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Must read: The Nation magazine sheds a suspicious light on the Interstate 70 upgrade plan

The Nation presents a dark take on how the government's plan to bury sections of Interstate 70 in Denver could destroy the character of historic neighbohoods. In short, residents lose and real estate investors win.

"The CDOT’s plan would condemn 56 homes and 17 businesses—a more extensive use of eminent domain than was required for the construction of the highway in the first place. It would also sever the neighborhoods during the decade of construction and open them to land-grabbing by developers."

The plan, the story contends, is an update of redlining because it would make many homeowners ineligible for FHA mortgages. 

"It already appears to be working. In addition to direct displacement by eminent domain, home values in GES have increased by 68 percent in the last two years (compared to 30 percent in the rest of Denver). This has displaced the neighborhoods’ renters, who are uniquely precarious—over 50 percent have no lease at all—as well as longtime homeowners who cannot afford the increased property taxes. The stormwater component of the plan also places Globeville back into the 100-year floodplain, making homeowners ineligible for FHA loans. The redlining returns."

Read author Caroline Tracey's full report here.
 

Cooking Channel chows at Biker Jim's

The segment sampled some of the more exotic hot dogs at Denver's one and only Biker Jim's.

Excerpt:

"Biker Jim's is a place in a class of its own," says restaurateur Bradley Rubin. "What this guy's doing with sausages, nobody else is doing, I'm telling you. Nobody's coming close."

Watch it here.

Mayor Hancock gives Denver travel tips to U.S. News & World Report

His picks included LoDo, the Denver Art Museum and Red Rocks.

Excerpt:

Denver Mayor Michael Hancock has been a key force behind efforts to ramp up tourism in the Mile High City since being elected in 2011, working to expand direct flights to Denver International Airport and improve the airport's facilities. A longtime Denver resident now in his second term, Hancock has seen firsthand how much the city has grown and changed over the years. He says Denver has a special quality that makes the city unique.

"There’s a certain spirit in this city you don’t find everywhere," he tells U.S. News. "It’s a very optimistic, forward-thinking, positive spirit that permeates every sector and every individual."

. . .

Describe your perfect day in Denver.

My family and I would go have brunch at Snooze or one of the great diners in Denver, like the Denver Diner downtown. Then we would go walk the dogs in City Park. Then maybe we’d go to the Denver Zoo, which is well-respected around the country. The primates and the elephants are my favorite animal exhibits. At night, we’d have dinner, then we would go find somewhere to enjoy live music because Denver has more live music venues than Austin, Texas. I love listening to jazz at El Chapultepec and Jazz at Jacks. The Soiled Dove Underground in [the neighborhood of] Lowry has great sound and gets some national acts.

Read the rest here.

High Times picks its favorite munchies in Denver

The cannabis-friendly magazine chose 10 of its favorite post-smoke eateries in the city.

Excerpt:

Since legalization of cannabis in Denver, Colorado, the urban landscape has experienced a surge of marijuana enthusiasts and medical refugees alike looking to make a home in the Mile High City. Abandoned properties once stuck motionless in a state of decay have been revived by grow operations and newly legal businesses. What was once derelict has been brought back to life, breathing energy into the city streets.
 
Taking part in a cultural revolution can cause one to work up an appetite, so as one of those marijuana enthusiasts new to Denver, you might be asking yourself, "Where are the best places to eat while stoned?"

Well, we're here to help you find the best munchie fixes in the city with expert recommendations from a top cannabis chef, complete with pairing tips for primo pot strains  -- so get ready to blaze before stepping foot into one of these fine establishments!

Read the rest here.

NY Times spotlights immigrant bus in Denver

New York Times story offered a personal look at Autobuses los Paisanos in downtown Denver, where buses ferry a largely immigrant clientele to El Paso and back.

Excerpt:

The $65 bus to Mexico rolled into a parking lot here recently, belching exhaust into the Colorado night as a river of people -- crying, kissing -- thrust belongings into the belly of the vehicle and climbed aboard.

Frank Torres, 64, a driver in black slacks, descended from his perch above it all.

"This is true drama," he said, surveying the scene. A boy wailed to his left. Travelers burdened by packages passed on his right. Mr. Torres, snacking on a coconut Popsicle, took a meaty bite. "Separation. You see a lot of that. The mother leaving her child. The child leaving the mother. This is how it goes."

Read the rest here.

WSJ showcases FasTracks

The Wall Street Journal reported on the successes and challenges of Denver's transit expansion.

Excerpt:

The system opened two new rail lines this year -- one to the city's airport and one to northern suburbs -- both operated under contract by private company Denver Transit Partners LLC. Two more lines are scheduled to open by the end of 2016.

Financially, RTD is "basically doing everything right," said Jeff Brown, who researches public-transit system finances and is chairman of Florida State University's Department of Urban and Regional Planning.

Still, in 2013 the RTD spent the most in capital costs per passenger ride among the nation's 15 largest transit agencies, due to the cost of its buildout. And it isn't immune from economic concerns.

Read the rest here.

TimeOut calls Denver fifth-best city lo live in the U.S.

Denver ranked on the list high due to its parks, proximity to the Rockies, transit, music and beer -- plus legal marijuana.

Excerpt:

Denver is one of the fastest-growing cities in the nation, boasting 83,000 new residents since 2010. Educated millennials lead the charge, drawn to Denver's cool music scene, dozens of breweries, public transportation network -- including bike share -- and, in some cases, the legalization of marijuana in Colorado. 

Read the rest here.

Next City spotlights workforce development in Denver

Next City reported on the decentralization and expansion of workforce development by the Denver Office of Economic Development.

Excerpt:

Before this year, there weren't many spots in Denver where an unemployed person could get help stepping back into the job stream. A small cluster of employment service centers were huddled in the heart of the city, but most of its 11 districts were largely unserved.

Now that the Office of Economic Development (OED) has decided to divide Denver's job training programs out to private contractors, the number of government-funded work and economic assistance centers will jump seven-fold, going from seven to nearly 50 and spanning across all 11 districts instead of only five.

"People can access these services where they're comfortable instead of traveling [into downtown]," says Denise Bryant, director of the OED's workforce development program. "We have contractors and subcontractors that are now actually in the community."

Read the rest here.

Milwaukee Mag drinks in Denver's beer scene

Milwaukee Magazine took a "barnstorming tour of the amazing beer city that is Denver."

Excerpt:

Denver is such an amazing beer city, and there are so many quality breweries to choose from that it can be overwhelming. Logistics and time prevented me from hitting a few places on my list, but I did manage a solid barnstorming tour. Here's the rundown (in order of appearance).

Black Shirt Brewing (3719 Walnut St.) resides on the edge of the up-and-coming RiNo (River North Art District). It's an outpost conveniently located one block from a light rail stop (that I took from the airport). Red ales are the specialty and they're pretty tasty, as is the Blood Orange Double IPA. The dark taproom is welcoming and has a rock vibe—Fugazi was playing as I walked in. It was a great start to the weekend.

I hiked a mile from Black Shirt to Spangalang Brewery (2736 Welton St.), which resides in a former DMV office in the Five Points area -- the name pays homage to the jazz heritage in the neighborhood. Co-founder Taylor Rees was the head brewer at Great Divide before opening Spangalang last spring. The spot offers a range of well-crafted styles. My favorites were the Lil' Confused Dry Hopped Wheat Beer, a crisp summer brew made with Hefeweizen yeast. The big, juicy fruit flavor of the D-Train IPA was also perfect.

Read the rest here.

Nashville looks to Denver for lessons on funding transit

A Nashville Public Radio story reported on Denver's lessons for funding a transit expansion.

Excerpt:

For example, in Denver in the late 1990s, voters rejected a plan. Later, they approved a sales tax for light rail. That was only after advocates spoke to tens of thousands of residents, and found pockets of support among young professionals and, surprisingly, retirees.

"One of the biggest pockets of support were retired women over the age of 65, because they saw it as the first opportunity for them to come back into downtown and see a show at the performing arts center and have lunch together with the girls," said Kathleen Osher with Denver's Transit Alliance.

Read the rest here.

Esquire puts two Denver bars on its "18 Best Bars in America" list

A pair of Denver watering holes made "Esquire's 18 Best Bars in America" list: Occidental and Shelby's.

Excerpt:

Shelby's Bar & Grill

Where it is: 519 Eighteenth Street, Denver, Colorado

Why you're here: Because you'll stand in the little smokers' corral in front of Shelby's and you'll look around -- all the way around -- and you'll remember that Denver used to be an ornery frontier town, full of crust and character. And then you'll step back inside and call for another round, and the bartender will tell you to shut up and wait your damn turn like a human being.

What you're having: Jameson.

Read the rest here.
 

Politico Magazine takes stock of FasTracks in Denver

Politico Magazine took a deep dive into the expansion of Denver's rail network.

Excerpt:

A decade ago, travelers arriving at Denver's sprawling new airport would look out over a vast expanse of flat, prairie dog-infested grassland and wonder if their plane had somehow fallen short of its destination. The $4.9 billion airport -- at 53 square miles, larger than Manhattan -- was derided as being "halfway to Kansas," and given the emptiness of the 23-mile drive to the city, it felt that way.

Last month, arriving visitors boarded the first trains headed for downtown, a journey that zips past a new Japanese-style "smart city" emerging from the prairie before depositing passengers 37 minutes later in a bustling urban hive of restaurants, shops and residential towers that only six years ago was a gravelly no man's land -- an entire $2 billion downtown neighborhood that's mushroomed up around the hub of Denver's rapidly expanding light rail system.

The 22.8-mile spur from the airport to downtown is the latest addition to a regional rail system that has transformed Denver and its suburbs. Using an unprecedented public-private partnership that combines private funding, local tax dollars and federal grants, Denver has done something no other major metro area has accomplished in the past decade, though a number of cities have tried. At a moment when aging mass transit systems in several major cities are capturing headlines for mismanagement, chronic delays and even deaths, Denver is unveiling a shiny new and widely praised network: 68 stations along 10 different spurs, covering 98 miles, with another 15 miles still to come. Even before the new lines opened, 77,000 people were riding light rail each day, making it the eighth-largest system in the country even though Denver is not in the top 20 cities for population. The effects on the region's quality of life have been measurable and also surprising, even to the project's most committed advocates. Originally intended to unclog congested highways and defeat a stubborn brown smog that was as unhealthy as it was ugly, the new rail system has proven that its greatest value is the remarkable changes in land use its stations have prompted, from revitalizing moribund neighborhoods, like the area around Union Station, to creating new communities where once there was only sprawl or buffalo grass.

Read the rest here.

Charlotte Observer calls Denver "the future of transit"

The Charlotte Observer ran a story focused on regional collaboration that painted Denver as a transit model for other cities.

Excerpt:

The Denver area has a long history of regionalism, in part due to necessity: The region makes up a majority of the state's population and tax receipts, so there's no other game in town, so to speak. The transit system has been run by a regional entity that covers multiple counties since its inception.

But that doesn't mean cooperation has always come easily. In 1997, the first attempt at a ballot measure for a regional sales tax increase to pay for an expanded system went down 57 to 43 percent.

"People say, did you all wake up one morning and decide to cooperate? We didn't," said Maria Garcia Berry of CRL Associates, a public policy firm that helped craft the successful 2004 ballot campaign.

Read the rest here.

Forbes picks five reasons to visit Denver now

Forbes ran a story on "5 Reasons You Should Plan a Trip to Denver Right Now."

Excerpt:

A Hot New Hub

The new Union Station debuted in July 2014 as one of the trendiest spots for restaurants, bars, shops and a hotel. While this operational train station has been open since 1881, it underwent a massive transformation as part of an effort to revitalize the declining area.

It will become even more of a can’t-miss spot in the energetic LoDo (Lower Downtown) district when a new 22.8-mile commuter rail between the station and Denver International Airport starts service on April 22. The 30-minute ride into the city will remedy the city’s lack of public transportation options from the airport to its downtown core and the station will act as a hub for all travelers.

Read the rest here.

Four Denver restaurants make OpenTable's "100 Hottest Restaurants" list

Four Denver restaurants -- Acorn, Izakaya Den, Ophelia's Electric Soapbox and Linger -- made the cut for OpenTable's "100 Hottest Restaurants in America 2016" list.

Excerpt:

When looking for a place to dine out, why not snag a spot at the hottest place in town? The #OpenTable100 Hottest Restaurant in America list highlights hip, new restaurants, hot spots, celebrity chefs and avant-garde restaurateurs. We determined the list of honorees after analyzing more than five million reviews of more than 20,000 restaurants across the country -- all submitted by verified diners.

Read the rest here.
41 Arapahoe Square Articles | Page: | Show All
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