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Colorado Harvest Company introduces Operation TransparenC

Colorado Harvest Company is introducing Operation TransparenC, an effort to show its growing processes in great detail to consumers and other industry members. In doing so, the company is aiming to show consumers how legal cannabis growers are distinguishing themselves from black market growers. The company is posting information about the purity and potency cannabis available from its three Colorado Harvest centers.

"Colorado Harvest Company is leading the way on  TransparenC, but our hope is that other companies follow suit," says CEO Tim Cullen. "I would welcome any partnership that has the same goals in mind." 

The company announced the new program last week after the the Colorado Department of Agriculture showed the purity of Colorado Harvest’s cannabis for the second consecutive year. The department tested hundreds of the company’s samples between November 2016 and January 2017. 

"We are constantly working toward ways to be different while providing a high quality experience for our customers," Cullen says. "There are two ways to look at regulation. One, it's a great opportunity for us to differentiate ourselves from the black market and shine for our customers; or two, the regulation becomes the focus and not the customer. We have to keep our eye on the ball while we comply with ever increasing demands from regulatory bodies." 

Cullen has begun speaking with 22 officials from state agriculture departments as far away as Florida and Guam. He also is presenting information about profitable and compliant production methods at two upcoming cannabis conferences.

Contact Confluence Denver Innovation & Jobs News Editor Chris Meehan with tips and leads for future stories at chris@confluence-denver.com.

Gaming bar Board Game Republic opens in Baker

Denver's Board Game Republic is holding its grand opening this weekend. The pub and cafe boasts more than 600 board games for those who aren't just satisfied with the average game of Sorry! anymore and want to up their Parcheesi game instead.

"Board games are perfect at bringing people together and creating interaction," says founder Keith Meyers. Meyers is well-suited as game master and curator for the cafe. He's worked for Hasbro, The Game Keeper and IELLO, among others, and  has invented dozens of games and taught classes in game design.

The pub will host its grand opening on Aug. 20-21. The opening will include local gaming celebrities and publishers.

"We'll have hourly drawings for free stuff -- games, promos, toys and just plain goofy things," Meyers says. "We'll have pop-up tournaments for prizes, scattered over the weekend." He adds that events will culminate in a grand prize drawing of $250 worth of board in games, sponsored by Time Well Spent games and $250 in smaller prizes.

Like newer room escape adventures, Board Game Republic is designed to embrace Denver's gaming culture without sticking them in front of a computer screen. The collection of games ranges from Monopoly and Clue to modern titles including Settlers of Catan or Pandemic, and party games such as Telestrations and Codenames.

Visitors to the unique pub on 1st Avenue and Santa Fe Drive can pay $5 to receive all-day access to collection of games. Staff is on hand to serve food and introduce visitors to new games.

Contact Confluence Denver Innovation & Jobs News Editor Chris Meehan with tips and leads for future stories at chris@confluence-denver.com.


Denver proposes dedicated fund for affordable housing

On July 13, Denver Mayor Michael Hancock and Councilwoman Robin Kniech introduced the details of the city's plan to create funding to support affordable housing.

Pending approval by Denver City Council, the funding will be generated by way of development fees and property taxes. Over the next 10 years, the new funding stream could generate $150 million, allowing for the construction of 6,000 new homes for low- to moderate-income families in the city and catalyze thousands of jobs in the process.

"There is no more important a priority in Denver right now than affordable housing," Mayor Hancock said. "In my state of the city speech yesterday, I spoke about the thousands of people who lack the simple advantages so many of us take for granted, like a place to call home. Home ownership gives families a foundation to build equity, build wealth and build a life. This is a fair, balanced and modest approach to address one of the most pressing problems facing Denver today."

The proposal from the mayor's office are expected to cost residential property owners $1 a month and commercial property owners $145 annually for every $1 million worth of commercial valuation. It also would establish a one-time development fee on new construction projects collected when a project receives its building permit. Residential construction fees for single-family homes will carry a 60 cent per square foot fee and multi-family homes will carry a $1.50 per square foot fee. Industrial projects will pay a 40 cents per square foot fee and retail, hotel and other commercial development will pay a $1.70 per square foot fee.

"By pairing a small portion of the property tax revenue that Denver voters approved almost four years ago with what would be one of the lowest one-time fees on new residential and commercial development in the nation, our broader community will be coming together with a sector of the economy generating some of the demand to create a bold solution for affordable housing in Denver," Kniech contended.

Contact Confluence Denver Innovation & Jobs News Editor Chris Meehan with tips and leads for future stories at chris@confluence-denver.com.

PlainSmart offers DNA testing to aid in weight loss

In the never-ending quest to help people manage and lose weight, there is a slew of options. Now Denver's PlainSmart is offering a new tool, DNA testing.

The company is using DNA testing to help understand how genetic markers can impact metabolisms. "DNA testing identifies a body's strengths and weaknesses in processing nutrients, as well as personal requirements for physical activity. When we look at a client's genetic profile, we can interpret the markers and understand how their body is able (or not able) to metabolize foods," said Kassandra Gyimesi, RDN, PlainSmart's clinic director. "The report guides a lifetime nutrition plan that is medically sound, realistic and created solely for each individual's needs and lifestyle. With these diagnostic tools, we can pinpoint a client's metabolic rate, body composition and how his or her body responds to macronutrients -- focusing on unique needs for optimal weight-loss success."

The company claims that genetic testing, accomplished through a cheek swab, can show a genetic profile that reveals how a person processes proteins, fats and carbohydrates, and how to properly proportion them within a nutrition plan; ideal intensity and duration of physical activity for weight, energy and overall health; and a person's tendency to develop and maintain healthy eating habits.

The testing can help develop a nutritional and exercise program for PlainSmart's clients and is just one of its tools. It also uses a body composition analysis (BCA), meetings with a Registered Dietitian Nutritionist (RDN) and provides a customized plan for its customers that starts at $295.

"Weight loss is a personal journey.  And, nothing is as personal as DNA, so we recognized it was time to bring them together for the best possible weight-management outcome," said Jonathan Harding, president of PlainSmart.

Contact Confluence Denver Innovation & Jobs News Editor Chris Meehan with tips and leads for future stories at chris@confluence-denver.com.


March shapes up as Denver's other big beer month

Almost half a year from the other big beer event in Denver, the Great American Beer Festival (GABF), March is shaping up to be just as important for Colorado's fermentation revolution.

Colorado Craft Beer Week begins with the one-of-a-kind Collaboration Fest on March 19 and pours through March 30 at Strange Craft Beer Co. with an auction and IPA Throwdown. In fact, for the purposes of innovative brewing and moving the local industry forward, March might even be more important to craft brewing than GABF.

Collaboration Fest, being held for the second year at the Broncos' stadium at Mile High, is probably the most innovative of all the events since it invites breweries from across the world to come together and create what are mostly one-off beers with their fellow brewers. In fact, last year it was dubbed "America's most creative beer fest" by Food & Wine Magazine.

It's an important event for the industry because it encourages brewers from all over the world to exchange notes and practices -- and of course plenty of beer. "We can guarantee one thing: the beers of Collaboration Fest are sure to be some of the most unique, delicious and limited offerings you've ever tasted," say festival organizers, which include the Colorado Brewers Guild, Visit Denver and Two Parts. "Per festival guidelines, one brewery must based in Colorado and a member of the Colorado Brewers Guild, while the collaborating partners could be located next door, across the state, across the country or even overseas."  

This year the fest will boast more than 85 projects from 149 brewers. While most participating breweries are in the U.S., the fest also is bringing international attention with five international breweries participating this year.

Beyond that Denver will serve as a hub for Craft Beer Week, with events happening throughout the state. While many are at breweries, others have unique locations -- like the Mighty Beer Run in Platt Park on March 26.

Contact Confluence Denver Innovation & Jobs News Editor Chris Meehan with tips and leads for future stories at chris@confluence-denver.com.


Couragion wins NSF innovation grant

Denver's Couragion has won a $150,000 National Science Foundation Innovation Research Grant to improve awareness of STEM (science, technology, engineering, and math) careers. The woman-owned education technology is focused on STEM and how education can lead to fulfilling careers.

The company says its mission is to inspire kids to pursue skills, degrees, and careers in STEM. The company has developed an app that helps users understand what careers are possible with STEM-based education. Data shows 84 percent of users are traditionally underrepresented in STEM. 

The company, which launched in 2014 is quickly expanding. The app is already being used at numerous schools in Denver and the app is available for iOS devices. Now it's working on a new project, which will be supported by the grant.

The grant aims to help improve awareness and perception of careers that require science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) competencies. People who may be in the best position to influence children might expose children to certain bias when discussing potential career pathways. "If kids understood the opportunities, they could pursue academic pathways to amass skills that better prepare them to enter the workforce," the award states.

Couragion's project will use big data, perceived capacity building, continuous STEM programming and self-reflection to create a commercialized STEM career and self-discovery application and companion data visualization tool. "Career exploration and readiness focused on helping individuals select rewarding and suitable degrees, training, and careers will increase the likelihood that individuals stay in those careers, exhibit greater creativity, and decrease the number of people who invest in education they never use," the company says in a statement.

Contact Confluence Denver Innovation & Jobs News Editor Chris Meehan with tips and leads for future stories at chris@confluence-denver.com.


Recycle a computer, create a job through Hope Tank

Recycle 16 computers in one day and create job. That's the latest project from Hope Tank, launched Jan. 4, to recycle 16 computers every day in January. That's enough work to create a job at local organizations Blue Star Recyclers and PCs for People. Both nonprofits create jobs for people with disabilities and provide refurbished computers to low-income people.

It's an ideal time, the season of giving might be over, but people can still be beneficial, by recycling their old computers to others who can get great benefit for them. "Many of us, especially after the holidays, have computers that have become outdated and we just hold onto them because we don't know what to do with them and we're nervous about the data that is on them being protected," says Hope Tank Owner and Founder Erika Righter.

Blue Star Recyclers has already ethically recycled over 8 million pounds of e-waste, diverted more than 230,000 pounds of hazardous materials from landfills while providing above minimum-wage employment for 26 adults with autism and other disabilities. It's also creating $800,000 in taxpayer savings by reducing Social Security payments to those with disabilities.

"These guys will wipe all the data, and give the computer either an environmentally respectful 'end of life,' or they will give it a whole new life, provide employment for people with barriers, and help those who most need computers in our community," Righter says.

Hope Tank is a local retail store that's dedicated to positive change. A portion of the price for each item purchased in the store benefits a non-profit and many goods in the store are made by local artists or nonprofits. These nonprofits range from veteran's groups like the Art of War, to the Wild Animal Sanctuary to Colorado AIDS Project and a wide variety of other groups.

Righter says that the partners in the project are indicative of partnerships she wants to create going forward. "Blue Star Recyclers is one of our designated charities. Our customers have asked for opportunities to have deeper impact. This is a fun way to do that." Such partnerships can raise awareness of the issue and give the public more ways to become more beneficial to society at large. In this case helping those with disabilities see gainful employment and a living wage.

Contact Confluence Denver Innovation & Jobs News Editor Chris Meehan with tips and leads for future stories at chris@confluence-denver.com.


The Whole Works takes The Wright award for 2015

On Oct. 20, SPACE Gallery hosted the annual Wright awards from Something Independent celebrating the intersection of lifestyle and leadership. The Whole Works won the 2015 Wright and the $5,000 award that came with it.

The annual event, organized by Denver's Something Independent, focuses on identifying companies that are exhibiting leadership at the intersection of lifestyle and commerce. The Whole Works, a new clothing production facility in Rifle, won the award this year. The company works with customers, including Colorado's Voormi, to produce products as needed.

"As one of the first public benefit corporations in the state, we are focused on making a social impact by partnering with a job preparation program that teaches production sewing to women who are transitioning from federal assistance," the company said in a statement.

Thanks to its operating model, the company said it is able to promise shorter turnaround times on projects and produce smaller volumes of orders. It's a selling point as more companies are looking to re-shore manufacturing in the U.S.

This year's other finalists for The Wright were ReActive Adaptations, which makes off-road handcycles and downhill machines and The Public Works, a Denver-based design, fabrication and multimedia marketing firm.

The event had fully 125 applicants in 2015. Judges winnowed the number down to 10, then three and finally chose the winner.

Contact Confluence Denver Innovation & Jobs News Editor Chris Meehan with tips and leads for future stories at chris@confluence-denver.com.


fishpond becomes B Corp

Denver's fishpond recently became a B Corporation. The company designs fly fishing, outdoor adventure packs, vests, gear bags, luggage and other accessories. Among other innovations, the company has created Cyclepond, a fabric made from recycling commercial fishing nets.

As a B Corp, fishpond is required to meet certain social and environmental standards. This includes considering the impacts of the company's decisions on employees, suppliers, communities, consumers and the environment. While becoming a B Corp or Beneficial Corporation is a voluntary act for a for-profit company, it ensures that the company meets these standards by including the requirements in its bylaws.

"As a small fly fishing focused brand, it is very important to communicate to our employees, consumers and industry that our business is dedicated to making sustainable decisions affecting everyone involved," explains co-owner Ben Kurtz. "Joining Patagonia in the fly fishing industry as the only other manufacturer with this certification means a great deal to us and will undoubtedly mean more to our loyal consumers."

Among the factors cited in allowing fishpond to become a B Corp, the certifying organization noted Cyclepond, the company's advocacy in Washington, D.C., to protect water and sustainable fishing practices and its donations to non-profits through partnerships and product sales.

"Since fishpond's inception, we have strived to be leaders in sustainable practices and creating a workplace in which our employees can thrive," says John Le Coq, fishpond founder and lead designer. "Becoming a certified B Corp tells our industry and our consumers that they are aiding a company that deeply cares about the environment and social responsibility on a large scale."

In becoming a B Corp it joins more than 50 other companies in Colorado that have become B Corps. The certification, according to the company, will also allow it access to a like-minded community of business owners to continually drive positive progress.

Contact Confluence Denver Innovation & Jobs News Editor Chris Meehan with tips and leads for future stories at chris@confluence-denver.com.


PaintCare launches statewide paint recycling program

Too many people have leftover paint after repainting their home or apartment. This stuff usually sits around until it can't be used anymore or ends up in the dump -- which is not good since paints can leach toxic materials into the ground. But last year Gov. John Hickenlooper signed legislation into law requiring paint recycling. Now, through the free paint recycling program, PaintCare, Coloradans are able to recycle the paint hiding behind the stairs, in the basement or in the garage -- for free!

PaintCare was set up by paint manufacturers as a way to mitigate paint waste. The organization says that more than half of the materials handled by household hazardous waste facilities is paint.


There are already nearly 50 paint drop-off locations in the Denver area, and the organization already has more than 100 locations throughout Colorado. Many of these are at hardware and paint stores

"We are thrilled to see the excitement and energy from Colorado retailers to become paint drop-off sites," says Paul Fresina, PaintCare's director of communications. "Before the program was implemented, many people didn't have any easy way to get rid of their unwanted paint, but now Coloradans have the option to simply drop off paint at a PaintCare retail partner near them for recycling."

The legislation signed by Hickenlooper doesn't require a fee for recycling. However, Coloradans are already paying to recycle paint when they purchase it. That's because the legislation imposed a small fee on the purchase of paint. For instance, a five-gallon bucket of paint carries a $1.60 fee to handle recycling.

Once the paint is collected PaintCare processes it into a number of things. Some is remixed into recycled-content paint, used as fuel or made into other products or. In some case, when paint is unrecyclable, PaintCare dries it out and disposes of it. Visit www.paintcare.org to learn more.

Contact Confluence Denver Innovation & Jobs News Editor Chris Meehan with tips and leads for future stories at chris@confluence-denver.com.


Laws Whiskey House introduces Secale, a Colorado-sourced rye whiskey

When Laws Whiskey House opened publicly last year, the company introduced a complex bottle called A.D. Laws Four Grain Bourbon using corn, wheat, rye and barley. Now it is introducing two more offerings in A.D. Laws Secale Straight Rye Whiskey Married Batch 1 and A.D. Laws Secale Straight Rye Whiskey Single Barrel Cask Strength, both of which are unique in using rye grown on a family farm in the San Luis Valley and malted in Colorado.

When Laws introduced the four-grain bourbon last year, it turned heads. Bucking trends of many startup distilleries, namesake Al Laws and head distiller Jake Norris, Stranahan's first distiller, worked under the name Project Gargoyle and waited  nearly three years to introduce a whiskey distilled and aged in Colorado, rather than use imported spirits or distilling other spirits like vodka or rum while the whiskey aged. Now the company is introducing a rye whiskey that it's already aged for three years.

The rye in the whiskey is harvested fresh, cleaned and malted by the Colorado Malting Company, within a week of harvest, according to Laws. Quickly thereafter, it's delivered to the distillery where it's cooked and open-air fermented to lock in the fresh flavor.

The married batch is 100 proof (or 50 percent alcohol -- many whiskeys are barreled much lower proofs like 80 proof) and sells for $78 a bottle. The single-barrel rye is poured from "the cream" -- the first half of the first 10 casks and -- is bottled at cask strength: an average of 139 proof. It's selling for $110 a bottle.

Contact Confluence Denver Innovation & Jobs News Editor Chris Meehan with tips and leads for future stories at chris@confluence-denver.com.


Bear Creek Distillery wins awards with unique take on noble spirits

Just off Broadway in the Overland neighborhood, Bear Creek Distillery is a new operation -- its whiskeys haven't even had a full year to age yet -- but its spirits are already winning awards.

In March, Bear Creek Distillery won three awards at the Denver International Spirits Competition, an event that attracted companies as big as Beam Suntory (makers of Jim Beam and its family of products). But Bear Creek took home the gold in the Vodka Potato category with its 100 percent Wheat Vodka, and two silvers in the Vodka Rye and Rum White categories.

"Our vodkas are sort of unique because we make grain-specific vodka," explains co-founder Jay Johnson. "Typically a vodka off the shelf you'll find are mixed grain or potato. Potato vodkas are relatively common. It is relatively uncommon to find a vodka that is 100 percent wheat or 100 percent rye," he says of the award-winning spirits.

The Silver Rum, which isn't aged, also won an award at the show. "Rum is easy to make. It's ingredients are easy to clean up, you can get it bottled within a month," Johnson says. In fact, vodka is harder to make because it has to be distilled to such a high proof. "It has a to be 190 proof," he says.

These spirits are just the start for the nascent distillery. "We hope to release our Silver Rum that has been aged in used Wild Turkey barrels, and then we also do a house-infused spiced rum," Johnson explains. "We mirror our vodka with a rye whiskey that we hope to have available by the holidays or in the beginning of the year for our tasting room. That goes the same for our wheat whiskey. Our bourbon probably won't ready until 2017."

That's because of the nature of spirits like whiskey. They don't have a set completion date and need to mature at their own pace. While some distillers are importing spirits from other states to age or blend here in Colorado, that's not the case with Bear Creek.

"We do everything grain to glass right here in our facility off Broadway," Johnson says. "I understand the lure of it doing it the other way . . . but we do things as genuinely as possible, so we're going to bite the bullet and battle father time until the bourbon is ready and the whiskey is as well. In my opinion, that's the right way to do things."

Since it's so new, the distillery doesn't yet have extensive retail distribution, but the tasting room is just the place for quaffs and cocktails. "For all intents and purposes, it's a bar, but we can only serve liquor with things that we've made," Johnson says. That means no store-bought bitters, cordials or vermouth. "We have to get really creative with fresh juices and herbs and things like that. We've gotten really good at recreating cocktails with things that we're allowed to use."

The tasting room is open from Thursday to Saturday. During the rest of the week, Johnson and the crew are busy making more spirits and tending to those that are aging.

Contact Confluence Denver Innovation & Jobs News Editor Chris Meehan with tips and leads for future stories at chris@confluence-denver.com.

Black Project Spontaneous Ales debuts two wild ales

There are open fermentation beers, then there are wild beers, that's what Black Project Spontaneous Ales is into, letting its beers be inoculated purely by the wild yeasts and microbes that travel in the air, creating beers that are wholly unique in flavor. As of Feb. 15 from Former Future Brewing Company, the Black Project's wild beers are available in bottles for the first time.

"We expose our wort while still boiling, to the outside air to cool overnight on our roof," says James Howat, co-founder of Former Future and Black Project. "The next morning we put this wort into a barrel or other closed-top vessel and wait for fermentation to start." It can sometimes take four to 10 days for the very small amount of microbes from the air to multiply to a point where the wort is actually being fermented at an appreciable level, he adds, "so our beers are made via open, spontaneous inoculation but closed fermentation."

While these types of beer are produced in Belgium and the U.K. and have been for centuries, there aren't many breweries in the U.S. making them. "To my knowledge, we are the only brewery in Colorado to release a beer made using a coolship and completely spontaneous fermentation," Howat says. The coolship is the open vessel designed to allow the wort to cool and be inoculated by the air at a certain rate.

"Finding out what a small population of wild-caught microbes are going to do with a wort I design is truly my favorite part of brewing and is essentially why Black Project exists," Howat says. "Beers that we intend to eventually sell year-round we can blend and do a variety of things to make sure that the beers are always pretty similar, but even then there will be difference."

The company, a side project of Former Future, has already made a buzz. It debuted Flyby, its coolship spontaneous sour ale, at the Great American Beer Festival in October 2014 and won a bronze medal in the wild ale category. On Sun. Feb. 15, the young company is selling that as well as Jumpseat, a dry-hopped wild ale, at 2 p.m. at Former Future (1290 S. Broadway).

Only 48 750-milliliter bottles of Flyby are available at $35 a bottle, and 120 bottles of Jumpseat are available at $22 a bottle. "These beers are taking an average of 6 months to be ready," Howat says. "So we can't just make more right away just because the demand is so insane," he explains.

The nascent company, which started brewing in February 2014, is already preparing to expand. Howat says there will be as many as five releases between March and September, two with about 2,500 bottles and the others will be in the triple-digit range.

Given the experimental nature of coolship brewing -- 20 percent of the barrels could fail -- and the lengthy time it takes to brew the beer, Howat says he's thinking five years ahead to keep up with future demand.

Contact Confluence Denver Innovation & Jobs News Editor Chris Meehan with tips and leads for future stories at chris@confluence-denver.com.

Denver's COjacks offer alternative currency for gifts

COjacks, the Denver-based, Colorado-centric currency that launched late this summer, will be accepted along with U.S currency at the Community Connect Trade Association and Main Street Chamber of West Denver's Holiday Trade Show and Event at SPACE Gallery at 400 Santa Fe Dr. on Thurs. Nov. 20 from 4 to 8 p.m.

"The event is about 50 percent trade and 50 percent cash," explains Jaime Cangemi, chief marketing officer for the Main Street Chamber in Denver. Cangemi says she expects about 50 vendors and 500 buyers.

Instead of being confined to cash, however, the event allows people to barter or trade for locally made goods. It's also an ideal opportunity for an alternative currency like COjacks. "Their hope is for us to roll it out to the Community Connect Trade members there," Cangemi says.

Consumers can get COjacks at an introductory rate of five for $4. The retailers that accept COjacks, among them Backstage Coffee and The GrowHaus accept them at a rate equivalent to a dollar.

"It's all about the independent businesses," Cangemi explains. "The concept is if you were a retail shop and I bought something with COjacks and you then have COjacks in possession you cannot come back to the COjacks office to trade it for cash so you'll go out and find a member of COjacks you can spend it with. That's where the dollar going further makes sense."

Pro-level businesses that accept COjacks for 30 percent or more of a customer's purchase can receive three COjacks for every $1 they choose to exchange for COjacks. Businesses that accept 10 percent of a sale in COjacks can exchange $1 for two COjacks. Since they can't trade them back for U.S. dollars, the accepting retailers must spend them with other participating retailers.

Contact Confluence Denver Innovation & Jobs News Editor Chris Meehan with tips and leads for future stories at chris@confluence-denver.com.

Find local breweries and more with CraftedHere

Want to find the nearest or newest brewery or marijuana dispensary in Colorado? Check out Denver-based Craft Boom's recently launched app, CraftedHere.

The app is available on Apple and Android devices and the information also is available via craftedhere.us.

Craft Boom CEO Chase Doelling explains that the company launched the app about a month ago and are now starting to bring attention to it after a softer launch.

"What we're hoping to capitalize on now is cannabis tourism," Doelling says. "As people come in they're mainly focussed on trying cannabis because its legal. But there are all these breweries here and all this here and you can capture all the side markets. People might not know what's around the corner from them outside of just landing in downtown and wandering close to the center of the city."

Currently the app and site cover five categories of Colorado-friendly crafts: breweries, cannabis shops, coffee shops, distilleries and wineries. Doelling says the information is populated from state records and actual experiences. Information for each brewery includes information about their awards at the Great American Beer Festival. However, instead of customer reviews, the app uses badges to rate the sites.

Also, the map-based app can show users what's nearby. "So if you're in a brewery it will tell you what's the nearest coffee shop, the closest park and going down the list," Doelling says. In the future, the Craft Boom team could cover restaurants and other points of crafty interest, he adds.

At this point, the information is only available for Colorado and users can manually submit information about new breweries through email, but can't add them to the app or site. As the user base grows, Doelling hopes to expand it to more markets to the western U.S.

Contact Confluence Denver Innovation & Jobs News Editor Chris Meehan with tips and leads for future stories at chris@confluence-denver.com.
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