millennials. For entrepreneurs. For outdoorspeople. Over the past few years, Denver has ranked at or near the top of virtually every U.S. index there is; it was only a matter of time before outsiders "discovered" its dynamic dining scene too. This year alone, Nobu MatsuhisaGregory GourdetDeborah Schneider and Hugh Acheson staked claims here; Jeffrey Wall of Atlanta's Kimball House is on his way, and so is the team behind New York's Death & Co.

Meanwhile, there's no stopping our homegrown talent. Beard award-winners Bobby Stuckey and Lachlan Mackinnon-Patterson (Frasca) will be opening Tavernetta soon; fellow recipient Jennifer Jasinski (Rioja et al.) is expanding her mini empire with Ultreia. 

Read the rest here.

Chicago Tribune explores Denver food markets

The story looked at The Source, Avanti, Union Station and Central Market, as well as Aurora's Stanley Marketplace.

Excerpt:

Ask anyone who has lived for at least a few years in this gateway to the Rocky Mountains, and they'll say Denver has changed.

It's younger and edgier, and it bubbles with an energy wholly absent when the city was "nothing but a big ol' cow town in the early '80s," as one local said. Like most places, the change is principally seen in rising home prices (bad!) and a blossoming food and drink scene (good!).
 
But the food and drink explosion has come in one particularly broad and curious form: the food market.

Read the rest here.

People profiles Feral founder

Jimmy Funkhouser of Denver's Feral Mountain Company was the subject of an "American Doers" video and profile in People magazine.

Excerpt:

It wasn't easy for 34-year-old Jimmy Funkhouser to leave his small hometown of Elberfeld, Indiana, and it was even harder to leave his nine younger siblings.

"It was hard. As the oldest, I’ve always had this sense of wanting to set an example," Funkhouser tells PEOPLE. "I think being the oldest naturally instills within you this nature of blazing a path."

This year, Funkhouser quit his 10-year corporate job, moved to Denver, Colorado and started on his mission for achieving his own American Dream -- opening a mountain gear shop.

Read the rest here.

High Times picks its favorite munchies in Denver

The cannabis-friendly magazine chose 10 of its favorite post-smoke eateries in the city.

Excerpt:

Since legalization of cannabis in Denver, Colorado, the urban landscape has experienced a surge of marijuana enthusiasts and medical refugees alike looking to make a home in the Mile High City. Abandoned properties once stuck motionless in a state of decay have been revived by grow operations and newly legal businesses. What was once derelict has been brought back to life, breathing energy into the city streets.
 
Taking part in a cultural revolution can cause one to work up an appetite, so as one of those marijuana enthusiasts new to Denver, you might be asking yourself, "Where are the best places to eat while stoned?"

Well, we're here to help you find the best munchie fixes in the city with expert recommendations from a top cannabis chef, complete with pairing tips for primo pot strains  -- so get ready to blaze before stepping foot into one of these fine establishments!

Read the rest here.

TimeOut calls Denver fifth-best city lo live in the U.S.

Denver ranked on the list high due to its parks, proximity to the Rockies, transit, music and beer -- plus legal marijuana.

Excerpt:

Denver is one of the fastest-growing cities in the nation, boasting 83,000 new residents since 2010. Educated millennials lead the charge, drawn to Denver's cool music scene, dozens of breweries, public transportation network -- including bike share -- and, in some cases, the legalization of marijuana in Colorado. 

Read the rest here.

Telegraph asks: "Is Denver becoming America's coolest city?"

The British newspaper peered into the city in a travel feature and came away with an appreciation for its beer, art and most everything else.

Excerpt:

The first permanent building in Denver wasn’t a church, a home or a bank; it was a saloon. Now, more than 150 years after gold prospectors first began to arrive, Denverites still clearly love their beer.

. . .

Simply strolling or cycling around the city (Denverites love bikes as much as they love beer) gives you an idea of the remarkable amount of choice here for hop-heads. There’s a German brewery (Prost Brewing Company), an English brewery (Hogshead), a hippy brewery (Vine Street Pub & Brewery), and even a heavy metal brewery (TRVE Brewing Company). For the truly thirsty, you can seamlessly link many of the best establishments together, on foot or bike, via the popular Denver Beer Trail, with free downloadable maps. The Denver Beer Fest, a nine-day gala of local brews held in the autumn, is an enjoyable way to tap into the scene, and the Great American Beer Festival, following swiftly behind, showcases more than 3,000 beers from across the USA at Denver’s Colorado Convention Center.

But it's not all about pints and pitchers: Denver as a whole is very much on the up. The second fastest growing city in the country after Austin, it’s also chasing down the Texan capital in the cool stakes too. A magnet for young professionals, the active and outdoorsy, it’s one of the youngest cities in the US too, with a median population age of just 34. 

Read the rest here.

DRAFT names two Denver spots among "25 breweries on the rise"

Black Project Spontaneous & Wild Ales (formerly Former Future Brewing Co.) and Call to Arms Brewing Co. made DRAFT's national roundup of "25 breweries on the rise."

Excerpt:

James and Sarah Howat began fermenting the first Black Project beer in February 2014 in a back room at Former Future, the Denver brewery they were preparing to launch. Both breweries have found success, but Black Project stayed under classified status for a while.The husband-and-wife duo didn’t even tell most Former Future employees what was happening in that room; it remained an Area 51 until eight months later. Once the first Black Project beer was released, the floodgates opened. Geeks clamored for the sour and funky brews, all made with native, wild microflora (the Howats don’t purchase any yeast for Black Project beers from a lab).

Read the rest here.

Next City spotlights workforce development in Denver

Next City reported on the decentralization and expansion of workforce development by the Denver Office of Economic Development.

Excerpt:

Before this year, there weren't many spots in Denver where an unemployed person could get help stepping back into the job stream. A small cluster of employment service centers were huddled in the heart of the city, but most of its 11 districts were largely unserved.

Now that the Office of Economic Development (OED) has decided to divide Denver's job training programs out to private contractors, the number of government-funded work and economic assistance centers will jump seven-fold, going from seven to nearly 50 and spanning across all 11 districts instead of only five.

"People can access these services where they're comfortable instead of traveling [into downtown]," says Denise Bryant, director of the OED's workforce development program. "We have contractors and subcontractors that are now actually in the community."

Read the rest here.

Paste reports on Denver's Sesh Fest

Paste quaffed a few low-alcohol beers at Denver's annual Sesh Fest.

Excerpt:

The point is simple: "Session beer" as an idea continues to be embraced and grow, but it still has plenty of room to diversify itself in the minds of beer drinkers and the lineups of breweries.

In Denver, and at Sesh Fest, this thankfully does seem to be happening, at least to a degree. In the Mile-High City, one would think the physical effects of altitude might naturally lead to a more robust appreciation for camping and hiking-friendly low-ABV beer styles, and this is at least partially the case, according to a few brewers I spoke with at the event. It was an unusually smooth, easygoing beer festival, and it would be hard to deny that the concept isn't great, as a session beer fest can simultaneously encourage eclectic sampling and relative moderation. Eric Nichols, the head brewer at Beryl's Beer Co. in Denver's beer-rich River North neighborhood, said the event was indicative of the session beer culture that has grown in the city during the two years that Beryl has been in operation.

"I think if you live here, more than the altitude, it's the active lifestyles you tend to find in Colorado that are driving session beer here," Nichols said. "Most people here aren't drinking to get blitzed, and they're very outdoor-focused. Session styles are perfect to incorporate into that."

Read the rest here.

 

Interior Design magazine spotlights new builds in Denver

A story in Interior Design magazine shined a light on six new builds in Denver.

Within Denver proper, thoughtful new builds continue to emerge that counter a recent in-flux of arguably generic mixed-use, multi-family, and McMansion development. 4100 Bryant, a new single-family residence within the fabric of an urban residential neighborhood by Boulder-based firm Studio B Architecture + Interiors provides a fresh interpretation of the city's proliferation of mid-century homes. The seemingly linear home blurs the line between interior and exterior with the overt insertion of a bold centralized volume including an open courtyard made complete with a swimming pool.

Other notable projects include "The Boathouse," by Denver-based firm Shears Adkins Rockmore, a playful response to creating office space that captures a scale, character, and site response that appeals to Denver's large millennial population and informal culture. "Sushi-Rama," a playful Warhol-and-Lichtenstein-inspired design by LIVStudio is one of a smattering of new restaurants where the environment is as creative as the food. On the cultural front, the highly-anticipated relocation of the Kirkland Museum of Decorative and Fine Arts by Olson Kundig is slated to open in late 2017.

Read the rest here.

NY Times looks at Denver's many millennial lures

The New York Times looked at what's luring millennials to Denver, including openness, bars, transit and weed.

Excerpt:

The youthful party continues on many nights around the renovated Union Station in the trendy Lower Downtown district, known locally as LoDo, and along Larimer Street in River North, or RiNo. It was unclear on a recent evening whether there were more bars than signs supporting Bernie Sanders, but both were plentiful. Scruffy Murphy's Irish Pub, Los Chingones' rooftop bar and the Wynkoop Brewing Company (one of 65 microbreweries here, according to the Colorado Brewers Guild) were all doing a brisk business.

As for the Vermont senator, so popular with millennials, he was depicted on a two-story painted wall mural -- like something you'd see in Los Angeles or Belfast celebrating heroes -- with a fist raised and the slogan "Rise Together!"

This is also an apt slogan for this city, which has risen from economic stagnation and urban irrelevance to become a millennial magnet.

Read the rest here.

Guardian story delves into gentrification and white privilege in Denver

A story in The Guardian took a look at gentrification and white privilege in Denver.

Excerpt:

For the first time in its history, Denver is so crowded, so desirable, that the "endless" neighbourhoods of bungalows are proving finite. There’s not enough space for everyone who wants a front porch and backyard a stone’s throw from downtown, in a historic neighbourhood with a high "walk score" (the area’s walkability). The cost of this growth is the displacement of the city’s remaining working class, and the city government, cashing in on the boom, is leading the process.

While the neighbourhoods south and east of downtown have always been expensive and predominately white, until recently those north of downtown remained lower-income and mainly Latino, alongside descendants of other immigrant communities -- Italian, Irish, and Eastern European. North-west Denver, or Northside (which includes the neighbourhoods Highland, Sunnyside, and Berkeley), has the iconic grid: brick houses and century-old shade trees, interspersed with former "streetcar downtowns". It didn’t take much time after being discovered for the neighbourhoods to gentrify.

Read the rest here.
61 The Highlands Articles | Page: | Show All
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