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38 Five Points Articles | Page: | Show All

L.A. Times catches up with Denver's Laundry Truck

The Los Angeles Times spotlighted Denver's Laundry Truck in a feature that called the aid to homelss people "simple and innovative."

An excerpt:

“You need 13,000 watts running through the truck to make it work,” said Tim Reinen, executive director of Radian Inc., a nonprofit design group that worked with Bayaud on the truck. “Then you have six dryers operating simultaneously at 120 degrees heated by propane.”

And an 800-pound generator mounted underneath.

After several redesigns and $90,000 in donations, the truck hit the streets in April. Denver Water, a city utility, lets it hook up to fire hydrants for water and provides a meter to measure how much it uses. Since then the truck has washed 660 loads, or about 10,000 pounds of laundry."

Read the full story here.
 

ULC's Tony Pickett offers housing lessons to Oregon's Metro

Tony Pickett of Denver's Urban Land Conservancy recently spoke about affordability and equity in Portland.

Excerpt:

The Urban Land Conservancy, where Pickett has worked since 2013, has even more opportunity to create affordability in the Mile-High City. Started with a $15 million seed fund, the organization has grown over time to invest $70 million in 28 projects, generating over $400 million in redevelopment.

One of the conservancy's advantages has been the ability to move quickly to purchase prime sites as Denver undergoes a multi-billion dollar expansion of its rail transit system.

Pickett shared the example of the conservancy's Park Hill Village West development, on Denver's new A-Line commuter rail connecting downtown to Denver International Airport. Urban Land Conservancy purchased the site close to a planned station in a historically black neighborhood to create permanently affordable housing with easy access to the region's growing transit network. The development opened at about the same time as the rail line.

Read the rest here.

AP story delves into the history and present of Five Points, Denver's "Harlem of the West"

The Associated Press story looked at the rich legacy of jazz, African-American history and the neighborhood's modern-day boom.

Excerpt:
 
Denver's Five Points isn't the only historically black enclave changed by population shifts and revitalization. In New York, neighborhoods like Harlem and Brooklyn's Fort Greene have lost black residents as rents have risen. Seminal black-owned landmarks, like Harlem's Lenox Lounge, have shuttered. Activists in Houston's Freeman's Town have worked to prevent brick streets laid by former slaves from being uprooted despite development pressures.

On the other hand, some of Five Points' new businesses are opening in storefronts that have long sat empty, and they're making an effort to recognize the neighborhood's roots.

The 715 Club, founded by the son of a Pullman porter at the corner of Welton and 26th, had been closed for years before a 2016 reopening. "We are a neighborhood bar in the heart of 5 Points trying to preserve a piece of Welton history," the new owners say on their Facebook page.

Read the rest here.

NY Times gauges $1.9M worth of housing in Denver

The story compared properties in Denver, Santa Barbara, California, and Wayne, Pennsylvania. 

Excerpt:

DENVER

WHAT A condominium with three bedrooms and five bathrooms in a converted church

HOW MUCH $1,850,000

SIZE 4,815 square feet

PRICE PER SQUARE FOOT $384

SETTING This condominium is in a former Presbyterian church in the San Rafael historic district, about 10 blocks outside downtown Denver. With the exception of some commercial and small apartment buildings, the neighborhood is single-family, dominated by red brick houses, many of them Queen Anne-style. Shopping and dining are a few blocks away, toward downtown.

INDOORS The church was built in 1906 and converted to a residence between 2012 and 2014. It was designed by A. Morris Stuckert, an architect who built several houses in the district, though is probably best known for the Kittredge building, an imposing granite office downtown.

Read the rest here.

Mayor Hancock gives Denver travel tips to U.S. News & World Report

His picks included LoDo, the Denver Art Museum and Red Rocks.

Excerpt:

Denver Mayor Michael Hancock has been a key force behind efforts to ramp up tourism in the Mile High City since being elected in 2011, working to expand direct flights to Denver International Airport and improve the airport's facilities. A longtime Denver resident now in his second term, Hancock has seen firsthand how much the city has grown and changed over the years. He says Denver has a special quality that makes the city unique.

"There’s a certain spirit in this city you don’t find everywhere," he tells U.S. News. "It’s a very optimistic, forward-thinking, positive spirit that permeates every sector and every individual."

. . .

Describe your perfect day in Denver.

My family and I would go have brunch at Snooze or one of the great diners in Denver, like the Denver Diner downtown. Then we would go walk the dogs in City Park. Then maybe we’d go to the Denver Zoo, which is well-respected around the country. The primates and the elephants are my favorite animal exhibits. At night, we’d have dinner, then we would go find somewhere to enjoy live music because Denver has more live music venues than Austin, Texas. I love listening to jazz at El Chapultepec and Jazz at Jacks. The Soiled Dove Underground in [the neighborhood of] Lowry has great sound and gets some national acts.

Read the rest here.

Zagat tabs Denver as no. 3 food city in U.S.

Only Washington, D.C., and Los Angeles topped Denver on the 25-city list.

Excerpt:

The best city for singles. For millennials. For entrepreneurs. For outdoorspeople. Over the past few years, Denver has ranked at or near the top of virtually every U.S. index there is; it was only a matter of time before outsiders "discovered" its dynamic dining scene too. This year alone, Nobu MatsuhisaGregory GourdetDeborah Schneider and Hugh Acheson staked claims here; Jeffrey Wall of Atlanta's Kimball House is on his way, and so is the team behind New York's Death & Co.

Meanwhile, there's no stopping our homegrown talent. Beard award-winners Bobby Stuckey and Lachlan Mackinnon-Patterson (Frasca) will be opening Tavernetta soon; fellow recipient Jennifer Jasinski (Rioja et al.) is expanding her mini empire with Ultreia. 

Read the rest here.

Men's Journal details "World's Best Brewery Crawl" in Denver

The route includes pints at Wynkoop, Great Divide and Spangalang.

Excerpt:

If you're a true fan of better beer, upgrade the suds-soaked adventure that is the bar crawl to a brewery crawl. At every stop you'll get to meet the men and women behind the pint in your hand, and those ales and lagers will never be fresher than when they're served a few feet from where they're brewed. Sadly, not many cities have the proper density of breweries to pull off a proper crawl, but among the lucky few, Denver reigns supreme.

In this three-mile stretch across downtown Denver, there are an astounding 18 breweries (including a cidery). Naturally, we don't recommend hitting every spot in one day. But with a little prudent sampling, you can hit the high notes in one long-distance stroll. Each leg of our crawl takes about a 15-minute walk to the next watering hole, though Uber is abundant across the city.

Read the rest here.

NY Times spotlights immigrant bus in Denver

New York Times story offered a personal look at Autobuses los Paisanos in downtown Denver, where buses ferry a largely immigrant clientele to El Paso and back.

Excerpt:

The $65 bus to Mexico rolled into a parking lot here recently, belching exhaust into the Colorado night as a river of people -- crying, kissing -- thrust belongings into the belly of the vehicle and climbed aboard.

Frank Torres, 64, a driver in black slacks, descended from his perch above it all.

"This is true drama," he said, surveying the scene. A boy wailed to his left. Travelers burdened by packages passed on his right. Mr. Torres, snacking on a coconut Popsicle, took a meaty bite. "Separation. You see a lot of that. The mother leaving her child. The child leaving the mother. This is how it goes."

Read the rest here.

WSJ showcases FasTracks

The Wall Street Journal reported on the successes and challenges of Denver's transit expansion.

Excerpt:

The system opened two new rail lines this year -- one to the city's airport and one to northern suburbs -- both operated under contract by private company Denver Transit Partners LLC. Two more lines are scheduled to open by the end of 2016.

Financially, RTD is "basically doing everything right," said Jeff Brown, who researches public-transit system finances and is chairman of Florida State University's Department of Urban and Regional Planning.

Still, in 2013 the RTD spent the most in capital costs per passenger ride among the nation's 15 largest transit agencies, due to the cost of its buildout. And it isn't immune from economic concerns.

Read the rest here.

Florida startup Cuttlesoft expands to Denver

Standout software developer and IT services firm Cuttlesoft picked Denver over Raleigh for its second office, reported the Tallahassee Democrat.

Excerpt:

Cuttlesoft's name is a mashup of cuttlefish, the startup's logo and inspiration as an adaptable animal, and software, the startup's bread and butter. In less than two years, Valcarcel and Morehouse have worked side by side building a tech-based company specializing in IT and software services, consulting, auditing and web applications for its growing list of clients.

. . .

Now they'e preparing to work in dual time zones as it opens a second office in lower downtown Denver. The company -- the Tallahassee Chamber of Commerce's 2016 Startup of the Year -- wanted to expand to a market with a robust tech presence. The finalists? Denver and Raleigh, North Carolina.

. . .

"We wouldn’t be there or growing and expanding our business in both places if we hadn’t gotten started here," Valcarcel said. "If we had moved to Silicon Valley … I don’t think we would have had the capital to break ground."

Read the rest here.

TimeOut calls Denver fifth-best city lo live in the U.S.

Denver ranked on the list high due to its parks, proximity to the Rockies, transit, music and beer -- plus legal marijuana.

Excerpt:

Denver is one of the fastest-growing cities in the nation, boasting 83,000 new residents since 2010. Educated millennials lead the charge, drawn to Denver's cool music scene, dozens of breweries, public transportation network -- including bike share -- and, in some cases, the legalization of marijuana in Colorado. 

Read the rest here.

Next City spotlights workforce development in Denver

Next City reported on the decentralization and expansion of workforce development by the Denver Office of Economic Development.

Excerpt:

Before this year, there weren't many spots in Denver where an unemployed person could get help stepping back into the job stream. A small cluster of employment service centers were huddled in the heart of the city, but most of its 11 districts were largely unserved.

Now that the Office of Economic Development (OED) has decided to divide Denver's job training programs out to private contractors, the number of government-funded work and economic assistance centers will jump seven-fold, going from seven to nearly 50 and spanning across all 11 districts instead of only five.

"People can access these services where they're comfortable instead of traveling [into downtown]," says Denise Bryant, director of the OED's workforce development program. "We have contractors and subcontractors that are now actually in the community."

Read the rest here.

HuffPost Black Voices video profiles Denver's DJ Cavem

DJ Cavem, a.k.a. Ietef Vita, and his pursuit of organic gardening and "kale life" were the focus of a recent video on Huffington Post Black Voices.

Watch the video here.

Milwaukee Mag drinks in Denver's beer scene

Milwaukee Magazine took a "barnstorming tour of the amazing beer city that is Denver."

Excerpt:

Denver is such an amazing beer city, and there are so many quality breweries to choose from that it can be overwhelming. Logistics and time prevented me from hitting a few places on my list, but I did manage a solid barnstorming tour. Here's the rundown (in order of appearance).

Black Shirt Brewing (3719 Walnut St.) resides on the edge of the up-and-coming RiNo (River North Art District). It's an outpost conveniently located one block from a light rail stop (that I took from the airport). Red ales are the specialty and they're pretty tasty, as is the Blood Orange Double IPA. The dark taproom is welcoming and has a rock vibe—Fugazi was playing as I walked in. It was a great start to the weekend.

I hiked a mile from Black Shirt to Spangalang Brewery (2736 Welton St.), which resides in a former DMV office in the Five Points area -- the name pays homage to the jazz heritage in the neighborhood. Co-founder Taylor Rees was the head brewer at Great Divide before opening Spangalang last spring. The spot offers a range of well-crafted styles. My favorites were the Lil' Confused Dry Hopped Wheat Beer, a crisp summer brew made with Hefeweizen yeast. The big, juicy fruit flavor of the D-Train IPA was also perfect.

Read the rest here.

Nashville looks to Denver for lessons on funding transit

A Nashville Public Radio story reported on Denver's lessons for funding a transit expansion.

Excerpt:

For example, in Denver in the late 1990s, voters rejected a plan. Later, they approved a sales tax for light rail. That was only after advocates spoke to tens of thousands of residents, and found pockets of support among young professionals and, surprisingly, retirees.

"One of the biggest pockets of support were retired women over the age of 65, because they saw it as the first opportunity for them to come back into downtown and see a show at the performing arts center and have lunch together with the girls," said Kathleen Osher with Denver's Transit Alliance.

Read the rest here.
38 Five Points Articles | Page: | Show All
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