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Margaret Jackson : Innovation & Job News

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Lyft Locates Driver Hub in Steam on the Platte

Rideshare company Lyft has opened a driver Hub at Steam on the Platte in Denver’s Sun Valley neighborhood.

Lyft chose Steam on the Platte for its driver support center because of its convenient access to highways and thoroughfares, as well as the development’s location in the heart of Denver.

When development firm Urban Ventures was discussing the types of tenants it wanted to locate in Steam on the Platte, words like entrepreneurial, energetic and pioneering came to mind, says Susan Powers, president of the firm.

“We love the values of Lyft,” Powers says. “We love the way you treat your drivers and customers.”

Steam on the Platte is within walking distance of the Auraria campus and the Broncos' stadium. It also is at the intersection of the Lakewood Gulch and Platte River bike paths and a short walk to two light-rail stations at Decatur-Federal and West Auraria.

Urban Ventures and White Construction Group formed a partnership to acquire the property in 2014 from the estate of the late Englewood-based real estate agent Arvin Weiss. At the time of the acquisition, there were two illegal marijuana grows operating and the Evil Souls motorcycle gang had taken over one of the buildings as its clubhouse.

Urban Ventures and White have since created a mixed-use project that has attracted several other tenants in addition to Lyft. NIMBL, a technology consulting company, moved into the space in September. Two Denver architecture firms also have moved into Steam: Olson Lavoie and Davis Wince.

Urban Ventures and White Construction have started working on the next phase of the project: converting a 6,000-square-foot former gas station with a bowstring roof into a restaurant. The other buildings on the 3.2-acre site have been demolished to make way for more office space and residential buildings.

Delta Dental leases space at Catalyst HTI

Delta Dental of Colorado is the latest healthcare company to announce it will locate at the Catalyst Health-Tech Innovation (HTI) development in Denver’s River North district.

Delta Dental will lease 2,000 square feet on the second floor of the building. The nonprofit dental insurer plans to use the space as a center for collaboration and innovation, working alongside startups and larger companies within Catalyst HTI and inviting in entrepreneurs to develop and test new concepts.

“The oral healthcare industry is seeing the development of exciting new, innovative technologies that have the potential to significantly, if not dramatically, improve patient outcomes and care,” says Helen Drexler, president and CEO of Delta Dental of Colorado. “As the state’s leading dental benefits provider, it is imperative that we’re at the forefront of these efforts and on the leading edge of developing the future or oral healthcare.”

Catalyst HTI is an “industry integrator” bringing together a full spectrum of stakeholders in healthcare. Startups will have access to potential clients and investors in established companies. The project is being jointly developed by Koelbel and Company and health-tech entrepreneur Mike Biselli and the landowners.

Delta Dental joins a growing number of health-tech startups and healthcare organizations, including Hitachi, University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus, Kaiser Permanente, American Diabetes Association, Prime Health and Medical Group Management.

“Delta Dental broadens the conversations within Catalyst HTI in important ways and expands the community’s opportunities,” Biselli says. “Delta Dental is a perfect fit for this ecosystem, both as a leading voice on the importantce of oral health and as a health and wellness company with an intense focus on innovation.”
 

Colorado Enterprise Fund gets $776,500 grant

The Colorado Enterprise Fund has received a $776,500 grant to support its small-business lending and technical assistance programs statewide.

Colorado Enterprise Fund is among seven Colorado Community Development Financial Institutions (CDFI) to receive a grant from the U.S. Department of Treasury’s Community Development Financial Institutions Fund. Other recipients include Denver -based Mercy Loan Fund, Mile High Community Loan Fund and Triple Bottom Line Foundation, as well as Aurora-based Community Enterprises Development Services. Outside of Denver, First Nations Oweesta Corp. in Longmont and La Plata Homes Fund in Durango received awards.

“We are honored to receive this funding from the CDFI Fund again this year,” says Ceyl Prinster, president and CEO of Colorado Enterprise Fund. “This award will expand our ability to finance businesses that create quality jobs, enhance long-term economic vitality and expand community prosperity to insure more residents benefit from Colorado’s robust economic growth.”

Certified as a CDFI in 1996, the Colorado Enterprise Fund received its first CDFI Fund award of $275,000 in 1997 to increase capital access for small-business owners across Colorado. Since then, Colorado Enterprise Fund has been awarded nearly $10 million to continue that work and expand its focus to increase access to healthy foods and serve more communities of color and businesses located in persistent poverty counties.

Rail~Volution conference will showcase Denver's transportation advances

Rail~Volution is coming to Denver Sept. 17-20.

The conference, hosted by the Regional Transportation District (RTD) and local partners, focuses on building livable communities through transit and multimodal investments. National leaders, planners and advocates will examine and discuss all that the Denver region has accomplished since it last served as the host city for the gathering 17 years ago.

During 25 mobile workshops and more than 75 sessions over four days, leaders and practitioners from the fields of government, transit, real estate, business, finance, environment and advocacy will explore pertinent transit issues, opportunities and challenges common to the Rocky Mountain West.

“Denver has an extraordinary story to tell about how transit investments and cross-sector collaboration have changed the economic trajectory of the regions,” says Dan Bartholomay, CEO of Rail~Volution. “The Denver community found the right mix of investments that lead to truly livable places — places that take care to ensure affordability and access to jobs, good homes and healthy lifestyles. The Denver region’s integrated approach is exactly what other cities and regions are hoping to learn about at Rail~Volution.”

Featured speakers include Colorado Gov. John Hickenlooper; Denver Mayor Michael Hancock; Peter Rogoff, CEO of Sound Transit in Seattle; Phil Washington, CEO of L.A. Metro; Oregon Congressman Earl Blumenauer; Maurice Jones, president of Local Initiatives Support Corp. in New York; Christine Marquez-Hudson, president and CEO of The Denver Foundation; and John Martin, president and CEO of the Southeastern Institute of Research Inc. in Richmond, Va.

Nursing moms now have privacy at all downtown sports venues

Nursing moms now have a quiet place to breastfeed or pump at all of Denver’s downtown pro sports venues as a result of UCHealth’s partnerships with the Colorado Rockies and Denver Broncos. 

The new Mamava nursing suites are being installed in the main concourses at Coors Field and Sports Authority Field at Mile High. UCHealth's recent purchase and installation of the air-conditioned lactation suites makes Denver the first city in the country to offer nursing suites in all downtown professional sports venues. UCHealth also purchased and installed the lactation suite located in the concourse at Pepsi Center, home to the Colorado Avalanche and Denver Nuggets.

“UCHealth’s commitment to improving lives extends beyond the doors of our hospitals and clinics,” says Manny Rodriguez, UCHealth chief marketing and experience officer. “our investment in nursing suites with our partners at all of Denver’s downtown professional sports venues makes it easier for nursing moms attending events — from games to concerts — to live extraordinary lives doing what they love, with their loved ones.”

The sports teams collaborated with UCHealth to provide the clean comfortable spaces to nurse in private. The lactation suite is a self-contained, mobile pod with comfortable benches, a fold-down table, an electrical outlet for plugging in a breast pump and a door that can be locked for privacy. The 4-foot by 8-foot pod is intended for individual use but has plenty of room for mothers with diaper bags, babies and other children in tow.

AAA moves to Tech Center; Green Solutions takes its space

AAA Colorado is relocating its corporate headquarters to the Denver Tech Center after the sale of its 63,335-square-foot office building at 4100 E. Arkansas to Denver-based Tributary Real Estate.

Tributary plans to renovate the building for The Green Solution’s (TGS) corporate office.

“At Tributary, we pride ourselves on achieving a high level of involvement in creating lasting partnerships with our clients, working closely with them to determine how our investment, development and brokerage services can be combined to support their business objectives,” says Ryan Arnold,  principal of the firm. “We’ve developed a strong relationship with TGS Management through several successful transactions over the past four years, and we look forward to continuing the relationship as TGS Management grows as an organization.”

TGS Management is a vertically integrated cannabis operations company that employs more than 660 people in cultivation, manufacturing, research and development and retail. About 125 employees will move into the new space on Arkansas.

“We’ve worked with Tributary for several years on our real estate,” says Kyle Speidell, co-founder of TGS Management. “Their commitment to understanding our short- and long-term goals and their ability to deliver solutions tailored to our unique needs has helped to propel our growth and expand our real estate holdings.”

The Green Solution currently owns 12 retail locations across Colorado and 300,000 square feet of cultivation facilities.

AAA moves to Tech Center; Green Solutions takes its space

AAA Colorado is relocating its corporate headquarters to the Denver Tech Center after the sale of its 63,335-square-foot office building at 4100 E. Arkansas to Denver-based Tributary Real Estate.

Tributary plans to renovate the building for The Green Solution’s (TGS) corporate office.

“At Tributary, we pride ourselves on achieving a high level of involvement in creating lasting partnerships with our clients, working closely with them to determine how our investment, development and brokerage services can be combined to support their business objectives,” says Ryan Arnold,  principal of the firm. “We’ve developed a strong relationship with TGS Management through several successful transactions over the past four years, and we look forward to continuing the relationship as TGS Management grows as an organization.”

TGS Management is a vertically integrated cannabis operations company that employs more than 660 people in cultivation, manufacturing, research and development and retail. About 125 employees will move into the new space on Arkansas.

“We’ve worked with Tributary for several years on our real estate,” says Kyle Speidell, co-founder of TGS Management. “Their commitment to understanding our short- and long-term goals and their ability to deliver solutions tailored to our unique needs has helped to propel our growth and expand our real estate holdings.”

The Green Solution currently owns 12 retail locations across Colorado and 300,000 square feet of cultivation facilities.

Interactive artwork unveiled at Levitt Pavilion

The latest addition to the city of Denver’s public art collection was dedicated July 20 as part of the grand opening celebration for the newly built Levitt Pavilion Denver at Ruby Hill Park.

“Sky Song” by Colorado artists Nick Geurts and Ryan Elmendorf is a two-part interactive sculpture that blends light and sound through interaction with the viewer and even the sky above. 

Comprised of mirror-polished stainless steel, “Sky Song” invites viewers to create music by pressing any combination of 33 buttons on an eight-foot-tall sculpture on the plaza. The kiosk is linked to its companion piece 30 feet away on the building’s facade. During concerts at Levitt Pavilion, the interactive function transitions from sound to light. With 25 lights and bells, “Sky Song” is an engaging public artwork.

The Levitt Pavilion is programmed, managed and supported by Friends of Levitt Paviolion Denver, a local nonprofit dedicated to building community through music. 

Upcoming concerts include:
  • July 23: The Stone Foxes
  • Aug. 3: The Suffers
  • Aug. 4: John Fulbright
  • Aug. 5: The Reminders co-headline with Fed Rez
  • Aug. 6: Rocky Dawuni with the Bunny Gang
  • Aug. 9: Hippo Campus with Slow Caves and Corsicana
  • Aug. 10: The Dustbowl Revival with Charley Crockett
  • Aug. 13: The Band of Heathens with Blake Brown & The American Dust Choir
  • Aug. 17 The Haunted Windchimes and Edison
  • Aug. 18: My Body Sings Electric and Chemistry Club
  • Aug. 19: Smooth Hound Smith with Anthony Ruptak & The Midnight Friends
  • Aug. 24: Gaby Moreno
  • Aug. 25: Mariachi Sol de Mi Tierra with Fiesta Colorado Dance Company
  • Aug. 26: Karl Denson’s Tiny Universe
  • Aug. 27: New Breed Brass Band with Denver Municipal Band
  • Aug. 30: Ripe with Chris Daniels & the Kings with Freddi Gowdy
  • Aug. 31: Inspector with Izcalli
The public is invited to bring their picnic blankets and lawn chairs to the free concerts. There also will be a handful of ticketed shows featuring artists like UB40 and 311.

Denver is nation's seventh-greenest city

For the fourth consecutive year, Denver has ranked among the top 10 U.S. cities for the percentage of its office space qualified as green certified, according to a recent survey by energy consultants CBRE and Maastricht University.

With a modest year-over-year improvement, 13.3 percent of Denver office buildings are certified green, representing 41.9 percent of overall office square footage, according to the annual Green Building Adoption Index. That’s compared with 11.8 percent and 40.2 percent, respectively, last year.

Chicago claimed the top spot in 2017, while San Francisco slipped to second and Atlanta, Houston and Minneapolis rounded out the top five markets.

“Green” office buildings in the United States are defined as those that hold either an EPA Energy Star label, U.S. Green Building Council LEED certification or both.

“Denver companies are savvy, and they realize that operating out of an energy-efficient space can not only save money and benefit the environment but also be a point of differentiation when it comes to attracting and retaining the best talent,” says Sam DePizzol, executive vice president with CBRE Advisory & Transaction Services in Denver. “With one of the tightest labor markets in the country, we are seeing more and more Colorado companies pay attention to the role their real estate places in creating a competitive advantage.”
 
9 Margaret Jackson Articles | Page:
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