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Men's Journal details "World's Best Brewery Crawl" in Denver

The route includes pints at Wynkoop, Great Divide and Spangalang.

Excerpt:

If you're a true fan of better beer, upgrade the suds-soaked adventure that is the bar crawl to a brewery crawl. At every stop you'll get to meet the men and women behind the pint in your hand, and those ales and lagers will never be fresher than when they're served a few feet from where they're brewed. Sadly, not many cities have the proper density of breweries to pull off a proper crawl, but among the lucky few, Denver reigns supreme.

In this three-mile stretch across downtown Denver, there are an astounding 18 breweries (including a cidery). Naturally, we don't recommend hitting every spot in one day. But with a little prudent sampling, you can hit the high notes in one long-distance stroll. Each leg of our crawl takes about a 15-minute walk to the next watering hole, though Uber is abundant across the city.

Read the rest here.

WSJ showcases FasTracks

The Wall Street Journal reported on the successes and challenges of Denver's transit expansion.

Excerpt:

The system opened two new rail lines this year -- one to the city's airport and one to northern suburbs -- both operated under contract by private company Denver Transit Partners LLC. Two more lines are scheduled to open by the end of 2016.

Financially, RTD is "basically doing everything right," said Jeff Brown, who researches public-transit system finances and is chairman of Florida State University's Department of Urban and Regional Planning.

Still, in 2013 the RTD spent the most in capital costs per passenger ride among the nation's 15 largest transit agencies, due to the cost of its buildout. And it isn't immune from economic concerns.

Read the rest here.

TimeOut calls Denver fifth-best city lo live in the U.S.

Denver ranked on the list high due to its parks, proximity to the Rockies, transit, music and beer -- plus legal marijuana.

Excerpt:

Denver is one of the fastest-growing cities in the nation, boasting 83,000 new residents since 2010. Educated millennials lead the charge, drawn to Denver's cool music scene, dozens of breweries, public transportation network -- including bike share -- and, in some cases, the legalization of marijuana in Colorado. 

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Nashville looks to Denver for lessons on funding transit

A Nashville Public Radio story reported on Denver's lessons for funding a transit expansion.

Excerpt:

For example, in Denver in the late 1990s, voters rejected a plan. Later, they approved a sales tax for light rail. That was only after advocates spoke to tens of thousands of residents, and found pockets of support among young professionals and, surprisingly, retirees.

"One of the biggest pockets of support were retired women over the age of 65, because they saw it as the first opportunity for them to come back into downtown and see a show at the performing arts center and have lunch together with the girls," said Kathleen Osher with Denver's Transit Alliance.

Read the rest here.

Politico Magazine takes stock of FasTracks in Denver

Politico Magazine took a deep dive into the expansion of Denver's rail network.

Excerpt:

A decade ago, travelers arriving at Denver's sprawling new airport would look out over a vast expanse of flat, prairie dog-infested grassland and wonder if their plane had somehow fallen short of its destination. The $4.9 billion airport -- at 53 square miles, larger than Manhattan -- was derided as being "halfway to Kansas," and given the emptiness of the 23-mile drive to the city, it felt that way.

Last month, arriving visitors boarded the first trains headed for downtown, a journey that zips past a new Japanese-style "smart city" emerging from the prairie before depositing passengers 37 minutes later in a bustling urban hive of restaurants, shops and residential towers that only six years ago was a gravelly no man's land -- an entire $2 billion downtown neighborhood that's mushroomed up around the hub of Denver's rapidly expanding light rail system.

The 22.8-mile spur from the airport to downtown is the latest addition to a regional rail system that has transformed Denver and its suburbs. Using an unprecedented public-private partnership that combines private funding, local tax dollars and federal grants, Denver has done something no other major metro area has accomplished in the past decade, though a number of cities have tried. At a moment when aging mass transit systems in several major cities are capturing headlines for mismanagement, chronic delays and even deaths, Denver is unveiling a shiny new and widely praised network: 68 stations along 10 different spurs, covering 98 miles, with another 15 miles still to come. Even before the new lines opened, 77,000 people were riding light rail each day, making it the eighth-largest system in the country even though Denver is not in the top 20 cities for population. The effects on the region's quality of life have been measurable and also surprising, even to the project's most committed advocates. Originally intended to unclog congested highways and defeat a stubborn brown smog that was as unhealthy as it was ugly, the new rail system has proven that its greatest value is the remarkable changes in land use its stations have prompted, from revitalizing moribund neighborhoods, like the area around Union Station, to creating new communities where once there was only sprawl or buffalo grass.

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Charlotte Observer calls Denver "the future of transit"

The Charlotte Observer ran a story focused on regional collaboration that painted Denver as a transit model for other cities.

Excerpt:

The Denver area has a long history of regionalism, in part due to necessity: The region makes up a majority of the state's population and tax receipts, so there's no other game in town, so to speak. The transit system has been run by a regional entity that covers multiple counties since its inception.

But that doesn't mean cooperation has always come easily. In 1997, the first attempt at a ballot measure for a regional sales tax increase to pay for an expanded system went down 57 to 43 percent.

"People say, did you all wake up one morning and decide to cooperate? We didn't," said Maria Garcia Berry of CRL Associates, a public policy firm that helped craft the successful 2004 ballot campaign.

Read the rest here.

Technical.ly debuts video on Denver's tech scene

Technical.ly, a network of websites covering technology in a number of cities on the East Coast, released a video on Denver's tech scene made when it kicked off the Tomorrow Tour at The Commons on Champa in Feb. 2016.

Participants stressed that the city's uncommonly collaborative nature has helped catalyze an especially fertile startup community.


Video:




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Metro State partnering with Detroit music school

The Detroit Free Press reported that Metropolitan State University of Denver is opening a campus at  the Detroit Institute of Music Education (DIME).

Excerpt:

MSU Denver administrators visited DIME last year for the first time, "and it was love at first sight," said Kreidler, who said he was particularly impressed by the faculty: "highly credentialed, extremely intelligent and good at what they do."

The new deal is part of a bigger growth strategy for Nixon and Clayman: A Denver campus is expected to open in fall 2017, next in what they hope will be several DIME-branded schools across the country. And there are plans to double the space at the Detroit facility, which now occupies three floors of a Dan Gilbert-owned building.

"It's our dream to have this place full and buzzing with young students," said Clayman.

Read the rest here.

Econsult Solutions blogs on Denver transit transformation

Econsult Solutions President Richard Voith blogged about Denver's transit-oriented transformation.

Excerpt:

In 1990, The City of Denver had 468,139 people, and 237,926 jobs. Downtown Denver was a sleepy place largely devoid of people in the evening. Only a handful of people lived downtown back then.
 
The area surrounding the downtown was, like many cities, home to low and moderate income residents while growth was concentrated in the suburban towns surrounding Denver: the eastern suburb of Aurora became the third largest city and the western suburb of Lakewood became the fourth largest. The Denver metropolitan area was a decidedly auto-oriented place; there was no rail transit in Denver and its once proud Union Station was in disrepair, seeing only one long-distance train each way per day.
 
But Denver created a vision; note the active tense. Local leaders sought to make the Denver metropolitan area into something great. They decided to build a new airport and a new transit system. In the early 1990s, Denver took its first steps towards establishing a light rail transit system in the region, and in 1994 the Central Corridor, a light rail line through Denver's Five Points district, opened without the aid of tax increases or federal funds. The same year, the Regional Transportation District (RTD) received permission from the Federal Transit Administration (FTA) to begin preliminary engineering and environmental impact statement for the Southwest Light Rail Project. In 1996, the FTA awarded $120 million which was augmented by $18 milling in Highway "flex" funds for the new light rail line. Construction began in 1997 and the line opened in July of 2000. Denver never looked back.

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Denver seen as transit model for Miami

A letter to the editor of the Miami Herald said Denver's transit system offers a target for the Florida city.

Excerpt:

How did Denver do it?

Experts conducted research, united behind well-defined goals, engaged the best partners and won public confidence by presenting achievable plans. They prioritized based on the best available data rather than political interests, selected the best partners through fair, transparent processes and negotiated agreements focused on best value and not only lowest cost. They did this in record time and now have one of America's most livable big cities.

Miami is no less deserving or able. Let's not waste another minute.

Read the rest here.

U.S. News & World Report showcases Metro State's aerospace initiative

U.S. News & World Report covered Metro State's aerospace manufacturing program.

Excerpt:

Within the Metropolitan State University of Denver's campus is a hidden gem -- a developing program that intends to marry advanced manufacturing with aerospace and engineering fields.

"It's a diamond in the rough," says student Taletha Maricle-Fitzpatrick, who's graduating this year with a degree in aerospace physics. "There aren't very many aerospace people and even fewer aerospace physics majors. I found that because of that I received a lot more support."

The goal of the program, dubbed the Aerospace and Engineering Science initiative, is to draw in students from different disciplines to fill a need for homegrown talent in the local aerospace industry, a problem known within the state as the "Colorado Paradox."

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Entrepreneur covers Denver-based Evolve Vacation Rental Network in story on sharing economy services

Entrepreneur talked to Brian Egan at Denver-based Evolve Vacation Rental Network for a story about services for the sharing economy.

Excerpt:

"The best marketplace is only as good as its suppliers," says Evolve co-founder Brian Egan of his company’s position in the sharing-economy ecosystem. "Marketplaces in our space are established; now we just need more suppliers to fill them out."

Read the rest here.

2014 Denver Startup Week breaks records, 2015 dates announced

The 2014 Denver Startup Week drew nearly 8,000 participants to 180 events. The 2015 edition is scheduled for Sept. 28-Oct. 2.

Excerpt:

Denver Startup Week came to a close September 19, 2014 after five action-packed days where expectations were exceeded for the third straight year and the highest level of participation was achieved. Over 7,800 startup community members engaged in over 180 events celebrating everything entrepreneurial in the Mile High City. With over 700 companies involved in events, seminars and panels over a period of five days, this year’s event saw even more energy, community engagement, enthusiasm and collaboration.

Dubbed the largest free entrepreneurial event of its kind in the entire country, Denver Startup Week 2015 plans are already underway with the event scheduled to take place September 28 – October 2, 2015.

As Denver Mayor Michael B. Hancock stated at the Kickoff Breakfast, "Denver has quickly become the 'Startup Capital of the World.' Places like Galvanize, Industry and others have really created this space, along with all of you, and that says Denver is simply the place to be. If you are entrepreneurial, if you are innovative, we want you to bring your humble and creative energies to our great city."

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Billboard calls CU Denver top school for music industry

Billboard named CU Denver's music business program one of the best in the U.S.

Excerpt:

The University of Colorado Denver (Denver, CO)

The university features a music and entertainment industry studies department that includes courses in concert promotion, music publishing and music business in the digital age, as well as a student-run label, CAM Records. The school offers one of the few singer-songwriter programs in the country.  Students collaborate across all programs, creating a real-world experience of the music industry while in school, and building a supportive community of musicians, managers, and engineers.

CU Denver communication program director Cynthia Barringer notes some of the concerns within the music business education community including: the absence of music education in K to 12th grade schools, the need to increase musical literacy, the cost of music technology, and the importance of offering more courses in aspects of the music business including business, law, finance and economics.

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CU Denver study links city design and health

Research at CU Denver indicated that older, more compact cities with lots of intersections were healthier than newer communities.


Excerpt:

The researchers examined street network density, connectivity and configuration. Then they asked how these measures of street design impacted rates of obesity, diabetes, high blood pressure, heart disease and asthma. The study used data collected by the California Health Interview Survey for the years 2003, 2005, 2007 and 2009, sampling between 42,000 and 51,000 adults.

The results showed that increased intersection density was significantly linked to reduction in obesity at the neighborhood level and of obesity, diabetes, high blood pressure, and heart disease at the city level. The more intersections, the lower the disease rates.

The study also found a correlation between wider streets with more lanes and increased obesity and diabetes rates. The reason, the researchers said, was that wider streets may be indicative of an inferior pedestrian environment.  The presence of a 'big box' store also tends to be indicative of poor walkability in a neighborhood and was associated with a 13.7 percent rise in obesity rates and a 24.9 percent increase in diabetes rates.

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