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Craft makers open up shop in North Denver

Two of Denver’s homegrown makers, Craft Boner and Moore Collection, are teaming up to open their first brick-and-mortar store in North Denver.

Yes Please has opened a 3,000-square-foot retail and production facility at 3851 Steele St.

“Craft Boner and Moore Collections are very different brands, but for years we’ve shared the dream of opening a store that’s also a community space,” says Kiwi Schloffel, owner of Craft Boner. “Our vision is to showcase the real people and work behind our products with a retail space in front and a visible production area in the back.”

Craft Boner, known for its hilariously poignant gifts and paper products, started its online business in 2012, inspired by the dilemma of purchasing a greeting card that honestly says what the giver means. Brand favorites include a mug inscribed with  “Christmas is For Carbs” greeting card.

Moore Collection, owned by Tanner Barkin and Taylor Palmie, began in 2010 as a custom screen printing business in Barkin’s parents’ garage. Today, the duo designs and hand prints its own T-shirts, each with a high level of quality. Popular styles include imagery of Aspens surrounding a campsite, as well as designs inscribed with “The Mountains Are Calling” and “Take Me To The Trees.”

“Our goal at Moore Collection is to create something tangible, inspired by our own interests, that other people can enjoy,” says Palmie. “By juxtaposing our T-shirts with Craft Boner’s playful products, we’re confident that Yes Please will offer something for everyone while supporting Colorado makers.”

Yes Please will be open from 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. Monday through Saturday.
 

The Record Company to headline holiday concert benefitting public schools

The Grammy Award-nominated Los Angeles band The Record Company is headlining the fourth annual Sing It To Me Santa concert Dec. 9 at the Ogden Theatre.

The concert will benefit music education in Denver Public Schools through the newly formed nonprofit organization Take Note Colorado.

“I am honored and proud to announce that Sing It To Me Santa will become a signature event under Take Note Colorado,” says Karen Radman, executive director of Take Note Colorado. “And, that net proceeds from Sing It To Me Santa 2017 will benefit music education in Denver Public Schools.”

The Record Company is a Los Angeles-based rock trio whose 2016 debut album was nominated for a Grammy in the category of Best Contemporary Blues Album.

Tickets for the show are available at www.axs.com. General admission tickets are $25-30, and VIP tickets are $250. Doors open at 7 p.m., and the show starts at 8 p.m. For information on sponsorships for the show, contact Karen Radman at karen@takenotecolorado.org.

Denver-based vintage rock/funk/blues powerhouse Tracksuit Wedding will open the show, performing original new tracs from its just-released second album “Now or Never” — and some holiday favorites to celebrate the season. 

Take Note Colorado, chaired by Gov. John Hickenlooper and Isaac Slade of The Fray, is a new statewide initiative with a goal to provide access to musical instruments and instruction to all of Colorado’s K-12 students. Sing It To Me Santa is a benefit concert created in 2014 by Libby Anschutz.

City and County Building gets new composition for chimes

A new composition has been installed in the 10-bell chime of the Denver City and County Building. 

“Ascent,” by artist Kevin Padworski, will be played on significant and special days for the City of Denver.

“The goal of the composition was to capture the essence of the people the music aimed to represent — the people of Denver,” Padworski says. “With a quickly growing population, full of diversity and a multitude of backgrounds, I sought to create the music that would evoke this catalytic energy. The task of composing for bells combined with a limitted set of pitches was a unique and exciting challenge and privilege.”

Padworski visited the building multiple times to play and hear the bell tower. He planted himself “on location” downtown so he was surrounded by people he could draw the music from. The composition features ascending musical lines that represent the city — its growth, the people, the topography of the state and hope in its future.

“Bells have such an iconic and timeless sound, and it is my hope that this new music can be heard in a new way to serve and inspire the people of this city,” Padworski said. 

DAM work to begin in November

After five years of planning, design work and fundraising, the Denver Art Museum is preparing for the North Building renovation work on Nov. 20. 

The landmark building will be open to visitors through Sunday Nov. 19 and then will close to the public to remove collections and prepare the space for construction. Starting Monday, Nov. 20, the Hamilton Building, south of 13th Avenue, will be open to the public seven days a week to provide additional opportunities for visitor access during the renovation project.

The museum will host two free talks with the North Building project’s architecture team from Denver-based Fentress Architects and Boston-based Machado Silvetti. Curtis Fentress and Jorge Silvetti will share project design concepts and discuss the inspirations behind them at two presentations at 3 p.m. and 5:30 p.m. Oct. 6 in the DAM’s Ponti Hall. Free tickets will be available to the public beginning Aug. 22. 

Enhancements to the Gio Ponti-designed North building will enable the museum to better serve the community by putting education at the heart of the museum campus, presenting new and expanded art gallery spaces, improving all major systems throughout the 210,000-square-foot building and creating a central point of entry with a new Welcome Center. The project is expected to be completed by the building’s 50th anniversary at the end of 2021.

The DAM has been raising funds privately for the last five years, receiving generous support from many early donors. The museum also is participating in the City of Denver’s General Obligation Fund process to help fund compliance with the Americans with Disabilities Act, as well as life safety, mechanical, electrical, plumbing and outdoor-safety upgrades. The bond would help complete the DAM’s fundraising efforts by providing $35.5 million toward critical upgrades and enhancements within the North Project — about a quarter of the funds required to complete the estimated $150 million renovation. If the bond is approved, the DAM would match every public dollar with approximately three private dollars.

 

Street artists to paint RiNo for CRUSH

Graffiti and street artists will descend on the RiNo to transform the neighborhood’s streets and alleys into an urban open-air gallery for the 7th annual CRUSH.

CRUSH celebrates the craft of graffiti and street artists who bring life to walls while maintaining the unique identity of the rapidly evolving community. It gives all ages and demographics a chance to experience graffiti and street art first hand. The event is a forum for community engagement and creative expression, inviting locals and visitors to engage in forward-thinking public art in Denver. 

Event organizers also will work with local youth artists, providing them unique opportunities to paint alongside the world’s best.

“These artists are building the creative culture right in front of our eyes,” says Amanda Kriss, program assistant at the RiNo Art District. “Besides working on walls, these artists are now gaining respect in the gallery community too, showing t heir work alongside other fine artists.”

The CRUSH event brings graffiti and street artists into the spotlight as a positive medium that unites the community through creativity and empowerment to make positive change in areas that may be disregarded.

“As a district, we’ve found that murals not only help with our graffiti issues but tend to attract people from all walks of life to enjoy free access to world-class artwork,” says Tracy Weil, the district’s creative director.

Centered on 27th and Larimer between 40th and Williams, CRUSH attracts 20,000 visitors to the district during the week of the event, scheduled for Sept. 11-17.

Zen Compound to open in old City Hall event space

One of San Francisco’s hottest concepts is coming to Denver. 

This fall, San Francisco artist-DJ-entrepreneur Paul Hemming will open his second Zen Compound, a groundbreaking facility that combines four distinct but related concepts into a single space: ECO-SYSTM, a co-working space for creative professionals, startups and freelancers; Mirus, a gallery championing new movements in contemporary art; Hive, a unique coffee and cocktail bar and restaurant; and Temple Nightclub, an innovative club known for its programming, production feats and legendary hospitality. 

“We see Denver as a sister city to San Francisco in many ways,” Hemming says. “The Mile High City is a major metropolitan hub and has an eclectic confluence of technology, music, art, entertainment and nightlife. It’s an exploding market with refined tastes, an entrepreneurial spirit and drive. Denver has a highly affluent market with appreciation for creativity and attention to detail.”

Located in the old City Hall Event Venue at 1136 N. Broadway, the 20,000-square-foot, three-story Zen Compound will open in stages, with Temple Nightclub as the first concept to go live this fall. All three remaining concepts are expected to be up and running by 2018.

The compound will bring 100 new jobs to Denver, including 80 in the nightclub.

Interactive artwork unveiled at Levitt Pavilion

The latest addition to the city of Denver’s public art collection was dedicated July 20 as part of the grand opening celebration for the newly built Levitt Pavilion Denver at Ruby Hill Park.

“Sky Song” by Colorado artists Nick Geurts and Ryan Elmendorf is a two-part interactive sculpture that blends light and sound through interaction with the viewer and even the sky above. 

Comprised of mirror-polished stainless steel, “Sky Song” invites viewers to create music by pressing any combination of 33 buttons on an eight-foot-tall sculpture on the plaza. The kiosk is linked to its companion piece 30 feet away on the building’s facade. During concerts at Levitt Pavilion, the interactive function transitions from sound to light. With 25 lights and bells, “Sky Song” is an engaging public artwork.

The Levitt Pavilion is programmed, managed and supported by Friends of Levitt Paviolion Denver, a local nonprofit dedicated to building community through music. 

Upcoming concerts include:
  • July 23: The Stone Foxes
  • Aug. 3: The Suffers
  • Aug. 4: John Fulbright
  • Aug. 5: The Reminders co-headline with Fed Rez
  • Aug. 6: Rocky Dawuni with the Bunny Gang
  • Aug. 9: Hippo Campus with Slow Caves and Corsicana
  • Aug. 10: The Dustbowl Revival with Charley Crockett
  • Aug. 13: The Band of Heathens with Blake Brown & The American Dust Choir
  • Aug. 17 The Haunted Windchimes and Edison
  • Aug. 18: My Body Sings Electric and Chemistry Club
  • Aug. 19: Smooth Hound Smith with Anthony Ruptak & The Midnight Friends
  • Aug. 24: Gaby Moreno
  • Aug. 25: Mariachi Sol de Mi Tierra with Fiesta Colorado Dance Company
  • Aug. 26: Karl Denson’s Tiny Universe
  • Aug. 27: New Breed Brass Band with Denver Municipal Band
  • Aug. 30: Ripe with Chris Daniels & the Kings with Freddi Gowdy
  • Aug. 31: Inspector with Izcalli
The public is invited to bring their picnic blankets and lawn chairs to the free concerts. There also will be a handful of ticketed shows featuring artists like UB40 and 311.

Saucy Bombay opens on East Colfax

Saucy Bombay has opened its doors at 2600 E. Colfax Ave.

The restaurant, created by husband-and-wife co-owners Marshall Miranda and Rhohini Saksena, brings Denver the flavors the couple has grown to love. 

“We have taken our time looking for the new location for Saucy Bombay,” Miranda says. “When the space on Colfax, across from East High School, became available, we knew it was the perfect new home for the concept.”

At the start of the serving line, diners are given a choice of a fresh Roti Wrap, a one-entree rice, quinoa, salad or yogi bowl; or a two-entree plate for the heartier appetite.

Entree choices include chicken breast, marinated skewered then grilled in the tandoor; steak, braised and boneless; braised leg of lamb; vegetable medley, sauteed and seasoned with turmeric and cumin; or slow-cooked and mildly seasoned garbanzo beans, along with paneer cauliflower rounds.

Moving down the line, guests then choose their sauce from an array, including tikka masala, korma, vindaloo, kadai, spinach and lentils. They then choose their side, with the star being the handmade naan, featuring a crisp exterior, fluffy core and distinctive charred flavor. The naan is offered in a variety of flavors with garlic and cheese to start. Other side choices include samosas, a turnover filled with potatoes and peas, or Bombay chicken; and potato vada, a lentil flour-battered potato dumpling.

Finally, guests can top their creation with a refreshing relish: either katchumber, a medley of diced cucumber, tomato or onions with lemon; or raita, a cool sauce of yogurt and grated cucumber, carrots and onions.

Entrees range in price from $8 to $11, depending on size and choices.

Salt-N-Pepa to headline Urban Nights fashion show

The ’90s rap and fashion icons Salt-N-Pepa are the featured entertainment at this years Urban Nights Denver, the city’s largest outdoor urban fashion show and fundraiser that benefits at-risk youth.

Urban Nights celebrates its fifth annual fundraiser Aug. 5 at Mile HIgh Station. The event benefits Urban Peak, The Danny Dietz Foundation and La Academia at The Denver inner City Parish.

“On any given night in Denver, more than 900 youth are homeless or on the verge of becoming homeless,” says Donna Crafton Montgomery, 2017 Urban Nights chair. “This year, we are thrilled to add new beneficiaries that expand our reach into this vulnerable population providing a wide range of services to the at-risk youth that each organization serves.”

This year’s fashion show, designed at produced by Jenny Baker-Strasburg and Tobie Orr, will feature works from the Art Institute of Colorado and Suit Supply. The fashion show will be anchored by “Built from Scratch,” the 2017 fall/winter line created by New York Fashion Week darling Nicholas K.

Tickets for the event, under the canopy of the Colfax Avenue viaduct at Mile High Station, are on sale now. The VIP party starts at 6 p.m., with general admission opening at 7 p.m. Salt-N-Pepa hits the stage at 9 p.m. The show will be followed by an after party until midnight.

TheBigWonderful returns in May

When TheBigWonderful returns for its fourth season May 5-7, the pop-up event will feature city's best craft vendors, craft brewers and musicians will gather at the former Denver Post printing plant at 4400 Fox St. in Globeville.

TheBigWonderful's bazaar is curated to be a decidedly Denver experience. The city's best craft vendors and food trucks are brought together in one marketplace for a lively eating and shopping experience. Vendors will offer everything from fresh produce to handmade jewelry and clothing.

Hand-picked musical acts include a slew of bluegrass performers, including headliners Jeff Austin & Friends, The Drew Emmitt Band, Andy Thorn & Friends and DeadPhish Orchestra.

TheBigWonderful is partnering with Lyft for discounted ride sharing to and from the event all weekend long. TheBigWonderful's nonprofit partner this year is Re:Vision, an organization that works with people in economically marginalized areas to develop resident leaders, cultivate community food systems and create an economy owned by the community.

Tickets range from $5 for access to the day bazaar to $59 for the full weekend day and night bazaars with sampling from 20 boozy vendors and all bands.

Contact Confluence Denver Development News Editor Margaret Jackson with tips and leads for future stories at margaret@confluence-denver.com.

Tansey Contemporary to open in LoDo

An internationally renowned art gallery is relocating its headquarters to 1743 Wazee St. in Lower Downtown.

Tansey Contemporary is expanding its presence from Santa Fe, N.M., to Denver. Its current space on Santa Fe's famed Canyon Road will remain open, but Denver will be the headquarters from which the Tanseys hope to continue to expand the business' international reach.

"Denver is an attractive place to run an international business," says Michael Tansey, who with his wife, Jennifer, owns the gallery. "Its growing population, thriving economy, continually improving infrastructure, international accessibility and diverse, skilled workforce make it ideal for our purposes. We think it is significant that Denver's voters and leaders understand the positive contribution the arts make to the city's economic development, as demonstrated by the recent extension of the Scientific and Cultural Facilities District."

Michael Tansey is involved in the national arts community as majority owner and chairman of Art Miami LLC, which runs a growing portfolio of prestigious international art fairs primarily staged in Florida and New York.

Jennifer Tansey is from the Denver area. She left her position as membership manager at Colorado Public Radio to run the gallery, which the couple acquired in 2013. She is a member of the 2017 Colorado Business Committee for the Arts' Leadership Arts class.

Contact Confluence Denver Development News Editor Margaret Jackson with tips and leads for future stories at margaret@confluence-denver.com.

Arts & Venues partners with Meow Wolf on art space effort

Denver Arts & Venues is teaming up with Santa Fe's Meow Wolf to help with the compliance and safety needs of the city's Do-It-Yourself and alternative spaces.

Arts & Venues will contribute $20,000 toward funding the program organized by Meow Wolf, which previously announced plans to distribute $100,000 in annual funding to support safer DIY music and arts venues across the country. Arts & Venue's money will support infrastructural improvements, rent assistance, materials, equipment and other needs identified by Denver applicants. The fund also supports additional resources for legal, zoning and building code consulting services.

"Meow Wolf was an ideal partner for addressing short-term needs while we continue to explore more long-terms opportunities to support safe, creative spaces," says Kent Rice, executive director of Arts & Venuses. "As an artist collective, Meow Wolf has emerged as a leader in the region, working closely with Denver-based artists and reacting quickly to the acute space challenges of artists nationwide with the development of its funding program."

Meow Wolf is collecting applications for Denver-based funding until March 31. 

In addition to Arts & Venues' efforts, Denver Community Planning and Development and the Denver Fire Department have taken steps to support the needs of the arts community. For those seeking to turn an existing warehouse or commercial space into a live/work space, CPD launched a guide that outlines basic steps for establishing a safe and legal live/work space in an existing building. The fire department is offering free inspections for tenants and landlords, who can apply through March 31.

Contact Confluence Denver Development News Editor Margaret Jackson with tips and leads for future stories at margaret@confluence-denver.com.

DAM revitalization spurs exhibit on North Building's history

With the Denver Art Museum's upcoming North Building revitalization project, an exhibition on the renowned modernist building, its history and its future will open Feb. 19.

"Then, Now, Next: Evolution of an Architectural Icon" will feature historical photos, original architectural sketches, building models and project renderings to tell the story of the North Building's evolution.

The exhibition showcases architect Gio Ponti's original vision for the building and explores how the North Building has served an expanding and diversifying community since opening its doors in 1971. 

It also features the museum's future plans and outlines the guiding principles for the revitalization project: Responsibly managing and caring for buildings and collections, offering a superior visitor experience, unifying the campus and inviting the entire community to enjoy the museum and programs.

The historic Western American art galleries will close to the public after Jan. 29 for the North Building revitalization project. A selection of artworks from the DAM's collection will be on view at History Colorado in "Backstory: Western American Art in Context," opening March 18. Contemporary Western American art will remain on view on the second level of the Hamilton Building.

The North Building revitalization project is being funded, in part, by a $25 million pledge from Lanny and Sharon Martin, the largest financial gift in the museum's history. In recognition of the Martins' gift, the North Building will be renamed the J. Landis and Sharon Martin Building.

Designed by Boston's Machado Silvetti Architects and Fentress Architects of Denver, the revitalization project is estimated at $150 million. Key project elements include bringing the museum's renowned educational programs to the center of the campus, expanding gallery spaces for growing collections, including Design and Western American art, completing Ponti's original vision for visitor access to stunning seventh-floor views, exterior site improvements, a new welcome center and updating environmental and other key systems to current-generation technology.

Contact Confluence Denver Development News Editor Margaret Jackson with tips and leads for future stories at margaret@confluence-denver.com.

DIA celebrates Colorado's Western lifestyle with exhibit

Travelers at Denver International Airport can experience the history of Colorado's Western lifestyle through the Arts and Culture Program's latest exhibit: "True Colorado: Western Heritage, Then & Now."

The exhibit, located at the Ansbacher Hall in the Jeppesen Terminal on Level 6 before A Bridge Security, is on display through March. It celebrates the western cultural history of the state and features past and present artifacts and information.

The Mayor's Office of the National Western Center, an initiative of Denver Mayor Michael Hancock, plus four significant Colorado establishments are featured for their contributions as tourist destinations, educators and beacons for important cultural and Western traditions. The exhibit explores the history, future vision and creativity of each operation as they forge into the future while still embracing their long-running Colorado legacy.

In addition to the Mayor's Office, participating exhibitors include the National Western Stock Show, Colorado State University Extension's 4-H, Rockmount Western Wear Manufacturing Co. and The Colorado Saddlery Co.

DIA's Art and Culture program administers the City and County of Denver's 1 percent for art ordinance, which enhances public places and features nearly 34 site-specific works, including sculptures, murals and other installations. Pieces are displayed in outdoor landscapes, inside Jeppesen Terminal and on airport concoures, as well as in the train tunnels and on the train itself.

Contact Confluence Denver Development News Editor Margaret Jackson with tips and leads for future stories at margaret@confluence-denver.com.

RiNo mural encourages unity

A new mural recently installed in the RiNo Art District is designed to encourage people to reflect on our similarities, instead of our differences.

Internationally renowned mural artist Kelsey Montague created #WhatUnitesUs on the corner of 26th and Larimer streets to create an interactive dialogue about unity and the shared human experience through art. The RiNo Art District plans to expand on the mural and campaign in the coming months to engage the diverse communities of Denver in further conversation, programs and projects to better connect with and support them.

"Our country and city are feeling the stress of dividing forces now more than ever," says Jaimie Licko, president of the RiNo Art District. "It is our home that this project ignites a conversation within RiNo and across Denver about meaningful ways we can work together, support each other and raise each other up. RiNo is currently benefitting from strong economic growth, and we feel it is our duty and responsibility to ensure that the diverse communities that surround us are not isolated from that but instead are part of it."

Montague previously gained notoriety for her mural series #WhatLiftsYou, a mural project that encouraged people to snap photos in front of a set of muraled wings and share them online, providing everyone the opportunity to share more about what inspires them in life. 

"Kelsey is a major player in the mural scene," says Tracy Weil, co-founder and creative director of the RiNo Art District. "We are so excited to welcome her back to her hometown to create such an impactful piece. We are committed to utilizing our platform as an art district to advocate for social impact through art."

Contact Confluence Denver Development News Editor Margaret Jackson with tips and leads for future stories at margaret@confluence-denver.com.
67 Creative Sector Articles | Page: | Show All
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