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DIA to offer tiered parking rates starting Feb. 15

Denver International Airport will begin offering tiered parking rates in its popular economy and valet lots based on length of stay.

Beginning Feb. 15, passengers using the east or west economy lots will pay $16 per day for the first three days of a visit, with that reduced to $15 a day for each additional day during the same trip. Hourly rates in the economy lots will be $4.

Valet parking rates will be $33 a day for the first three days, followed by just $10 a day for subsequent days during a consecutive stay. Hourly valet service will be $16 for the first hour and $4 for each additional hour.

In addition, some maximum daily parking rates also will change. The East and West garages will charge $25 daily and $4 an hour; short-term parking will be $5 an hour.

DIA’s price of $8 a day for the Pikes Peak and Mount Elbert shuttle lots will remain unchanged. The airport also will continue to offer guaranteed close spaces by reserving a space in either garage for an additional fee by visiting www.DIAReservedParking.com.

All of DIA’s parking options come with free vehicle services, including jump starts, tire inflation and car key retrieval if they’ve been locked in the vehicle. The airport also helps with finding lost vehicles. All of the services are available by calling (303) DIA-PARK, option 1 and at www.FlyDenver.com.
 

Jasinski opens Ultreia Union Station

Award-winning Chef Jennifer Jasinski has opened Ultreia in Denver’s historic Union Station.

Ultreia (pronounced uhl trey uh) is the second restaurant in Union Station from Crafted Concepts, which includes Jansinski’s business partners Beth Gruitch, Jorel Pierce, Adam Branz, Matthew Brooks and Jessica Richter. It joins the group’s successful seafood concept Stoic & Genuine.

The word Ultreia has its roots in Latin, loosely translates to “onward” and refers to the words of encouragement shouted to pilgrims on their Camino de Santiago — a 1,000-year-old pilgrimage to the shrine of St. James in the Cathedral of Santiago de Compostela in Spain.

“We pay respect to the classics and put our own unexpected twists onto them, but we’re not Spanish,” Jasinski says.

Ultreia embraces the Beaux Arts style of the building but injects inspiration from the Iberian peninsula to create a rich dining experience. Original plaster moldings and terrazzo floors are complemented by a new mural based on a 17th-century landscape painting by Aelberg Cuyp that covers the walls and ceilings. A new dining mezzanine above the open kitchen allows patrons to climb the stairs and dine under the clouds. A custom-built, 8-foot diameter chandelier floats below the sky.

The bar features a granite slab and a six-tier back bar that displays a large selection of wines, gin and sherries.

Open for lunch and dinner daily, the Ultreia menu reflects traditional Portuguese and Spanish methods translated into the vision of chefs Jasinski and Branz and includes Ajo Bianco, an Adalusian almond garlic soup with grapes; Pan con Tomate, ciabatta, olive oil, garlic and tomatoes; Estofado de Pulpo, a stew of octopus, pork rib, chorizo, beans; and Asado de Cordero, roasted leg of lamb, north African spices.

“Our trips to Spain and Portugal confirmed the passion for ingredients and techniques that we expected from the Iberian peninsula,” Gruitch says.
 

Civitas to lead design for 5280 Loop

The Downtown Denver Partnership has selected urban design and landscape architecture firm Civitas to lead the design effort for the 5280 Loop, a project that will transform how the public right of way is used in downtown Denver.

The 5280 Loop will link neighborhoods and connect people by bringing underused streets into the downtown experience and uniting urban life with Colorado’s outdoor culture.

Denver-based Civitas’ outcome-based approach also attracted nationally known public health expert and HealthxDesign founder Rupal Sanghvi to join the team.

“Given the scale of what’s happening economically in Denver and the openness of the city to exploring how to achieve healthier outcomes, the 5280 Loop has the potential for impacting a population of some magnitude,” says Sanghvi, who was intrigued by the project’s prospects of serving as a model for “thinking more upstream” in promoting health through the physical shape of how we live, work and play.

The partnership and the project team are asking the community to help reimagine just over five miles of center city streets into a uniquely Denver amenity that prioritizes people, culture, nature and health. The 5280 Loop will promote active modes of transportation and connect many vibrant and diverse neighborhoods and civic destinations through the great urban outdoors. A conceptual design plan will be completed by September 2018.

“Cities around the world are rethinking the traditional definition of a street to go beyond just moving vehicles,” says John Desmond, the partnership’s executive vice president for urban environment. “The 5280 Loop will be Denver’s answer on how to transform a network of our streets into iconic shared spaces that will continue to move people and connect neighborhoods. At the same time, they’ll promote community and celebrate the urban experience in an authentically Denver way.”

For more on the project click here.
 

RiNo flips switch on art installation at underpass

The RiNo Art District has flipped the switch on a creative lighting and mural installation at the 38th Street Underpass between Blake and Wazee streets.

The installation includes an immersive light environment designed and created by Knomad Colab, as well as a new mural for the southern wall designed by Jason Graves and Pat Milbery of the So-Gnar Creative Division. The project required retrofitting nearly 100-year-old railroad infrastructure. The installation provides enhanced light, activation, color and safety to an important connector for the area.

“Two years ago, RiNo won the P.S. You Are Here Grant from Denver Arts and Venues to provide a creative solution to the sudden blindness drivers experience as they go from the bright light of 38th Street under the train bridge,” says Jamie Licko, president of the RiNo Art District. “We never anticipated the project growing into what it has become nor could we have predicted how much of a challenge this project would be, but the outcome is a spectacular utilization of art to solve a complex problem.”

The lighting installation, called Arabesque, will make one of the longest-standing connections between the east and west sides of RiNo safer for bicyclists, pedestrians and drivers alike. Knomad Colab was tasked with creating an installation in an environment that was prohibitive of installations because the bridge and its walls are owned by Union Pacific Railroad and could not be touched. Ultimately, they drew inspiration from the antique railing underneath the underpass and worked closely with the City of Denver to use property fabricate a creative solution.

“Arabesque is the culmination of many individual paths woven together to create a unified fabric, a whimsical experience and a safe and inviting passageway for community members and visitors alike,” says Katy Flaccavento, half of the Knomad Colab team. “Arabesque invites all walks to travel through a fantastical portal, to weave their story into the thick fabric of what was, is and will be.”
 

Fund to help artists make spaces safe



Denver Arts & Venues has launched the Safe Creative Spaces Fund as an extension of the city’s Safe Occupancy Program in an effort to provide funding for improvements to buildings that are occupied by artists.

The program will provide $300,000 in need-based funding for creative space tenant safety and building improvements. Applications are being accepted online.

“We are committed to cultivating, sustaining and promoting our diverse artistic and creative industry, including that our artists have a safe, affordable space where they can live and work,” Mayor Michael Hancock says. “The Safe Occupancy Program and the Safe Creative Spaces Fund are designed to support our creative professionals with resources to get these live-work spaces up to code, keep them affordable and avoid further displacements.”

Funding will be administered through Jan. 17, 2020 and is available to tenant or owner applicants who own or run a creative space such as a live/work collective, a creative business or a creative assembly space in the City and County of Denver that is enrolled in the Safe Occupancy Program.

The funds will be administered through a partnership with RedLine, a nonprofit contemporary art center. RedLine also will facilitate support between artists and art businesses. Applicants are encouraged to contact Redline for free, confidential guidance before enrolling in the Safe Occupancy Program or applying for Safe Creative Spaces Funding.

“RedLine is very excited to collaborate with Denver Arts & Venues, the City of Denver and the greater arts and culture communities to help address the growing need for safe creative spaces in Denver,” says Louise Martorano, executive director of RedLine. “Both the Safe Occupancy Program and Safe Creative Space Fund represent two key initiatives that not only provide a path for security and stability for artists in creative spaces, but also the financial resources to make that path accessible.”
 

Art, event and maker space Lot Twenty Eight opens in RiNo next summer

Next summer, Denver developer Formativ will open Lot Twenty Eight, a 45,000-square-foot restaurant retail and event space in the River North neighborhood.

The project, in a former manufacturing plant at 28th and Blake streets, also includes a 20,000-square-foot outdoor urban garden designed for gathering, events and community activations. The development includes space for unique food and beverage concepts, gathering spaces, street-facing retail and an artist maker space.

Designed by Oz Architecture, Lot Twenty Eight’s artist and maker space will allow the local creative community to show their work and expand their brands. Small and mid-sized, open rooms will be available for individuals or groups to rent. The space will enable makers to be highly visible.

There also will be 2,300 square feet of event space that can be reserved for private, community or corporate events. When not in use, the space will be programmed as a rotating gallery featuring the works of local artists.

Founded by Sean Campbell and Josh Marinos, Formativ’s projects include the World Trade Center Denver adjacent to the 38th and Blake commuter rail stop and Industry, a 4-year-old collaborative workspace and residential development on Brighton Boulevard.

Crush, Clyfford Still, Shakespeare Fest lead Mayor's Arts Awards

Six groups and individuals are being with the Mayor’s Awards for Excellence in Arts & Culture for their significant and lasting contributions to the arts in the City and County of Denver.

“These award recipients exemplify Denver’s vibrant and diverse cultural and artistic scene,” Denver Mayor Michael Hancock says. “Through the work of these dedicated and inspiring individuals and groups, the arts have become more accessible, visible, interactive and integrated into the lives of our residents and visitors.”

The winners were chosen by a panel made up of members of the Denver Commission on Cultural Affairs, Denver Arts & Venues employees and community members involved in arts and culture in Denver.

The winners are:
  • Arts & Culture Youth Award: Denver Public Schools for the 34-year-old Shakespeare Festival, the oldest and largest student Shakespeare Festival in the Country.
  • Arts & Culture Impact Award: Mexican Cultural Center, which over the last 25 years has developed a variety of cultural and educational programs designed to increase awareness and highlight the importance of Mexican culture in the United States, particularly in Colorado.
  • Arts & Culture Global Award: Clyfford Still Museum, which in September 2016 sent nine paintings from its collection to the Royal Academy of Arts in London for a seminal exhibition on Abstract Expressionism.
  • Arts & Culture Innovation Award: Crush, Colorado’s largest independent graffiti and street art project and event.
  • IMAGINE 2020 Award: Irene Vilar, who for more than a decade has demonstrated how the arts can be an effective and impactful vehicle for raising social awareness and inspiring action.
  • Leadership in the Arts Award: Floyd Ciruli, who has worked with a variety of organizations and public officials to build a coalition of support for the Scientific and Cultural Facilities District.

Hancock also presented the IMAGINE 2020 District Challenge Award to Denver Councilwoman Stacie Gilmore for the “Community Channels” mural, which community members and Montbello High School students and artist Pat Milbery created in the canal at 51st Avenue and Crown Boulevard.

A very 2017 promotion: Cherry Creek shop will pay for Uber, Lyft

Massive construction projects in Cherry Creek North have made it difficult for holiday shoppers to find parking, so one creative business owner is taking matters into her own hands by offering to pay for customers to use UBER or Lyft to visit her gift shop.

Katie Friedland, owner of Show of Hands, an art gallery and gift shop that’s called Cherry Creek North home for 32 years, said she’s seen sales decline this year as shoppers steer clear of the area because of construction.

Even though Show of Hands has four of its own parking spots, to help save the holidays for all the small businesses in Cherry Creek North, the shop will pay anyone that presents a receipt for an UBER or Lyft ride into the area and spends $100 at the store, $20 in cash. Customers will receive $40 in cash if they spend $200 or more.

“While many people love finding one-of-a-kind gifts at the stores in Cherry Creek, because streets are closed and they can’t find parking, they are not visiting our store,” Friedland said. “I’m a single mom and small-business owner. While we support progress, the holiday season is critical to me and many of the retail stores in the area. After hearing complaints from customers and calculating current sales numbers, I realized we needed to get creative here. I though, if parking is the issue, then let’s pay for people to take an UBER or Lyft ride into the area to shop. Problem solved.”

Eight showrooms sign on to IDC Building

When The IDC Building opens early next year, it will house up to 15 of the metro area’s top home-design showrooms in 60,000 square feet at 590 Quivas St.

The showrooms will offer a variety of products and services an a range of styles from modern to contemporary and traditional to transitional. Each showroom was chosen for its unique product selection and the value they bring to trade professionals and homeowners alike.

“Gone are the days of the traditional design center model with exclusivity only to the trade and doors and walls between every showroom,” says Al Castelo, head developer of IDC. “When creating The IDC Building concept, my team and I visited major design centers around the country and discovered the demand for a more experiential retail model. We chose to build a community at IDC and create an accessible environment that encourages partners, homeowners and the trade to collaborate.”

So far, eight showrooms have signed onto to be part of The IDC Building:
  • Aztec Carpet & Rug
  • Benjamin Moore
  • Classy Closets
  • Custom Concrete Prep & Polish
  • Inspire Kitchen Design
  • Lolo Rugs & Gifts
  • T&G Flooring
  • Ultra Design Center
The functional displays will allow visitors to experience how products will look and work in their own homes.

The building was a collective effort designed by architect Hartronft Associates and developed and owned by Tri-West Companies.
 

Del Corazon apartments open in Westwood

A $40 million affordable housing project has opened in Denver’s Westwood neighborhood.

The 197-unit Del Corazon at 4400 Morrison Road is located on 4.5 acres spanning both sides of Morrison Road. All of the apartments will be available to households earning 60 percent or less of the area median income (up to $35,280 for a one-person household or up to $45,360 for a family of three.

Community amenities include a clubhouse with fitness center, lounge, kitchen, patio, playground, futsal court, community plaza and Westwood’s first-ever car-share program provided by Enterprise. The project also features a new median for safe crossing of Morrison Road.

Del Corazon, meaning “from the heart,” was developed by St. Charles Town Co. Public finance partners include the Denver Office of Economic Development, Colorado Department of Local Affairs and the Colorado Housing and Finance Authority.

Last year, Denver’s Community Planning and Development Office completed a neighborhood plan for Westwood, which is bounded by Sheridan Boulevard on the west, Federal Boulevard on the east, Alameda Avenue on the north and Mississippi Avenue on the south. The plan addresses the neighborhood’s isolation and food options, while celebrating the culture of the diverse community. The plan includes a health impact assessment from the Department of Environmental Health and addresses the neighborhood’s obesity rate, density and drainage issues and lack of recreation facilities.
 

RedPeak buys two apartment buildings in two weeks

RedPeak has acquired two Denver apartment buildings within a two-week time frame, bringing the company’s portfolio of multifamily properties to 29.

The company paid $11.5 million for the 69-unit property and adjacent parking lot at 960 Grant St. in Capitol Hill. The building was built in 1937 and consists of studios and one-bedroom units.

It paid Coughlin & Co. $14.75 million for 54 one- and two-bedroom apartments at 1375 High St. in Cheesman Park. The property was built in 1963 and renovated in 2008.

“With these two recent purchases, our current portfolio stands at 29, and we’re excited to be able to provide Denver’s growing population with quality residences in great urban locations,” says Bobby Hutchinson, RedPeak’s chief investment officer. “These are two of Denver’s finest apartment buildings, with classic brick facades and provide us with the opportunity to make renovations where needed and upgrade them even more with the RedPeak brand.”

RedPeak, which is actively pursuing acquisitions throughout Denver, is a full-service apartment owner, operator and developer with a portfolio of more than 2,300 units.

Family Jones distillery opens in LoHi

The Family Jones Spirit House has opened in Denver’s Lower Highland neighborhood.

The distillery at 3245 Osage St. is the result of a partnership between distiller Rob Masters and entrepreneurs Jack Pottle, Denielle Nadeau and Paul Tamburello, the developer behind the Olinger complex and Little Man Ice Cream. Justin Cucci, chef and owner of Root Down, Linger, Ophelia’s Electric Soapbox, Vital Root and El Five is also part of the team.

Located in a 2,000-square-foot space at 3245 Osage St., The Family Jones Distillery occupies the former Mancinelli’s Market building two doors from Root Down. Designed and built by tres birds workshop, the space pairs industrial elements with rich wood details. The roof was lifted to add a second-floor mezzanine where distillery operations are perched above a sunken, curvilinear, concrete bar. Guests enter the space through a large, square, woodent door made from reclaimed, on-site materials.

“This project has been a dream for several years,” Tamburello says. “The sharing of spirits and the idea of libation are part of many celebrations in life — whether it be celebrating the life of a loved one, toasting to new parents or even part of a liturgical service. It’s with this respect and knowledge that we enter this venture, crafting with care a family of spirits that will help people mark life’s special moments together.”

The 17-foot copper CARL still is where the blending begins. The Family Jones creates everything from vodka to gin and rum, as well as Stop Gap Whiskey, a house blend of whiskeys collected from Masters’ friends that will only be available at The Family Jones Spirit House during the distillery’s first years while The Family Jones’ house-distilled whiskey comes of age.

“We are making things that push the boundaries of a traditional cocktail bar,” Masters says. “We are putting our own spin on it. This is a distiller’s dream — to create all sorts of crazy things in small batches. It’s a test kitchen: If it doesn’t work, we can try something new.”
 

Colorado Enterprise Fund to participate in CO Impact Days

Colorado Enterprise Fund is among the 100 social ventures seeking “impact investments” that was chosen to meet with investors at CO Impact Days Social Venture Showcase Nov. 17.

The 100 ventures will convene at the Ellie Caulkins Opera House for the second year of the “shark-tank for good” statewide marketplace for impact investing. The selected social ventures will showcase their investment opportunities to offer not only a financial return on the impact investor’s investment but also to offer solutions to some of the most pressing issues of our time.”

“We are so thrilled to again invite more than 200 investors and philanthropists to interact with these valuable social ventures,” says Dr. Stephanie Gripne, founder of the Impact Finance Center and creator of the CO Impact Days. “When these two groups of powerful movers and shakers share a room, there is no telling the good that will come. We’ve aimed to offer a diverse array of impact investments, with a goal that every investor will leave knowing that deal flow is not a Colorado impact investing problem.”

The goal of CO Impact Days is to catalyze $100 million in impact investments into Colorado social ventures in the next three years, and it is kicking off with CO Impact Days Nov. 15-17. The initiative is possible because Colorado is home to a number of national leaders in impact investing and a thriving and collaborative community of social venture entrepreneurs in both the for-profit and nonprofit sectors, as well as philanthropists and investors who are committed to growing Colorado’s economy and creating good jobs.

“Funding from these impact investors will enable us to serve more Colorado businesses, which in turn will ultimately advance economic opportunity and prosperity in our Colorado communities,” says Ceyl Prinster, president and CEO of Colorado Enterprise Fund.
 

Broker's buyer bonus: Helping to send a child to school in Uganda

Denver real estate broker Tenzin Gyaltsen is helping put Ugandan children through school one home sale at a time through a partnership with the S.O.U.L Foundation.

One child will be put through school for every home sale that’s over $300,000. It costs about $1,600 to put a child through all seven years of primary school.

“That gives them all of their school books and one meal per day,” said Gyaltsen, a broker associate with Coldwell Banker Residential Brokerage in Colorado. “It’s an added bonus to the house. It almost personifies it in a way.”

Gyaltsen, who formerly owned an eco-friendly clothing company, met representatives from S.O.U.L (Supporting Opportunities for Ugandans to Learn) at an event and fell in love with the organization. He had a desire to do something philanthropic, so he sponsored Rita Naigaga, the first of many students.

When he turned his attention to real estate he decided to expand his efforts by sponsoring a child with proceeds from every house he lists for more than $300,000.

Gyaltsen works with investors to buy houses, fix them up and resell them. When he has an upcoming listing he contacts S.O.U.L to pledge to sponsor a student, The organization then sends a child’s photo and bio, which will be framed and displayed in the house. If the new owners wish, the address of the newly sold home stays with the sponsorship, and all the letters and updates from the student are mailed to the house.

“Lack of education is one of the biggest problems in the world,” Gyaltsen said. “In this part of the world, most children don’t get an education. It’s important to equip children with knowledge so they can go out and better the world and their communities.”

Oskar Blues to open in LoDo

Oskar Blues will open its third Grill and Brew location this fall at 1630 Market St. in LoDo.

The 10,636-square-foot restaurant will serve lunch and dinner daily in the two-story structure. The traditional restaurant and bar service will be upstairs. Downstairs, the Black Buzzard music venue occupies 5,500 square feet and boasts a stage and professional sound system, grand-and-go food kiosk and full-service bar that accommodates up to 330 guests. Patrons can expect an impressive lineup of local and national bluegrass, rock, blues, reggae and folk musicians with scheduled performances.

“We’ve been working diligently over the past 20 years to evolve and perfect our concept, and now we’re ready to bring the Grill and Brew’s signature blend of Southern-inspired Creole and Cajun dishes and entertainment to Denver,” says Jason Rogers, Oskar Blues Grill and Brew's restaurant director and partner. “It mirrors the Lyons and Colorado Springs locations, while adding a signature Denver flair. We want to deliver something special that LoDo could call its own.”

The grand opening of the restaurant and music venue is slated for late November.

Founded and headquartered in Lyons, the Oskar Blues Fooderies division is a brand of the Oskar Blues Brewery.
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