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170 LoDo Articles | Page: | Show All

Norfolk, the latest city to witness, and envy, Denver transit

Jordan Pascale, who covers transportation for The Virginian-Pilot, writes about RTD's light rail to DIA and uses it as a platform for discussing the transit system in Norfolk.

He writes:

"I’m convinced, now more than ever, that if Norfolk’s proposed light-rail extension doesn’t go to Norfolk International Airport, then we’ve made a huge mistake."

He's good at explaining how it works:

"Technically it’s designated commuter rail – the cars look a bit more like subway cars on the outside and have a higher capacity than Norfolk’s light rail but still feel like light rail on the inside."

And he points out its peculiarities, which is kind of entertaining:

"One odd thing that I noticed: police and other personnel stationed at each crossing gate holding stop signs as the train passed. They had umbrellas set up and everything to keep them out of the heat. I thought it was just a weird Colorado law.

Turns out the gates have been malfunctioning. The private consortium is footing nearly $6 million a year to staff the gates."

And this:

"Some things are confusing, especially to this out-of-towner. The airport line is called the “University of Colorado A Line” despite not serving any of the campuses. It’s merely a name sponsorship deal."

Read the whole story here.

 

Massachusetts reporter's marijuana travelogue tells what it's like to live in a pot-friendly state

Here's the set up:

"Larry Parnass, investigations editor for The Berkshire Eagle, is in Colorado reporting on that state’s experience with medical and recreational marijuana. With recreational markets expected to open in Massachusetts next year, Parnass is examining how more than three years of legal sales have changed Colorado."

One if his stops is at the River Rock Cannabis grow facility in North Denver, where he met with owner Norton Arbelaez:

"He opens one door and blinding light spills out. Cannabis plants crowd the room. They sit atop low, wheeled carts, their tops stirred by wall-mounted fans.

A bunch of plants. Well, hundreds of them. I decided that a flower room like this needed to be one of my first stops here in Colorado."

It's a colorful rendering, full of first-person musings, about a scene a lot of Coloradans still don't know much about.

Worth a read of the full story right here.
 

L.A. Times catches up with Denver's Laundry Truck

The Los Angeles Times spotlighted Denver's Laundry Truck in a feature that called the aid to homelss people "simple and innovative."

An excerpt:

“You need 13,000 watts running through the truck to make it work,” said Tim Reinen, executive director of Radian Inc., a nonprofit design group that worked with Bayaud on the truck. “Then you have six dryers operating simultaneously at 120 degrees heated by propane.”

And an 800-pound generator mounted underneath.

After several redesigns and $90,000 in donations, the truck hit the streets in April. Denver Water, a city utility, lets it hook up to fire hydrants for water and provides a meter to measure how much it uses. Since then the truck has washed 660 loads, or about 10,000 pounds of laundry."

Read the full story here.
 

Construction Equipment magazine offers comprehensive take on I-70's innovative jobs program

The innovative jobs program for the Interstate 70 renovation project was big news in the construction industry.  Illinois-based Construction Equipment magazine offered a suprisingly thorough look, showing how different constituenices value news differently.

It is a unique program, as the story points out:

"An estimated 350 workers will be drawn from the area and provided with training to build the Central 70 project now and a good career as time goes on."

The training is real -- and funded:

"Using a $400,000 federal grant received last year, CDOT will partner with Gary Community Investments (GCI) to provide more than $1 million for training and support programs, including child care so residents can take advantage of the training opportunities and jobs.  Last year the U.S. Department of Transportation gave CDOT – one of only nine other transportation agencies nationwide – permission to pilot a local-hire program for Central 70."

Read the whole story here.

 

Atlanta Journal-Constitution comes to Denver to write about good transporation ideas.

People in Denver may complain about public transportation on those days when the trains run slow, but, from the outside, things look pretty good. The Atlanta-Journal-Constitution, exploring ways its home city can plan for future transit needs, found some good ideas at work here.

"It’s the kind of complex transportation network experts say is needed to address traffic congestion in booming metro areas. And Atlanta officials are paying attention to Denver and other cities that are building those kind of networks.Metro Atlanta’s long-term transportation plan includes many of the elements the Mile High City already has: bus rapid transit, new light rail and streetcar lines, an extensive network of toll lanes for congested highways and new trails to encourage commuting by bike and on foot."

The story includes a nice summary of the history of light-rail. A good read for anyone here who doesn't know the evolution of our trianst system and what it can teach us about making big, bold moves:

"The Denver Regional Transportation District opened its first light rail line – a 5.3-mile stretch along I-25 in central Denver – in 1994. It proved so successful RTD had to order six more vehicles to carry passengers."

Read the whole story here.

 

Bloomberg says marijuana jobs are causing a shortage of restaurant workers in Denver

Bloomberg says marijuana jobs are causing a shortage of restaurant workers in Denver

Here's an excerpt:

The pot industry is taking a toll on local restaurant work forces and in some cases, liquor sales. “No one is talking about it,” said Bobby Stuckey, the James Beard award winning co-owner of Frasca Food and Wine in Boulder and the soon-to-open  Tavernetta in Denver. “But Colorado’s restaurant labor market is in Defcon 5 right now, because of weed facilities.” 

Denver’s population has been steadily growing. In 2016, U.S. News & World Report ranked it as the best place to live in the country because of its proximity to the great outdoors, along with the tech boom, among other things. The city is particularly popular with millennials. A boom in restaurants soon followed, transforming a sleepy culinary scene into a particularly vibrant one. (Another reason for the expanding dining scene is the $54 million Union Station renovation, which opened in 2014 and brought a concentration of fine dining spots downtown.) 

Read the rest here.

 

CNN Money segment takes Ski Train from Denver

CNN Money covered the comeback of the Ski Train from Denver to the slopes at Winter Park.

Excerpt:

Beat the traffic and ditch the car: Amtrak's "Winter Park Express" takes skiers--and their gear-- from downtown Denver, Colorado, to the Winter Park Resort, literally steps away from mountain chair lifts. The train climbs nearly 4,000 feet above Denver, cruises through 28 tunnels and gets you back to the city in time for dinner.

Permalink here.
 

NY Times spotlights Ryan McGinley show at MCA Denver

The show opens Feb. 11 at Museum of Contemporary Art Denver.

Excerpt:

In 1999, the photographer Ryan McGinley self-published "The Kids Are Alright," a book capturing his crew of downtown friends and lovers in varying states of nudity, ecstasy and reckless abandon. He shot prolifically, using up to 20 rolls of film a night. "At the time, it was really important to document my life because I was the only one out of my friends who was doing it," he says now. He sent copies of the handmade book to a few gallerists, curators and photographers he admired. Among them was Sylvia Wolf, then the head of the Department of Photography at the Whitney Museum, who helped arrange McGinley's breakout solo exhibition there in 2003. He was 26  -- one of the youngest artists ever to have a solo show at the museum.

But now, it all feels like ancient history. For "Ryan McGinley: The Kids Were Alright," a new show that opens at the Museum of Contemporary Art Denver this month, McGinley returned to the period between 1998 and 2003 -- unearthing some 1,500 Polaroids that have never been exhibited before. In revisiting these unfiltered images of his hedonistic past (self-portraits of him having sex, or friends masturbating and doing drugs) McGinley describes a kind of emotional release. "It wasn't painful, but in a way it was cathartic to have almost 20 years' distance on my photos and go through my archive and see how I grew up." He continues: "I'm very in touch with my vulnerability and I'm proud of those photos where it's really raw. It really was my life at the time."

Read the rest here.

ARTnews covers MCA Denver grant

The $400,000 grant from the Mellon Foundation will fund "Animating Museums" workshops.

Excerpt:

The Museum of Contemporary Art Denver announced yesterday that it has received a $400,000 grant from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation. The grant will go toward a three-year program, “Animating Museums,” for which professionals from around the world will be brought to Denver to host a series of workshops.

"Animating Museums" will start this summer with a ten-day residency. The next year, the fellows will participate in a series of webinars related to their fields, and the year after that, they will realize a major project, which the museum said will likely be "a large scale festival or similar activation." Applications to become a participant in the program are currently available at a site launched by the MCA.

Read the rest here.

Adelaide looks to Denver for lessons

An InDaily story looked at what economic lessons the capital of South Australia could learn from Colorado's capital city.

Excerpt:

In 2015, Denver was named as [most] liveable city in the west and the fourth-best metro area for science, technology, engineering and mathematics professionals in America. More than 38 per cent of Colorado's adult population has completed a bachelor's degree or higher. In 2015, Colorado was also ranked as the second-most entrepreneurial State in America.

Adelaide, like Denver, provides a very high quality of life, affordable housing, quality health care, a ready supply of commercial property for lease or purchase, friendly people, a well-educated work force, and many other attributes that mirror Denver's. Adelaide's countryside is very attractive, tourism is well targeted and events are significantly supported.

Adelaide Airport has improved quite dramatically since the 1990s. Adelaide Oval is a world class venue. So why hasn't Adelaide grown at anything like the very fast rate of Denver?

Read the rest here.

Mayor Hancock gives Denver travel tips to U.S. News & World Report

His picks included LoDo, the Denver Art Museum and Red Rocks.

Excerpt:

Denver Mayor Michael Hancock has been a key force behind efforts to ramp up tourism in the Mile High City since being elected in 2011, working to expand direct flights to Denver International Airport and improve the airport's facilities. A longtime Denver resident now in his second term, Hancock has seen firsthand how much the city has grown and changed over the years. He says Denver has a special quality that makes the city unique.

"There’s a certain spirit in this city you don’t find everywhere," he tells U.S. News. "It’s a very optimistic, forward-thinking, positive spirit that permeates every sector and every individual."

. . .

Describe your perfect day in Denver.

My family and I would go have brunch at Snooze or one of the great diners in Denver, like the Denver Diner downtown. Then we would go walk the dogs in City Park. Then maybe we’d go to the Denver Zoo, which is well-respected around the country. The primates and the elephants are my favorite animal exhibits. At night, we’d have dinner, then we would go find somewhere to enjoy live music because Denver has more live music venues than Austin, Texas. I love listening to jazz at El Chapultepec and Jazz at Jacks. The Soiled Dove Underground in [the neighborhood of] Lowry has great sound and gets some national acts.

Read the rest here.

Star Tribune reports on proposed Upstairs Circus in Minneapolis

The Denver-based bar offers customers crafts with their cocktails.

Excerpt:

Bar hoppers in downtown Minneapolis will likely have a new and more creative outlet beginning next summer.

Upstairs Circus, a Denver-based arts-and-crafts bar, is expected to sign papers soon to expand in the popular North Loop area, according to owners Matt and Kelly Johannsen.

At its two existing locations in Denver, Upstairs Circus offers guests the chance to sign up for “project socials” with friends or strangers. The events allow attendees to create projects while they imbibe. Individuals can choose from among a few dozen possibilities that range from making custom leather hip flasks or drink coolers to assembling tassel necklaces and devising urban silhouette art.

Read the rest here.

Lonely Planet pegs Denver among 10 best U.S. destinations for 2017

The city was ranked no. 9 on the travel publisher's annual list for its sunshine, beer, access to skiing and hip neighborhoods.

Excerpt:
 
Home of the bearded and the buff, Denver's aspen-tinged allure has never been greater. The secret is out: ample sunshine, a brewery on every corner and an endless supply of adrenaline-firing fun are fuelling the Rocky Mountain rush. And those lofty alpine summits aren't the only highs in town -- revamped Union Station is at the heart of new developments like the Ski Train, which in 2017 will whisk skiers direct from downtown to Winter Park's powdery bliss. Throw a vibrant economy into the mix, and you get artsy districts like RiNo (River North) and LoHi (Lower Highlands), where you can replenish your calories in slow-food market halls, bookended by gallery hopping and a night out with some rootsy, denim-clad rockers.

Read the rest here.

Zagat tabs Denver as no. 3 food city in U.S.

Only Washington, D.C., and Los Angeles topped Denver on the 25-city list.

Excerpt:

The best city for singles. For millennials. For entrepreneurs. For outdoorspeople. Over the past few years, Denver has ranked at or near the top of virtually every U.S. index there is; it was only a matter of time before outsiders "discovered" its dynamic dining scene too. This year alone, Nobu MatsuhisaGregory GourdetDeborah Schneider and Hugh Acheson staked claims here; Jeffrey Wall of Atlanta's Kimball House is on his way, and so is the team behind New York's Death & Co.

Meanwhile, there's no stopping our homegrown talent. Beard award-winners Bobby Stuckey and Lachlan Mackinnon-Patterson (Frasca) will be opening Tavernetta soon; fellow recipient Jennifer Jasinski (Rioja et al.) is expanding her mini empire with Ultreia. 

Read the rest here.

Chicago Tribune explores Denver food markets

The story looked at The Source, Avanti, Union Station and Central Market, as well as Aurora's Stanley Marketplace.

Excerpt:

Ask anyone who has lived for at least a few years in this gateway to the Rocky Mountains, and they'll say Denver has changed.

It's younger and edgier, and it bubbles with an energy wholly absent when the city was "nothing but a big ol' cow town in the early '80s," as one local said. Like most places, the change is principally seen in rising home prices (bad!) and a blossoming food and drink scene (good!).
 
But the food and drink explosion has come in one particularly broad and curious form: the food market.

Read the rest here.
170 LoDo Articles | Page: | Show All
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