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Rail~Volution conference will showcase Denver's transportation advances

Rail~Volution is coming to Denver Sept. 17-20.

The conference, hosted by the Regional Transportation District (RTD) and local partners, focuses on building livable communities through transit and multimodal investments. National leaders, planners and advocates will examine and discuss all that the Denver region has accomplished since it last served as the host city for the gathering 17 years ago.

During 25 mobile workshops and more than 75 sessions over four days, leaders and practitioners from the fields of government, transit, real estate, business, finance, environment and advocacy will explore pertinent transit issues, opportunities and challenges common to the Rocky Mountain West.

“Denver has an extraordinary story to tell about how transit investments and cross-sector collaboration have changed the economic trajectory of the regions,” says Dan Bartholomay, CEO of Rail~Volution. “The Denver community found the right mix of investments that lead to truly livable places — places that take care to ensure affordability and access to jobs, good homes and healthy lifestyles. The Denver region’s integrated approach is exactly what other cities and regions are hoping to learn about at Rail~Volution.”

Featured speakers include Colorado Gov. John Hickenlooper; Denver Mayor Michael Hancock; Peter Rogoff, CEO of Sound Transit in Seattle; Phil Washington, CEO of L.A. Metro; Oregon Congressman Earl Blumenauer; Maurice Jones, president of Local Initiatives Support Corp. in New York; Christine Marquez-Hudson, president and CEO of The Denver Foundation; and John Martin, president and CEO of the Southeastern Institute of Research Inc. in Richmond, Va.

ParkiFi partners with Parkmobile, hoping to lure new customers with combined services.

As anyone who works or visits downtown Denver knows, parking is a pain. Now, Denver-based ParkiFi is making it easier to park by adding new features to its smartphone app. Previously, it could only show users where parking was available—but now users can pay for parking from the app. To help raise awareness ParkiFi is giving away a year of free parking in downtown.

“We’ve seen a lot of enthusiasm around our real-time parking spot finder app since we launched in November, but we think users are really going to get excited about the payment capability,” says Ryan Sullivan, CEO and co-founder of ParkiFi.

The new capabilities are thanks to a partnership with Parkmobile, which allows transactions via smartphone. While ParkiFi was launched in Denver, it could prove a valuable service in any metro area in the US.

“Our goal is to make parking as easy as possible for Colorado drivers, everything from finding a spot to payment” Sullivan explains. “They can focus on getting to where they need to be downtown without worrying about where to park and how to pay, saving even more time and eliminating the headache of forgetting to pay for parking or potentially getting a ticket.”

ParkiFi is valuing the year of parking at up to $2,000. The company explains that people can enter the contest by downloading ParkiFi and using it to find and pay for parking at downtown properties where they can use ParkiFi between now and July 31. Each time a person uses ParkiFi, they’re entered into the contest. After that it will select a winner at random and work with them to find the best place for them to park for the year or reward the winner with a $150 a month credit to their ParkiFi account.

Currently ParkiFi is only available in downtown Denver, but the company plans to expand its capabilities into other Denver neighborhoods soon. "ParkiFi’s parking sensors are being used by parking operators and municipalities at 24 locations in 11 states and 13 markets to obtain valuable analytics on parking patterns including occupancy, turnover and more," says Abby Hagstrom, a spokesperson for ParkiFi. "ParkiFi is also excited to announce a new partner, Parking Revenue Recovery Services, which will increase ParkiFi's coverage in Denver by over 2,000 spaces."

CDOT's $500K RoadX challenge open through February

The Colorado Department of Transportation (CDOT) launched the RoadX Bicycle and Pedestrian Challenge in 2016 to develop better systems to help those on foot and bicycles travel more safely. The RoadX challenge is open to proposals through Feb. 27. 

The challenge is made through a partnership with the Colorado Innovation Network's Imagine Colorado. The department said it is the nation's first statewide open innovation challenge platform to generate new ideas. In this case, the platform is taking on the issue of pedestrian and cyclist safety. 

Department officials hold that technological solutions to pedestrian and cycling safety can save lives. Studies have found that pedestrian crashes represent 10 percent of all fatalities and 7 percent serious injuries in Colorado. Bicycle crashes represent another 2 percent of all fatalities and 4 percent of all serious injuries in Colorado. 

The department will award $50,000 to the best ideas to help put them into action and the rest of the funds will support bringing concepts into reality, according to advocacy organization Bicycle Colorado. It will divide the awards into two tracks, the "Idea-thon" and the "Do-athon."

Under the first track up to five winners will each receive $10,000 for submitting a groundbreaking technological idea to improve bicycling and pedestrian safety. Under the second track, innovators can submit a unique and implementable idea that they must deploy within eight months of being selected as a finalist on March 31, 2017.

CDOT will select up to five finalists to build a proof of concept and will support each with $75,000 to help them launch the pilot. Of those, the one that implements the best program in the time period will receive $150,000 to continue it. The runner-up will receive $50,000 and the third runner-up will receive $25,000 to further develop their safety deployments. 

Contact Confluence Denver Innovation & Jobs News Editor Chris Meehan with tips and leads for future stories at chris@confluence-denver.com.

Donate and upgrade baggage with eBags and Goodwill

For the first time, eBags has partnered with Goodwill and Give Back Box to offer a Trade In, Trade Up Program. Through the program, Goodwill and Give Back Box will find a new home for a gently used backpack, business case, handbag or duffel that they no longer need and customers get a 25 percent discount coupon and a free eBags Connected Luggage Tag.

The Give Back Box program reuses boxes for shipping. As such the program helps keep both used travel gear and shipping materials out of landfills.

It doesn't matter where luggage or travel item was purchased, according to Krista Paul, vice president of business development and partnerships at eBags. She adds, "The program is available across the US eBags customers need only download a pre-paid shipping label and either drop off or organize a pick-up from UPS or USPS." 

To help automate the program, eBags partnered with the organizations. The shipping is done courtesy of Give Back Box and is shipped to the nearest Goodwill location, according to Paul. 

The Greenwood Village-based company also recently expanded its product lines by 41 percent, including 11 new private-label products and the Connected Luggage Tag, an ID tag that uses an app to track lost luggage.

The expansion, holiday season and Trade In, Trade Up Program are driving new employment at the company. "In anticipation of extra business from the holiday traffic coupled with new sales from the incentives granted to customers who utilize the Trade In, Trade Up Program, we have added approximately 20 to 25 new customer service agents," Paul says.

Contact Confluence Denver Innovation & Jobs News Editor Chris Meehan with tips and leads for future stories at chris@confluence-denver.com.

Need to park in downtown Denver? ParkiFi it!

Parking is getting more difficult in Denver. ParkiFi is launching an app that aims to make it easier to park in the city. 

The company already is generating significant interest. ParkiFi, which launched in 2014, has already raised $13.5 million in venture capital and was named a Denver Gazelle this year by the  Denver Office of Economic Development. Founders Ryan Sullivan and Rishi Malik say they created the company in response to an insight about downtown traffic that one out of three cars driving downtown Denver is actively looking to park. A process that takes an average of fifteen minutes.

"We're all guilty of circling block after block looking for a parking spot, and we're excited to launch the ParkiFi app to take this unneeded stress out of daily life," says Sullivan, the company's CEO. "Our app will help reduce congestion and, as a result, improve the environment and support Denver's 'smart city' initiatives. Our referral program is a great way to amplify this impact, while letting early adopters earn parking credits."

The app is slated to launch on the Apple and Google app stores in mid-November. It's designed to allow users to input an address into the app, which shows, in real time, which nearby lots and garages have open parking spots. The company plans to add metered street parking to the app in early 2017. 

Ahead of its official launch, the company also is offering early adopters a chance to get rewards for referring others to the app. People can register on ParkiFi's website, after which they'll receive an email with a unique link that they can share with others. When others use the link to sign up they receive parking reward, including discounts of $5 for five signups, $10 for 10 signups, $25 for 25 signups, and $75 for 75 signups.

Contact Confluence Denver Innovation & Jobs News Editor Chris Meehan with tips and leads for future stories at chris@confluence-denver.com.

Denver launches civic innovation accelerator

Colorado's municipal governments -- as many across the country -- remain cash-strapped, there's a need to make more out of less, harnessing the power of entrepreneurs and innovators to find low-cost solutions to civic issues and needs. That's where the Governmental Entrepreneurship Leadership Accelerator enters the picture.

The accelerator, a partnership of the City and County of Denver, Silicon Flatirons, University of Colorado Law School Dean Phil Weiser and the Blackstone Charitable Foundation, gave five law students a chance to work with nine Denver employees to address civic issues over a 12-week fellowship. The fellowship will conclude July 21 with a pitch fest attended by Denver Mayor Michael Hancock at Galvanize.

"To our knowledge, no other city or government has collaborated with a university for an accelerator program like this one before," says Courtney Law, communications director with the city's Department of Finance.

The pilot program will build on Blackstone's other work to support startups through its Blackstone LaunchPad and Blackstone Entrepreneurs Network. Its charitable arm, through the foundation has committed more than $40 million to such efforts since 2010.

Participants will work to address homeless transportation solutions, developing a retail regulatory framework, providing Internet access for low income individuals and increasing access to composting services. They'll be joined by mentors and guest speakers locally and from across the country to learn about and test entrepreneurial solutions to civic problems.

The Blackstone Charitable Foundation is supporting the pilot with a $75,000 grant. Silicon Flatirons will use the grant to run the pilot program.

Contact Confluence Denver Innovation & Jobs News Editor Chris Meehan with tips and leads for future stories at chris@confluence-denver.com.


Uber's AMBER Alert program, piloted in Denver, goes nationwide

Uber announced that its AMBER Alert program was launched nationwide after successfully being piloted in Denver. The company began testing the implementation of the alert system, which is designed to alert people in a geographic area by any means necessary about an abducted child in the region, in July 2015.

The Colorado-based branch of the ride service developed the idea and brought it to fruition. Explains Will McCollum, general manager of Uber of Colorado, "These are real people on the road at that time, they're the eyes and ears, and if they can help out local authorities our drivers want to do so."

As of August 2015 the AMBER Alert Program has been vital to recovering 772 children across the U.S. It's a voluntary partnership between law-enforcement agencies, broadcasters, transportation agencies and the wireless industry and pushes out all available information about serious child abductions. They're broadcast through radio, television, road signs and all available technology, including cell phones. Uber harnessed its power as a network of drivers and riders to incorporate the service.

"The AMBER Alert program's success is built on the ability to reach the right people at the right time with these potentially life-saving messages," says Robert Hoever, director of special programs, Missing Children Division, National Center For Missing & Exploited Children. "Uber's presence in communities all across the country will be an incredible asset and we are proud to team up with Uber to increase the reach of the AMBER Alert program and help bring more missing children home safely."

Uber's drivers in more than 180 cities across the U.S. will now receive time-sensitive and critical AMBER Alerts specific to their region through their app. The company explains that its "driver-partners" now receive geographically targeted information that may help to locate and recover a missing child as soon as a bulletin goes out.

"As a data-driven company, we understand the power of information for communities," Uber says of the service. "Since day one, our mission has been to connect people with reliable rides through the use of data and technology. As our footprint has grown throughout the years, so has our ability to use the Uber network in different ways."

Contact Confluence Denver Innovation & Jobs News Editor Chris Meehan with tips and leads for future stories at chris@confluence-denver.com.


WALKscope helps Denver address walkability weaknesses

WalkDenver introduced WALKscope, a new online app that allows people -- anywhere in Denver and some surrounding areas -- to quickly identify and add to a database of pedestrian issues. Already the organization is harnessing the app's power to create reports on pedestrian issues near schools, to make them safer who students who walk, bike or skate to school.

"It's an interactive map that anybody can use to crowd-source data about the pedestrian infrastructure in their own neighborhood," explains Jill Locantore, WalkDenver's Policy and Program Director. "They just add a pin to the map, add some information: Is there a sidewalk? How wide is it? Is it in good condition?"

Users can also upload information about intersections, crosswalks whether drivers are obeying stop signs and other safety concerns.

"It's so that we can start building up the evidence base of pedestrian infrastructure and where do we see the real needs and start focussing attention so the city can make better more informed decisions about how it chooses to spend its limited transportation dollars," Locantore says. "We're sharing the information with the principals of the schools, Denver Public Works, CDOT and other entities that are interested in using this information to make the case for some very targeted improvements."

WalkDenver partnered with Denver's PlaceMatters to create the app, according to Locantore. "It was kind of a perfect marriage," she says. "We got a grant from the organization Mile High Connects in 2013. WalkDenver and PlaceMatters together to develop the application."

The app launched in February at the Partners for Smart Growth conference and attendees were asked to, well, walk a mile in their shoes so to speak, identifying pedestrian issues and adding them to the map.

"Since then, we've been encouraging people to use it as a tool but also we're very focused on walk audits," Locantore says. The audits are more in-depth walkability reviews of neighborhoods and areas around schools, particularly in low-income neighborhoods and those with high pedestrian accidents.

Contact Confluence Denver Innovation & Jobs News Editor Chris Meehan with tips and leads for future stories at chris@confluence-denver.com.

Ticket Cricket offers an alternative to parking tickets

It seems Denver thrives on issuing parking tickets and infractions, after all when you’ve forgotten to pay off previous parking tickets -- after all, it’s not called the Oklahoma City Boot or the Big Apple Boot, it's the Denver Boot. But at least one local startup, Ticket Cricket, is trying to change that with a new app and perhaps a nicer way to avoid getting a ticket.

"What’s the purpose of the parking ticket?” asks Ticket Cricket Co-Founder and CEO Taylor Linnell. “If you get a ticket on your windshield two things happen: One, you have no idea you have a ticket, obviously you would have tried to pay your meter; or two, you got a ticket and now you’ve got no incentive to move your car. If the whole goal of parking tickets is to increase parking turnover, then actually issuing a parking ticket does the reverse of that."

“We want to give coverage to people when life gets away from them or the need goes a little longer than you thought, life’s just so busy and chaotic," Linnell adds. “It helps everyone involved. Why not find them a solution focussed on cooperation?" That’s where the Ticket Cricket app is trying to make headway in Denver and other cities.

The premise behind the app is the ability to extend the time a user can stay in a spot after the meter expires without receiving a ticket -- but still paying a fine -- for the time they need to get back to their vehicle and move it. For instance, a user could get 5 more minutes for $5 or 10 minutes for $10 -- still less than a $25 ticket but enough to make them want to move their vehicle before getting a full-fledged ticket. Linnell originally set up some ideal times and target prices but says the system needs to be flexible to allow different cities to implement it at the rates they deem appropriate.

The app works by communicating with parking patrollers and chirpers (users). When a user parks their vehicle they can log in, geotagging their vehicle. When a parking patroller nears a car owned by a chirper close to or after the time the chirper's time at the spot is up, the patroller is alerted and can push a request to the chirper to extend that time for a fee. The chirper can choose to pay to extend their time at the spot for a short time or get the ticket.

Taylor says he has an upcoming meeting with Denver Mayor Michael Hancock about the app and is in talks with other cities about implementing the Ticket Cricket system, but so far it hasn't been deployed. That said, the ad-supported app is already available for download at the iOS store.

Contact Confluence Denver Innovation & Jobs News Editor Chris Meehan with tips and leads for future stories at chris@confluence-denver.com.

Buy your car's fuel up front with Autowatts

Autowatts, a startup with roots in Denver, will soon start offering electric vehicle (EV) buyers a chance to purchase all the energy their vehicle will ever need when they buy their vehicle by financing a solar rooftop for EV owners.

"The premise of what Autowatts is doing is paring the purchase of a fuel supply with an electric vehicle," says Founder Alex Tiller, also CEO of solar installer Sunetric, which was recently purchased by RGS Energy. "This has never been possible in history, really."

Tiller explains that previously the size of the EV market, the vehicle's battery technology and the cost of photovoltaics were all factors that made creating this type of product offering difficult, it not economically feasible, but that's changed. "We're at a point in time now where essentially a buyer can prepay all the transportation fuel in one fell swoop and they can actually finance it," Tiller says.

"If you use a renewable energy system to offset your transportation miles, you are competing with oil," Tiller explains. "We know that in markets where oil creates the electrons, oil gets its butt kicked by solar." In Hawaii, where Sunetric is headquartered, just such a situation has played out, because most of the island state's electricity currently comes from oil or diesel-fired generators, which is more expensive than solar power. "You can get as little as a four-year payback on a residential solar system in the Hawaii market," Tiller explains.

To put it another way; "Imagine if you're going to buy a new car. If the car salesman offered at that time, 'Hey, for an extra $10,000, would you like to pay for all the gasoline you're ever going to need for this car, and for your next five cars, and I can finance it and that monthly payment is less than you would be spending on gasoline.' Most would say, 'yes,'" Tiller contends.

The solar array may not directly feed the vehicle but with an EV it helps simplify owners' energy costs. "The electrons get commingled in the house. It's not like the power system goes straight into your car. Your home is a small load system and we put the solar on the house." When most homeowners with EVs are at work, the system will produce power they can net meter, or sell energy back to the grid. Then when the homeowner comes home, they can charge their vehicle at home.

Another option, which will likely occur in the future as battery costs continue to come down, is actually storing the solar energy in batteries at the home until the homeowner comes home to charge their EV up. As of 2014, however, battery technology is generally still too expensive to justify the expense, though Tiller sees that changing.

Autowatts completed its first beta in Hawaii where Sunetric is headquartered. "We're still a very early technology. We are in a beta mode right now," Tiller explains. While he was tight-lipped on the launch strategy, he says the company will roll out the new version in some markets before the end of 2014.

Contact Confluence Denver Innovation & Jobs News Editor Chris Meehan with tips and leads for future stories at chris@confluence-denver.com.

Andrew Hudson's Career Bootcamps help job seekers and career changers

Looking for a job in Denver? Looking to change careers or returning to the workforce after a hiatus? Check out one of Andrew Hudson’s upcoming Career Bootcamps. Hudson, who runs the eponymous site, Andrew Hudson's Jobs List, and the career bootcamps, is holding four three-hour sessions throughout March, starting on March 18. Hudson is no stranger to the bootcamps or the career list. He's been running a jobs website in Denver (originally www.prjobslist.com) since 2005. Today the jobs list sends a newsletter and updated list of positions -- over 1,000 professional positions in Colorado a month -- to subscribers every Monday.

While Hudson isn’t a corporate headhunter or jobs placement agent, he's dedicated a lot of time to helping others find jobs, including holding between 40 and 50 career bootcamps annually. "I've done this for a seven years. I've had about 600 or 700 go through the bootcamps," he says.

The career bootcamps, which cost $175, are often attended by mid-or senior level professionals, according to Hudson. "They come for a variety of reasons, they may hate their boss, or are looking to reinvent themselves." He adds that some may be returning to the workforce after an absence as a stay-at-home parent or because of the recession.

"The common thread, no matter why people are looking for a job…is they haven’t had to do it for a while and the rules have changed dramatically," he contends. He attributes at least part of that the uprise of online job search giants like Monster.com.

Hudson limits the bootcamps to 10 people. "The reason I do it the small-group dynamic is easier to manage and more people are willing to engage more," he explains.

Attendees might be surprised to find that the sessions aren’t just resume building sessions. "To me it’s more about having a really good conversation with yourself about what you value in a job," Hudson says. "The strategy of successful job seekers is…they research what it is they want to do and know how their backgrounds talents and skills are aligned with what they want to do." As such the resume building part of the sessions are last.

Hudson is holding the bootcamps at Fluid Coffee Bar's Fluid Meeting Spaces March 18, 20, 22 and 26. He plans on hosting additional bootcamps in the summer.

Contact Confluence Denver Innovation & Jobs News Editor Chris Meehan with tips and leads for future stories at chris@confluence-denver.com. 

CommutePays offers mileage rewards program for everyone

"I always hated commuting," says CommutePays Founder and CEO Shahir Ahmed.

He figures there are plenty of people with a similar mindset among the country's 140 million commuters -- 10 million of whom commute an hour or more daily.

It follows that CommutePays uses location-based data to market businesses to commuters who pass them on a near-daily basis, and commuters earn rewards just like air travelers. "It's the everyone, everyday miles app," explains Ahmed.

As commuters travel from "point A to point B," whether they're in a car or a bus or on a bike or a train, CommutePays sends them push messages from partner businesses.

Commuters can earn bonus miles by engaging with these partner brands, and ultimately earn "location-based rewards" for their commute, says Ahmed. "You earn miles by doing something you do every day."

CommutePays is partnering with numerous companies to integrate its technology into other apps. "Our app will be a button within those apps," says Ahmed. The company completed a pilot in New York last year and is currently working to raise an undisclosed Series A funding round.

Ahmed says CommutePays is part of a larger trend. "The next generation of apps are utility apps that reward you," he says.

Ahmed started CommutePays in Denver in 2011 and left to work at San Francisco's RocketSpace in fall 2012. He subsequently raised a seed round and returned to Denver in August 2013. The company is now based in LoDo.

Despite his difficulty fundraising in Denver, Ahmed says that he came back for other reasons. "The quality of life here in Denver is so much better -- that's why I came back here."

Contact Confluence Denver Innovation & Jobs News Editor Eric Peterson with tips and leads for future stories at eric@confluence-denver.com.

UberDenver launches uberX

UberDenver has launched a budget alternative to taxis, uberX, in Denver.

"UberX is our new low-cost product," says Will McCollum, UberDenver General Manager.

The company has recruited hundreds of drivers -- "normal folks who go through a strenuous background check," says McCollum -- who use their vehicle and are paired with paying customers vis Uber's mobile app.

"UberX is 30 percent cheaper than a taxi," says McCollum, noting that a five-mile trip is about $15. "It's really a game changer."

The service will be offered for free from Nov. 18-21. Customers can get up to four free rides totaling $30.

Drivers "are doing fantastic," adds McCollum. "They're able to make hundreds of dollars a week." Many are ex-taxi drivers, as well as a number of personal trainers, bartenders and baristas who moonlight as uberX drivers.

Uber is also launching its UberSUV service in Summit, Eagle and Gilpin counties in late November, and continues to offer its UberBlack and UberSUV services in Denver and Boulder.

"Denver's incredible," says McCollum. "The overall market is taking off. It's been underserved for so long."

UberDenver had to contend with proposed regulations from the Colorado Public Utilities Commission that would have effectively killed the company, but prevailed after a deliberation in September.

"Uber is completely legal in Colorado," says McCollum. "We're good to go."

Contact Confluence Denver Innovation & Jobs News Editor Eric Peterson with tips and leads for future stories at eric@confluence-denver.com.

Now hiring, LoHi's urHub takes location-based services to new level on Colorado highways

urHub is currently looking to add a salesperson and developers to its six-person staff.
 
Founded in 2011, the company has focused on clients and not the general public with its location-based apps, says CEO John Cronin. 
 
"We'll never make a consumer-facing app," says Cronin. "It's all about our partners."
 
Current clients include the Colorado Department of Transportation (CDOT) and the Breckenridge Resort Chamber. Under the urHub model, clients pay a nominal fee, but the bulk of the revenue comes from advertisers. 
 
"We go out and fund the development through bringing advertisers into the mix," says Cronin. "We look at it and say, 'Can we find a way to fund it?' We won a five-year contract with CDOT -- we're basically building technology for the state for free."
 
The result, CDOT Mobile, is touted by Cronin as "the only app sanctioned by the state" with "the most accurate data about what's happening on Colorado's highways in real time" -- namely I-70.
 
Explains Cronin: "When there are delays of one or two hours, we send a message." The message will often include relevant advertisements from relevant hotels and restaurants.
 
Cronin says urHub is "in discussions" with VC firms for a target infusion of $1.5 million, as well as nine other states for similar deals to its arrangement with CDOT. Other targets include tourism bureaus and like-minded organizations.

Contact Confluence Denver Innovation & Jobs News Editor Eric Peterson with tips and leads for future stories at eric@confluence-denver.com.

Golden Triangle-based UberDenver brings taxicab alternative to Denver, primed to grow in 2013

With offices at the Golden Triangle's Galvanize, UberDenver, the local office of San Francisco-based Uber, launched last summer. 
 
Now in about 20 cities from Amsterdam to Vancouver, Uber provides a smartphone app that helps better connect licensed limousine drivers with customers. The fare, which is about 25 percent higher than a taxi, is automatically billed to a card on file.
 
The technology allows for a more streamlined and efficient process than hailing a cab on the street, says UberDenver GM Will McCollum.

“Instead of a client finding a car or a cab, we use a GPS signal on an iPhone or Android smartphone,” he explains. “You can see the driver coming on the app. It usually takes three to five minutes.”
 
The company has three employees in Denver, nearly 200 partner drivers and is poised to grow locally in 2013, says McCollum.
 
But the service also helps catalyze growth at partner companies like Special Times Limousine in Brighton.

“Uber is ultimately designed to provide help to the small-business owner to grow their business,” says UberDenver's McCollum. “We give them access to a clientele that normally wouldn't use a black car.”

Special Times Limousine Owner Kevin Labonte says UberDenver generated $85,000 for him in the last four months of 2012, allowing him to bring on another driver and buy another car. 
 
“It's good for business,” says Labonte. “It's also good for Denver. It provides a nice alternative to the taxicabs.”
 
UberDenver could be bracing for a challenge from the state's taxi regulators at the Colorado Public Utilities Commission. The company successfully fought off a similar policy challenge in Washington, D.C. It also partners with taxi companies in Boston, Chicago and other cities with its UberTAXI product.
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