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Eight showrooms sign on to IDC Building

When The IDC Building opens early next year, it will house up to 15 of the metro area’s top home-design showrooms in 60,000 square feet at 590 Quivas St.

The showrooms will offer a variety of products and services an a range of styles from modern to contemporary and traditional to transitional. Each showroom was chosen for its unique product selection and the value they bring to trade professionals and homeowners alike.

“Gone are the days of the traditional design center model with exclusivity only to the trade and doors and walls between every showroom,” says Al Castelo, head developer of IDC. “When creating The IDC Building concept, my team and I visited major design centers around the country and discovered the demand for a more experiential retail model. We chose to build a community at IDC and create an accessible environment that encourages partners, homeowners and the trade to collaborate.”

So far, eight showrooms have signed onto to be part of The IDC Building:
  • Aztec Carpet & Rug
  • Benjamin Moore
  • Classy Closets
  • Custom Concrete Prep & Polish
  • Inspire Kitchen Design
  • Lolo Rugs & Gifts
  • T&G Flooring
  • Ultra Design Center
The functional displays will allow visitors to experience how products will look and work in their own homes.

The building was a collective effort designed by architect Hartronft Associates and developed and owned by Tri-West Companies.
 

Colorado Enterprise Fund to participate in CO Impact Days

Colorado Enterprise Fund is among the 100 social ventures seeking “impact investments” that was chosen to meet with investors at CO Impact Days Social Venture Showcase Nov. 17.

The 100 ventures will convene at the Ellie Caulkins Opera House for the second year of the “shark-tank for good” statewide marketplace for impact investing. The selected social ventures will showcase their investment opportunities to offer not only a financial return on the impact investor’s investment but also to offer solutions to some of the most pressing issues of our time.”

“We are so thrilled to again invite more than 200 investors and philanthropists to interact with these valuable social ventures,” says Dr. Stephanie Gripne, founder of the Impact Finance Center and creator of the CO Impact Days. “When these two groups of powerful movers and shakers share a room, there is no telling the good that will come. We’ve aimed to offer a diverse array of impact investments, with a goal that every investor will leave knowing that deal flow is not a Colorado impact investing problem.”

The goal of CO Impact Days is to catalyze $100 million in impact investments into Colorado social ventures in the next three years, and it is kicking off with CO Impact Days Nov. 15-17. The initiative is possible because Colorado is home to a number of national leaders in impact investing and a thriving and collaborative community of social venture entrepreneurs in both the for-profit and nonprofit sectors, as well as philanthropists and investors who are committed to growing Colorado’s economy and creating good jobs.

“Funding from these impact investors will enable us to serve more Colorado businesses, which in turn will ultimately advance economic opportunity and prosperity in our Colorado communities,” says Ceyl Prinster, president and CEO of Colorado Enterprise Fund.
 

Broker's buyer bonus: Helping to send a child to school in Uganda

Denver real estate broker Tenzin Gyaltsen is helping put Ugandan children through school one home sale at a time through a partnership with the S.O.U.L Foundation.

One child will be put through school for every home sale that’s over $300,000. It costs about $1,600 to put a child through all seven years of primary school.

“That gives them all of their school books and one meal per day,” said Gyaltsen, a broker associate with Coldwell Banker Residential Brokerage in Colorado. “It’s an added bonus to the house. It almost personifies it in a way.”

Gyaltsen, who formerly owned an eco-friendly clothing company, met representatives from S.O.U.L (Supporting Opportunities for Ugandans to Learn) at an event and fell in love with the organization. He had a desire to do something philanthropic, so he sponsored Rita Naigaga, the first of many students.

When he turned his attention to real estate he decided to expand his efforts by sponsoring a child with proceeds from every house he lists for more than $300,000.

Gyaltsen works with investors to buy houses, fix them up and resell them. When he has an upcoming listing he contacts S.O.U.L to pledge to sponsor a student, The organization then sends a child’s photo and bio, which will be framed and displayed in the house. If the new owners wish, the address of the newly sold home stays with the sponsorship, and all the letters and updates from the student are mailed to the house.

“Lack of education is one of the biggest problems in the world,” Gyaltsen said. “In this part of the world, most children don’t get an education. It’s important to equip children with knowledge so they can go out and better the world and their communities.”

The Bindery opens in LoHi

Chef Linda Hampsten Fox has opened The Bindery, a culinary concept modeled after European marketplaces where diners can shop for handcrafted products, grab a gourmet lunch to go or enjoy a chic fine dining experience all in one space.

Located in the recently opened Centric LoHi apartment complex in Denver’s Lower Highland neighborhood, The Bindery will offer options for breakfast lunch and dinner, seven days a week, as well as catering services.

“The Bindery is a culmination of everything I’ve done and provides the perfect platform to share my passion for the craft of cooking sustainable, local food rooted in my personal history and heritage,” says Hampsten Fox.

Hampsten Fox searched for years for a space large enough to accommodate the multifaceted experience. At just over 4,000 square feet, The Bindery welcomes visitors with a mix of modern style and old-world charm.

The marketplace, which surrounds the bakery/cafe, will offer a mix of seasonal products made in-house, including house Bindery Sriracha (referred to as Bindaracha), smoked maple syrup, cardamom pear butter and habanero tomato jam.

“Our customers lead busy lives, and they want options: to stay or go, be casual or be served, to snack or feast,” Hampsten Fox says. “Our goal is to provide them with convenient, high-quality choices.”

The main dining room focuses on meats and recipes borrowed from her Polish-Czech heritage, as well as the many years she spent cooking in Italy. The menu has a blend of shared plates, salads, homemade pastas and hearty main dishes.

“We hope to serve as a neighborhood hub where fresh food, bold flavors and exceptional service are our hallmarks,” Hampsten Fox says.

The Confluence apartments open in new Denver high-rise

The Confluence, a 35-story apartment building in the Central Platte Valley, has officially opened.

It’s the first venture into the Denver market for developers PMRG and National Real Estate Advisors.

“We’re very excited to contribute to the positive growth taking place in this vibrant city,” says Bryant Nail, PMRG’s executive vice president of multi-family development. “We have an outstanding track record with similar properties in other parts of the country, and we’re pleased to make The Confluence one of our most recent additions to our portfolio.”

Designed by GDA Architects, the building’s amenities include a heated outdoor pool and hot tub on a large deck overlooking Confluence Park; cabanas with individual fire pits; master grilling stations; skyline lounges with NanaWall Systems; a professional chef’s kitchen and catering facility; a fitness center; gated, underground parking; a maintenance center for bikes and skis; direct access to Confluence Park; ground-floor retail; and a 24-hour front desk attendant.

All apartments have blackout shades; hand-scraped hardwood floors; gourmet kitchens with granite countertops and full-height backsplashes; designer porcelain tile in spa-style baths; walk-in closets; private terraces; and a washer and dryer in each unit. Some apartments have adjustable bookshelves and direct elevator access.

“The Confluence is in keeping with National’s investment strategy to develop build-to-core projects in America’s most dynamic urban locations, providing vanguard amenities and distinctive design for our tenants,” says Jeffrey Kanne, National’s president and CEO.
 

The Confluence apartments open in new Denver high-rise

The Confluence, a 35-story apartment building in the Central Platte Valley, has officially opened.

It’s the first venture into the Denver market for developers PMRG and National Real Estate Advisors.

“We’re very excited to contribute to the positive growth taking place in this vibrant city,” says Bryant Nail, PMRG’s executive vice president of multi-family development. “We have an outstanding track record with similar properties in other parts of the country, and we’re pleased to make The Confluence one of our most recent additions to our portfolio.”

Designed by GDA Architects, the building’s amenities include a heated outdoor pool and hot tub on a large deck overlooking Confluence Park; cabanas with individual fire pits; master grilling stations; skyline lounges with NanaWall Systems; a professional chef’s kitchen and catering facility; a fitness center; gated, underground parking; a maintenance center for bikes and skis; direct access to Confluence Park; ground-floor retail; and a 24-hour front desk attendant.

All apartments have blackout shades; hand-scraped hardwood floors; gourmet kitchens with granite countertops and full-height backsplashes; designer porcelain tile in spa-style baths; walk-in closets; private terraces; and a washer and dryer in each unit. Some apartments have adjustable bookshelves and direct elevator access.

“The Confluence is in keeping with National’s investment strategy to develop build-to-core projects in America’s most dynamic urban locations, providing vanguard amenities and distinctive design for our tenants,” says Jeffrey Kanne, National’s president and CEO.
 

Tiny homes village for homeless receives final donation

Denver’s first tiny home village has received the final donation it needs to close out funding for the project, which has been designed as an alternative solution to the problem of homelessness.

LivWell Cares, the philanthropic and community engagement arm of one of the country’s leading cannabis companies, provided $10,000 toward Beloved Community Village. The project is being developed by the Colorado Village Collaborative, a community organization founded by members of Denver Homeless Out Loud, The Interfaith Alliance of Colorado, Beloved Community Mennonite Church and residents of the Beloved Community Village.

“We are extremely grateful to LivWell Cares for stepping up to give us the finances to complete this much-needed project,” says Cole Chandler, organizer for Colorado Village Collaborative. “We need a solution to homelessness beyond shelters, emergency rooms and jails, and thanks to LivWell Cares, our Beloved Community Village residents can now take back their lives and their dignity.”

Designed to help address the twin crises of homelessness and an extreme housing shortage, Beloved Community Village includes 11 8-foot by 12-foot shelters, as well as a communal kitchen, bathroom and shower facilities on land leased from the Urban Land Conservancy at 38th and Walnut streets. In July, 14 previously homeless residents moved into the new village, where they have been able to rediscover talents, renew their purpose and restore their dignity.

“When I was told about this development, I immediately recognized its potential to help address a serious issue facing our communities,” says Michael Lord, LivWell Enlightened Health’s director of business development and founder of LivWell Cares. “LivWell Cares could not be prouder to be involved in such a worthy project.”
 

Brisk condo sales prompt end to project's first phase of sales

The Laurel Cherry Creek condominium project is selling so well that the development and sales team are ending the first phase of sales on Nov. 30, giving interested buyers a limited time to buy a residence at current pricing and the opportunity to select their own finishes.

A second phase of sales for the high-rise condos will be announced during the first quarter next year.

“The level of interest has not only been high for Laurel Cherry Creek, but so has the sales pace, which is the reason we’re going to suspend sales during the holidays and announce a re-release in 2018,” says Dawn Raymond of The Kentwood Co. and the exclusive listing broker for the project. “Interested buyers still have a few weeks to act and finalize their purchase. Otherwise, we expect to see a new rush of interest and sales when we commence our sales efforts early next year.”

Residences have private balconies or terraces with glass railings; natural gas BBQ service and hose bibs on the balconies; linear gas fireplaces; 10-foot, 8-inch ceilings throughout the living areas; porcelain tile flooring in all bathrooms and laundry; and looped-wool carpet in all bedrooms.

“We have designed and built Laurel Cherry Creek to be the preeminent residential address in Cherry Creek, where owners will enjoy upscale, maintenance-free living in one of the most sought-after neighborhoods in the United States,” says Paul Powers, president of Pauls Corp., which is developing the project.

First residents move into Centric LoHi

The first residents of Centric LoHi have started moving into the 302-unit apartment complex at 18th Street and Central Avenue in Denver’s Lower Highland neighborhood.

Developed by Nashville-based Southern Land Co., Centric LoHi will broaden the mix of units available in the neighborhood, offering 42 studios, 50 efficiencies, 140 one-bedroom apartments and 70 two-bedroom units. Rents start at $1,480 a month.

“We're thrilled to be in the Denver market and to be able to showcase the commitment to high-quality development our company is known for,” says Cindy DeFrancesco, senior vice president of Southern Land. “Centric LoHi is the perfect community for residents who want upgraded amenities and easy access to all Denver has to offer.”

Amenities at the complex include a resort-style saltwater pool and hot tub, 24-hour fitness center and an on-site pet grooming salon. There are also courtyards, a club room, game room and wine lounge, as well as a rooftop deck overlooking downtown Denver.

The mixed-use community includes 9,300 square feet of restaurant space, including The Bindery, a new concept from local chef Linda Hampsten Fox, and Marcella’s, an upscale Italian cafe. Both are scheduled to open this fall.

The real numbers: Center city neighborhoods add housing, but is it affordable?

Denver is on track to meet a goal set in 2007 to add 18,000 housing units in the city center by 2027.

The center city has seen an increase of 10,000 residential units since 2010, and another nearly 9,000 are under construction, according to the Downtown Denver Partnership’s Center City Housing report.

Even so, the units added have not been enough to keep housing costs affordable for some residents and workers.

“The Downtown Denver Partnership has advanced a variety of solutions to stem the impact of rising housing costs, ad we are focused on addressing the need for diversity in housing type and affordability to meet the needs for downtown’s workforce,” says Tami Door, president and CEO of the partnership. “While our residential and employee populations are growing at unprecedented rates, we must ensure companies can continue to attract and retain the employees they need to be successful, and affordable housing is a key part of the equation.”

The partnership has led several strategic housing initiatives, including advocating for construction defects reform, working with developers to add a variety of unit types and endorsing the creation of the first affordable housing fund in the City and County of Denver. The partnership also played a key role in moving the LIVE Denver program forward.

Other insights from the report include:
  • Denver’s center city neighborhoods are home to 79,367 residents and 130,227 employees
  • Since 2010, the center city has added 15,877 new residents and 33,065 new jobs
  • Denver is the fourth fastest growing city in the United States, and the demand to live in the center city is high, with the residential population tripling since 2000
  • Capitol Hill is the most populous center city neighborhood with a population of 17,142 residents
  • The Central Platte Valley neighborhood adjacent to Denver Union Station experienced the highest percentage of population growth since 2010
  • The Central Platte Valley neighborhood also added the most new units since 2010, totaling 5,669 units completed or under construction, more than 3,800 more units than the next busiest neighborhood for development, River North.

Red Owl apartments bring new residences to the evolving West Wash Park neighborhood

Red Owl, a 46-unit apartment project in West Wash Park, is ready to welcome tenants.

The project includes lofts and townhome style units on South Logan Street between Ellsworth and Bayaud.

“We wanted to respect the scale and rhythm of the neighborhood, so we ended up with a composition that gives every unit useable and functional outdoor space,” says Chris Fulenwider, president of CF Studio Architecture + Development, architect and co-developer of the project. “We also emphasized energy efficiency using passive elements like large windows, outdoor circulation and overhangs, which not only result in lower energy use but also become part of the character of the building.”

Red Owl was named after the old grocery store of the same name on the adjoining lot, which recently was transformed into the Alchemy Co-Working Space.

“We took one look at the old Red Owl grocery warehouse and knew we could creatively repurpose the space as opposed to demolishing the classic barrel-roofed structure, giving it a new life,” Fulenwider says.

Alchemy opened in early September and already has attracted nearly a dozen companies. As part of its emphasis on wellness, the first floor of Alchemy also houses the newest expansion location for the Endorphin fitness studio.

“Chris and I wanted to create an authentic co-working space in the neighborhood that emphasized work-life balance and matched the positive entrepreneurial spirit of the city,” says Travis McAfoos, co-developer of the project.
 

Oakwood Homes takes over Reunion development

Oakwood Homes has taken over as the master developer of Reunion, a 2,500-acre community in northeast Denver that is currently home to nearly 2,000 families.

Under terms of the agreement, Denver-based L.C. Fulenwider Inc. will continue to maintain ownership of the community while the master plan development transitions from Shea Homes to Oakwood.

“I am excited by the transition and know that Reunion and its residents will benefit from Oakwood Homes’ expertise in developing and implementing community-focused master plans,” says Cal Fulenwider, CEO of Fulenwider. “Shea Homes has been a tremendous partner in the initial development of Reunion, and I am confident that Oakwood Homes will be excellen stewards of the future expansion of this wonderful community.”

Oakwood’s plans for Reunion include additional residences, an active 50-plus adult community, enhancing educational opportunities for children and creating additional neighborhood amenities.

Originally established in 2001 as a Shea Homes Master Planned Community, Reunion encompasses more than 900 acres of mixed-use and commercial development within Commerce City. It houses a 21,000-square-foot recreation center, 152 acres of parks, an 18-hole golf course, 10 miles of trails, 8 acres of lakes and an adjacent grocery store and other retail amenities. Oakwood Homes is one of four home builders in the community and is currently building the 2017 St. Jude Dream Home in Reunion.

“Our mission is to create luxury homes that are accessible and customizable at every budget and stage of life,” says Pat Hamill, founder and CEO of Oakwood. “We will complement the existing personality of Reunion by creating community gathering spots for residents, expanding educational options for children and building quality homes that reflect the existing look and feel of community.”

Affordable housing news: Proposals sought for Five Points condo project

A new mixed-income condo project is planned for Five Points. 

The Denver Office of Economic Development and the Regional Transportation District are seeking a development partner to build a transit-oriented, mixed-income condo project on an RTD-owned parcel at the northern corner of 29th and Welton streets. A request for qualifications (RFQ) will be issued beginning Aug. 15.

A portion of the condos will be priced to be affordable for income-qualified buyers earning 80 percent of the area median income (AMI), which is $47,000 for a one-person household or $67,100 for a four-person household. the development also may include commercial space such as retail on its ground floor. 

OED has entered into an option agreement with RTD for the purchase of the site, which it intends to assign to the selected development team. The .43-acre site is located within the Five Points Historic Cultural District and the Welton Corridor Urban Redevelopment Area. The site’s zoning allows for construction of a five-story, mixed-use building. 

A pre-bid meeting will be held from 3 to 4:30 p.m. Aug. 23 at the Blair-Caldwell African American Research Library, 2401 Welton St. The deadline to submit RFQ entries is Oct. 17.

 

Four artists selected for SkyHouse installations

The Denver Art Museum and SkyHouse Denver are teaming up to transform a downtown corner into an urban art gallery featuring the work of four local artists over the course of a year. 

After completing a request for proposals process, the DAM, in consultation with RedLine, selected four Denver-based artists — Sandra Fettingis, Collin Parson, Jodi Stuart and Suchitra Mattai — to create installations that will be on view in the street-level window boxes along 18th Avenue and Lincoln Boulevard at SkyHouse Denver, a high-rise apartment building at 1776 Broadway. Fettingis and Parson’s installations were mounted in June and will be on view through October. Stuart and Mattai will take over the space in December and occupy it for six months.

“This collaboration activates our building in a unique and engaging way, while giving the museum and Denver-based artists and opportunity to reach more people,” says Sharon O’Connell, senior regional vice president of Simpson Housing, which developed and manages SkyHouse. “One of the reasons we chose this site in particular was the proximity to many of downtown Denver’s key attractions, including the Denver Art Museum. Our residents want to live, work and play in unique urban environments. This partnership is a perfect fit.”

SkyHouse Denver opened in September last year. the 26-story, 354-unit mixed-use building offers studio, one- and two-bedroom apartments, as well as street-level retail space that currently includes Superfruit Republic and MECHA Fitness.

Perry Row at Sloans model opens

Perry Row at Sloans is opening its model home this month and welcoming its first homeowners to the community. 

The model, located at 1569 N. Perry St., provides all the features and amenities found in the Perry Row at Sloans homes.

The three-bedroom home features an open floor plan, custom kitchen and baths by Caruso Kitchens of Denver, outdoor living spaces on all three floors, including a 700-square-foot rooftop patio with views of the mountains, downtown skyline and Sloans Lake Park, and a ground-floor mud room and private library.

More than half of the homes at Perry Row have already sold. The final phase of 16 homes will be released later this summer.

Prices for Perry Row townhomes, located in the Sloans district at the former St. Anthony Hospital site, range from the low $500,000s to more than $800,000. The floor plans range in size from about 1,400 to 2,200 square feet. Designed and built by Sprocket Design-Build, the residences will feature two-car garages, rooftop decks and a brownstone-style architecture.

The project is a block south of Sloans Lake Park, featuring a three-mile jogging trail, the city’s largest lake with a marina and water sport activities and plentiful open space.
223 Housing Articles | Page: | Show All
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