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Exercise and medical programming facility to open in Catalyst HTI

Exercise and medical programming company WEL is joining the roster of healthcare-related tenants at Catalyst HTI, a health innovation center in Denver’s River North (RiNo) neighborhood.

WEL provides exercise and medical programming to complement its members’ healthcare plans.

“WEL is working to change the healthcare industry, and Catalyst will provide both the pulpit and environment that allows us to communicate our knowledge and conversations on exercise and medical integration,” WEL President Nick Edwards said. “WEL is providing the staff and thought leadership around exercise and medicine that is going to change the way people view healthcare and exercise. Getting the Catalyst community on board with this change and collaborating with this community for pieces of their expertise will help us to achieve this goal and drive outcomes.”

WEL delivers care across multiple sites in Denver and across the United States. Within Catalyst HTI, WEL will bring its proprietary technology suite to the facility’s fitness center. It will host events and forums featuring the most advanced technologies and techniques in the industry. WEL is on track to have more than 250,000 members by 2020; its location at Catalyst HTI will help expand its offering and voice.

Catalyst HTI, which opened in early July at 35th Street and Brighton Boulevard, is bringing together a variety of industry disruptors in healthcare. Organizations in Catalyst HTI will have access to potential clients and investors in established companies, while larger corporations can surround themselves with emerging technologies in an environment filled with entrepreneurs and growth companies. Other tenants include Delta Dental, the American Osteopathic Association, Hitachi Consulting and the University of Denver.
 

Commons on Champa helped create 47 companies

The Commons on Champa supported 63 entrepreneurs founding 47 companies in its new nine-week business development accelerator program, resulting in ore than 60 new jobs in downtown Denver, according to a report from the Downtown Denver Partnership.

The Commons on Champa is a nationally recognized public entrepreneurship center led by the Downtown Denver Partnership. Its business development accelerator program is called CO.Starters at The Commons.

The 2017-2018 “Commons Impact Report: Another Year at the Intersection of Risk & Reward” features many entrepreneurs who leveraged The Commons programs to develop their businesses in 2017-1018, including Sarah Tuneberg, co-founder and CEO of distaster recovery technology company Geospiza. Tuneberg says the connections she made at The Commons led to her team’s successful application to Techstars, a global accelerator for technology startups where Geospiza attracted the clients and investors she needed to scale the company.

“The CO.Starters at The Commons program took our product from so-so to incredible,” Tuneberg says.

The report also revealed that more than 400 volunteers provided 4,900 volunteers with 2,250 hours of training, counsel, advice and mentorship in the last year at The Commons on Champa, according to the report.

Nearly 30 million Americans are running businesses today, and reports indicate our metropolitan area consistently ranks among the top 10 regions for startup activity, said Jacqui Dietrich, manager of The Commons program.

“Organizations and individuals are increasingly interested in achieving economic and community impact through entrepreneurship,” Dietrich said. “With young companies driving job and wealth creation and economic growth in our region, the Commons serves as a central point of access to the personal, business, financial and community support that entrepreneurs need. We are working to improve the local environment for entrepreneurs to achieve higher rates of startup success and make Denver No. 1 in entrepreneurship.”

 

Worrell Inc. joins mix at Catalyst HTI

A global healthcare design, strategy and innovation firm is the latest to announce it will open up shop in Catalyst HTI, a new Denver healthcare innovation hub opening in River North in June.

New to Denver, Minneapolis-based Worrell Inc. is taking advantage of the opportunity to collaborate with other health-tech industry leaders in developing creative solutions that will enable companies to thrive and transform their businesses.

“Worrell is uniquely positioned to engage with the blossoming healthcare community in Colorado,” says Derek Mathers, the company’s director of advanced development. “We are excited to join this growing list of leading health and technology companies and for the potential to share our research, design, engineering and human factors with local startups and collaborate with other experts on the shared goal of improving healthcare.”

Worrell is joining companies like Kaiser Permanente, Medical Group Management Association, Delta Dental, Prime Health and University of Colorado, as well as dozens of health-tech startups.

Catalyst HTI is designed to bring together stakeholders from across the healthcare market to foster collaboration and accelerate innovation.

As one of the fastest-growing technology markets, Denver is becoming a favored location for many digital health and medical device startups from across the country. Worrell’s goal is to tap into the innovation culture and add to the growing tech economy in the Mile High City.

“With the addition of Worrell and its vast experience designing some of the most impactful medical technologies in the world, we are connecting dots that have previously been disconnected,” says Mike Biselli, president of Catalyst HTI.
 

Home Builders Association to host Innovation Summit

The Home Builders Association of Metro Denver will host its first HBA Innovation Summit in February.

The event, which is open to the public, will feature speakers focused on driving change and innovation in Colorado’s home building industry to better serve the needs of future new homebuyers and consumers looking to remodel their homes. The summit is from 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. Feb. 9 at the Seawell Ballroom.

“As we start the new year, the HBA Innovations Summit will enable both the industry and the customers we serve to think about home building in new ways,” says Jeff Whiton, CEO and executive vice president of the Home Builders Association of Metro Denver. “Many of our member organizations have already achieved national recognition for their creative approaches to design and marketing, and we hope to continue to lead the industry with events like the Innovation Summit.”

the theme for the event, “Leadership Through Change,” will offer a timely, relevant and expansive view of how builders developers, remodelers, architects, mortgage lenders, title companies, subcontractors, suppliers and service providers can embrace change in their own organizations to meet the evolving needs of home buyers. Speakers for the event will be announced this month.

Tickets to the HBA Innovations Summit are $95 for HBA members and $150 for non-members. To register, visit www.hbadenver.com and click on Home Builder Events. Non-members may register by clicking the “login/register” button and following the instructions for non-members.

Egg Strategy to locate in Catalyst HTI

Egg Strategy is the latest healthcare company to join the roster of tenants at Catalyst Health-Tech Innovation (HTI) in RiNo.

The Boulder company helps the world’s largest health and wellness organizations uncover insights, launch products and build strategies to unlock Growth and close the gap between patients and providers. Egg joins companies like Kaiser Permanente, the American Diabetes Association and the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus.

“Egg is passionate about Catalyst HTI’s mission to reimagine health and revolutionize healthcare, says Kristin Apple, the company’s managing direct of health. “Egg wants not only to be a part of this conversation but also to play a major role in this important and critical moment in history and the future of health.”

Catalyst HTI is under construction on a full city block at 3513 Brighton Blvd. The project, expected to open in May, brings together a full spectrum of stakeholders in the healthcare innovation space to build a collaborative community that accelerates the innovation and reimagining in the healthcare industry.

“Egg’s track record of helping healthcare companies unlock growth and close the gap between patients and providers makes them an ideal member,” says Mike Biselli, the healthcare entrepreneur who envisioned Catalyst HTI. “The stronger and more diverse our community of innovators grows, the closer it brings us to being able to provide a healthcare system that works for this country.”
 

Lyft Locates Driver Hub in Steam on the Platte

Rideshare company Lyft has opened a driver Hub at Steam on the Platte in Denver’s Sun Valley neighborhood.

Lyft chose Steam on the Platte for its driver support center because of its convenient access to highways and thoroughfares, as well as the development’s location in the heart of Denver.

When development firm Urban Ventures was discussing the types of tenants it wanted to locate in Steam on the Platte, words like entrepreneurial, energetic and pioneering came to mind, says Susan Powers, president of the firm.

“We love the values of Lyft,” Powers says. “We love the way you treat your drivers and customers.”

Steam on the Platte is within walking distance of the Auraria campus and the Broncos' stadium. It also is at the intersection of the Lakewood Gulch and Platte River bike paths and a short walk to two light-rail stations at Decatur-Federal and West Auraria.

Urban Ventures and White Construction Group formed a partnership to acquire the property in 2014 from the estate of the late Englewood-based real estate agent Arvin Weiss. At the time of the acquisition, there were two illegal marijuana grows operating and the Evil Souls motorcycle gang had taken over one of the buildings as its clubhouse.

Urban Ventures and White have since created a mixed-use project that has attracted several other tenants in addition to Lyft. NIMBL, a technology consulting company, moved into the space in September. Two Denver architecture firms also have moved into Steam: Olson Lavoie and Davis Wince.

Urban Ventures and White Construction have started working on the next phase of the project: converting a 6,000-square-foot former gas station with a bowstring roof into a restaurant. The other buildings on the 3.2-acre site have been demolished to make way for more office space and residential buildings.

Rail~Volution conference will showcase Denver's transportation advances

Rail~Volution is coming to Denver Sept. 17-20.

The conference, hosted by the Regional Transportation District (RTD) and local partners, focuses on building livable communities through transit and multimodal investments. National leaders, planners and advocates will examine and discuss all that the Denver region has accomplished since it last served as the host city for the gathering 17 years ago.

During 25 mobile workshops and more than 75 sessions over four days, leaders and practitioners from the fields of government, transit, real estate, business, finance, environment and advocacy will explore pertinent transit issues, opportunities and challenges common to the Rocky Mountain West.

“Denver has an extraordinary story to tell about how transit investments and cross-sector collaboration have changed the economic trajectory of the regions,” says Dan Bartholomay, CEO of Rail~Volution. “The Denver community found the right mix of investments that lead to truly livable places — places that take care to ensure affordability and access to jobs, good homes and healthy lifestyles. The Denver region’s integrated approach is exactly what other cities and regions are hoping to learn about at Rail~Volution.”

Featured speakers include Colorado Gov. John Hickenlooper; Denver Mayor Michael Hancock; Peter Rogoff, CEO of Sound Transit in Seattle; Phil Washington, CEO of L.A. Metro; Oregon Congressman Earl Blumenauer; Maurice Jones, president of Local Initiatives Support Corp. in New York; Christine Marquez-Hudson, president and CEO of The Denver Foundation; and John Martin, president and CEO of the Southeastern Institute of Research Inc. in Richmond, Va.

Grad students help design a more walkable Montbello

WalkDenver, in its latest partnership with CU Denver graduate students, is tackling walkability issues in northeast Denver’s Montbello neighborhood. 

Bordered by major streets including 56th Avenue, Peoria Street, Chambers Road and I-70 the neighborhood struggles with ensuring its pedestrians, including the children who make up about 40 percent of residents in the area, have access to safe walking routes.

WalkDenver reports that more than 90 percent of students at McGlone Academy and Maxwell Elementary -- part of its 10 school Safe Routes to School Travel Plan project -- live within a mile of their respective campuses and don’t have school buses, meaning that children in the area walk, bike or are driven to school. In making the assessments, the CU Denver students performed on-site audits, researched demographic data interviewed local residents and used the WALKscope tool.

The CU Denver students and their assistant professor, Ken Schroeppel, presented their findings to community members. They found a number of ways to help make Montbello a safer place for pedestrians. They recommended upgrading sidewalks to current wider standards throughout the neighborhood and identified a lack of safe crossings on the wide roads throughout the neighborhood. Other factors that reduce walkability in the neighborhood include poorly maintained sidewalks, high speed limits and a dearth of shade trees. The students recommended improving sidewalks, crossings and bicycle lanes close to schools, parks, recreation centers and libraries.

Contact Confluence Denver Innovation & Jobs News Editor Chris Meehan with tips and leads for future stories at chris@confluence-denver.com.

 

The Denver Art Museum seeks ideas for Untitled Final Fridays in 2017

The Denver Art Museum is hosting "Meet Here: An Evening of Untitled Idea Brewing and Creative Criss-Cross" on Nov. 18, a brainstorming event for creatives and others to generate ideas for outdoor installations, residencies and the 2017 Untitled Final Fridays series of events at the museum. The events bring local artists and the community together for exhibitions and installations. The workshop is open from 6 to 8 in the evening.

"Ideas are needed for upcoming projects including outdoor installations, residencies, and 2017's Untitled Final Fridays," explains Camila Navarrette, a spokesperson for the museum. "Local craftsmen, chefs, musicians, artists and other movers and makers are invited to brainstorm the activities for the upcoming Untitled season and potential new programs for DAM."

The free event is being held from 6 to 8 p.m. on the first floor of the North Building and will include food and beverages from a cash bar. The event will include mini-think tank sessions where attendees will work together to generate ideas. 

People can send RSVPs to lhegge@denverartmuseum.org.

Contact Confluence Denver Innovation & Jobs News Editor Chris Meehan with tips and leads for future stories at chris@confluence-denver.com.


Rose Community Foundation awarding Innovate for Good grants

The Rose Community Foundation will host an event at the Cable Center on Sept. 14 to award grants through its Innovate for Good program, which is supporting youth projects and youth-adult projects with a total of $250,000. The program announced the nine finalists for the youth-adult partnerships this week and will choose the six awardees, each of which will receive $30,000 to realize their projects, at the event.

The organization already selected four youth-led projects to each receive a $5,000 grant and support to realize their projects. The youth awards will support the CeC Early College Mentorship Program, which will mentor-match high school junior students with high-school freshmen; the Juniors for Seniors project to build one-on-one relationships with teen volunteers and nursing home residents; the Stories Worth Saving project for teens to document stories of assisted-living residents; and the Theatre for Social Change Group project which aims to offer teens ways to use the arts to explore difficult social issues. 

For 2016, the second year for the awards, the foundation asked youth and youth partnering with adults to develop projects that answer the question: "What idea could you bring to life to empower youth to make the community better?"

Last year's awards challenge didn't have a thematic focus, according to Sarah Indyk, Rose Community Foundation's director of special projects. This year it was separated into two different pathways, with the youth awards and the youth-adult awards. "The youth-led projects were really conceived of by youths without formal adult partners," she explains. She adds that since the adult-youth partnership projects are a lot different it made sense to go through a parallel process; the Sept. 14 event will decide which youth-adult projects will be funded.

“Both groups will benefit from extensive training coaching and support from the Youth Leadership Institute,” Indyk says. "We're running a full incubator providing support to all awardees and finalists. It's a way we could support all the finalists even if they don't receive funds. That amounts to $50,000 in additional support."

Visit rcfdenver.org/IFG to learn more about the program and finalists.

Contact Confluence Denver Innovation & Jobs News Editor Chris Meehan with tips and leads for future stories at chris@confluence-denver.com.

Pop-up beer garden coming to Skyline Park

Beginning Aug. 19, Skyline Park will host a pop-up beer garden showcasing Colorado craft beers. Adults will be able to enjoy a beer at a 40,000-square-foot area at Skyline Park and relax in the shade under a tent or in open-air seating. The beer garden is part of the city's effort to encourage activities in Denver's public spaces like the Meet in the Street events.

"The Downtown Denver Partnership is excited to bring forward a new and unique program to encourage residents, employees and visitors to gather in Downtown Denver in one of our most vibrant parks," says John Desmond, executive vice president of downtown environment for the Downtown Denver Partnership. "The Skyline Beer Garden builds on several initiatives to bring diverse and attractive programming to Skyline Park and support long-term strategies to create a premier outdoor downtown that contributes to an economically thriving center city."

The family-friendly beer garden will feature 12 beers on tap and serve food from the Lowry Beer Garden. Oktoberfest-style tables will seat more than 350, and the operation will create 15 to 20 jobs while open through Sept. 15. 

The menu will include gourmet brats, burgers, salads, pretzels and dipping sauces. The garden also will host music on Fridays and Saturdays and the garden will include ping pong, a nine-hole miniature golf course and cornhole. 

Contact Confluence Denver Innovation & Jobs News Editor Chris Meehan with tips and leads for future stories at chris@confluence-denver.com.

Denver proposes dedicated fund for affordable housing

On July 13, Denver Mayor Michael Hancock and Councilwoman Robin Kniech introduced the details of the city's plan to create funding to support affordable housing.

Pending approval by Denver City Council, the funding will be generated by way of development fees and property taxes. Over the next 10 years, the new funding stream could generate $150 million, allowing for the construction of 6,000 new homes for low- to moderate-income families in the city and catalyze thousands of jobs in the process.

"There is no more important a priority in Denver right now than affordable housing," Mayor Hancock said. "In my state of the city speech yesterday, I spoke about the thousands of people who lack the simple advantages so many of us take for granted, like a place to call home. Home ownership gives families a foundation to build equity, build wealth and build a life. This is a fair, balanced and modest approach to address one of the most pressing problems facing Denver today."

The proposal from the mayor's office are expected to cost residential property owners $1 a month and commercial property owners $145 annually for every $1 million worth of commercial valuation. It also would establish a one-time development fee on new construction projects collected when a project receives its building permit. Residential construction fees for single-family homes will carry a 60 cent per square foot fee and multi-family homes will carry a $1.50 per square foot fee. Industrial projects will pay a 40 cents per square foot fee and retail, hotel and other commercial development will pay a $1.70 per square foot fee.

"By pairing a small portion of the property tax revenue that Denver voters approved almost four years ago with what would be one of the lowest one-time fees on new residential and commercial development in the nation, our broader community will be coming together with a sector of the economy generating some of the demand to create a bold solution for affordable housing in Denver," Kniech contended.

Contact Confluence Denver Innovation & Jobs News Editor Chris Meehan with tips and leads for future stories at chris@confluence-denver.com.

QuickZip's sheets win $250,000 at Capital Championship

Denver-based QuickZip has reimagined one of most used pieces of people's homes -- sheets. The line of products make it easier, quicker and cleaner to change sheets on beds ranging from cribs to California Kings.The company won the 2016 Capital Championship and $250,000 to help the company expand.

QuickZip's sheets cover the bottom of the bed, and the top is zipped into place. The flat top layer of the sheet s changed and washed and the bottom remains in place. Clothes don't get stuck in the sheet in the dryer and the clean sheet can be folded flat for easy storage. When the sheets are changed, people don't have to lift or move the mattress.

"This is a well-deserved win for QuickZip as they faced incredible competition from numerous startup companies across the country," said David Brey, executive director of Capital Championship. The championship, funded by Blue Ocean Enterprises and sponsored by OtterBox, Hewlett Packard, FirstBank, EKS&H and Hogan Lovells, had 10 finalists this year. It is aimed at the startup community to help entrepreneurs gain exposure, networking mentoring and cash.

"We saw tremendous presentations throughout the tournament and are thrilled for QuickZip. We appreciate the work they put into their company and hope this new cash infusion and mentorship helps move them to the next level, continuing the company's trajectory to success," Brey explained.

QuickZip will use the prize to help further its growth. "We will use the money for sales and marketing and product development so that we can bring smarter bedding solutions to more people and in new market segments," says QuickZip founder Elizabeth Sopher. "We will squeeze every drop out of the mentorship offered by OtterBox and Blue Ocean Enterprises to maximize the impact of the funds. In the short term we will gain capacity through our partners and contractors and would likely hire in the longer term," she adds.  

Contact Confluence Denver Innovation & Jobs News Editor Chris Meehan with tips and leads for future stories at chris@confluence-denver.com.


Innovate for Good 2016 challenges Denver to empower youth with up to $250K

Rose Community Foundation has announced its Innovate for Good 2016 challenge. This year, the organization is calling for people to answer the following question: What idea could you bring to life to empower youth to make the community better?

"We believe Denver's youth can do great things," says Lisa Robinson, Rose Community Foundation trustee and chair of the Innovate for Good Committee. "And, through the Innovate for Good project, we are thrilled to give them a voice and the resources to help make our community even better."

The challenge not only asks what can empower youth in the city, it asks youth between 13 and 18 to propose ideas. Adults, working as equal partners with youth, can submit their ideas through through the foundation's website. Submissions must be in by May 31 and the submission process requires applicants to answer a series of questions and submit a video, up to a minute long, about their team's idea. Finalists will be announced in August and awardees will be selected in September.

"More than ever, as the greater Denver community continues to grow, empowering youth to inspire change can have great benefits for the next generation," Robinson says. "They have the energy, talent and potential to share innovative ideas, and we felt it was time to tap directly into their experiences and perspective." 

In all, the foundation will award up $250,000 in grants to implement winning ideas. The foundation says it is looking for innovative Denver-based projects that can make an impact within a year.

The foundation launched the Innovation for Good Challenge in 2015. It had more than 400 applicants and awarded grants to 10 proposals.

Contact Confluence Denver Innovation & Jobs News Editor Chris Meehan with tips and leads for future stories at chris@confluence-denver.com.


Denver to host Solar Decathlon in 2017

Denver and the Department of Energy officials have announced that the city will host the international Solar Decathlon competition in 2017. The event will award a total of $2 million to the teams that compete in its 10 challenges to make a livable, affordable, compact solar-powered home -- essentially what each team believes will be the home of tomorrow.

Denver becomes the third U.S. city to host the biennial event, which began in Washington, D.C., and has since taken place in Irvine, California. It brings roughly 60,000 visitors on average. "As one of the top 10 metro areas for solar installations and sunny days, Denver is a great choice to host the U.S. Department of Energy Solar Decathlon,"says DOE Under Secretary Franklin Orr.

The decathlon challenges 16 teams of college students from the U.S. and around the world to design and build energy efficient, solar-powered homes that they have to transport from their location to the event location at Denver's Pena Station development. In 2017 for the first time ever, teams will receive $100,000 to defray construction and transportation costs and the teams that do the best in the gauntlet of events will receive extra awards. The team that takes first place will receive $300,000, second place gets $225,000 and third place takes $150,000.

"Denver is proud to work with the U.S. Department of Energy to bring this fun and engaging academic competition to our city," says Denver Mayor Michael Hancock. "This opportunity not only highlights the Denver metro area's leadership in energy efficiency but allows us to spotlight our burgeoning solar energy industry."

Contact Confluence Denver Innovation & Jobs News Editor Chris Meehan with tips and leads for future stories at chris@confluence-denver.com.

30 Placemaking Articles | Page: | Show All
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