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17 of 28 cranes in Denver are for residential projects

Residential projects account for 17 of the 28 cranes dotting Denver’s skyline, according to Crane’s latest Quarterly Cost Report from Rider Levett Bucknall (RLB).

That’s a minor decline from the 29 cranes in the report’s previous count. Nationally, the number of tower cranes increased 10 percent, confirming the hot pace of urban building. Residential and mixed-use lead the activity.

“The increase in the net crane count indicates that the construction industry is prospering, despite a tight labor market and materials tariffs,” said Julian Anderson, president of RLB North America. “Our outlook for the industry through the end of the year remains positive.”

In Denver, Market Station, a $200 million complex of retail, residential and workplace buildings, is on track to revitalize the Lower Downtown neighborhood, according to RLB. The company predicts that construction in the downtown area is likely to grow as surface parking is replaced by mixed-use buildings designed to heighten the presence of retail and dining businesses in response to the increasing residential population.

Denver cracks top 10 on ranking of tech talent

Denver moved up to No. 10 this year on CBRE’s Tech Talent Scorecard, the first time the city has ranked among the top 10 North American tech markets.

Tech labor concentration, or the percentage of total employment, is an influential factor in how “tech-centric” the market is and its growth potential. Denver has a tech talent labor pool of 99,760, or 6.2 percent of its total employment, placing it among the top 10 most-tech-concentrated markets and well above the national average of 3.5 percent.

Tech wage growth is another contributing factor to a city’s ability to attract and retain its tech talent. Denver’s average annual tech wage now tops $100,000, ranking 10th out of the 50 U.S. and Canadian markets studied and marking a a 15 percent increase in tech wage growth over the last five years.

“Tech continues to play an increasingly larger role in Denver’s ecosphere,” said Alex Hammerstein, senior vice president with CBRE’s Tech and Media Practice in Denver. “We see everything from startups to Fortune 500 tech companies opening and expanding their operations here, drawn to our educated workforce and supportive entrepreneurial culture. On the talent side, people choose Denver for our quality of life, relatively affordable cost of living and high-paying employment opportunities.”

The Tech Talent Scorecard is determined based on 13 metrics, including tech talent supply, growth, concentration, cost, completed tech degrees, industry outlook for job growth and market outlook for both office and apartment rent cost growth.

Denver stood out in the report in several other key areas:
  • Denver’s tech labor force grew 23.8 percent (adding 19,200 workers) over the past five years, among the fastest of large North American tech markets.
  • Denver produces a strong number of tech graduates but also continues to draw outside talent who are attracted to the tech job opportunities; Denver added more than 1,500 more tech jobs than tech graduates during the last five years.
  • The availability of tech jobs is helping to attract millennials — Denver saw a 6.8 percent increase in its millennial population change in the past five years, nearly double the U.S. average of 3.7 percent.

RiNo Made to celebrate Warhol's 90th birthday

RiNo Made is celebrating renowned artist Andy Warhol’s 90th birthday with commemorative art, events and collaborations.

Each month, the RiNo Made store inside Zeppelin Station features an artist from the RiNo Art District. In August, RiNo Made is presenting a group show inspired by Warhol’s works. The show opens for First Friday, Aug. 3.

In addition to the new selection of art, RiNo Made also will debut its latest collaboration with Gelato Boy on its newest ice cream flavor, Candy Warhol. Guests will be able to sample the creation and see the winner of the artist competition to design the Warhol-inspired gelato container at the opening reception from 6 to 9 p.m. Aug. 4.

The celebration continues with RiNo Made and the Denver Public Library throwing a birthday party the night before Warhol’s actual birthday during Dr. Sketchy’s Anti-Art School. At the free event from 5 to 8 p.m. Aug. 5 at RiNo Made, Dr. Sketchy’s will have a model dressed as Warhol for artists to sketch. Birthday cake will be served between sessions.

 

Denver Flea returns to Denver Rock Drill

Hundreds of local makers and small businesses from Colorado and the Western region will gather at the Denver Flea July 13-15 at the Denver Rock Drill in the RiNo/Cole neighborhood.

Vendors will set up shop at the Denver Rock Drill, 1717 E. 39th Ave., alongside food trucks and six pop-up bars serving great Divide beer and special Flea craft cocktails.

The Summer Flea weekend kicks off with the event’s first Talking Heads and Tacos Party from 5-9 p.m. July 13. Tickets are $35 a person and include four drink tickets and entry into the Flea all weekend. The 21-and-over event will feature tacos from some favorite Denver spots, live music from Talking Heads tribute band Little Creatures and shopping with Flea vendors in advance of the Flea opening. Tickets can be used for re-entry on Saturday and Sunday.

The Flea continues from 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. July 14 and 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. July 15. Tickets are $5 a person and can be purchased online and at the door. Entrance is free for children 12 and younger.

Some of the Summer Flea’s sponsor partners will be hosting activities, including First Bank’s money-blowing booth booth that gives participants a chance to catch Flea Bucks to spend with vendors at the event and signature brews from Great Divide.

Nominations sought for Mayor's Design Awards

Denver Mayor Michael Hancock and the city’s Community Planning and Development Department are seeking nominations for the 2018 Mayor’s Design Awards.

Since 2005, the Mayor’s Design Awards have honored projects throughout the city for excellence in architecture, exterior design and place making. The awards are presented to Denver homeowners, business owners, nonprofits and artists for their creative contributions to the public realm through innovative design. Many different types of projects are eligible. Previous award winners range from restaurants and galleries to private single-family homes to plazas and other shared public spaces. What each of the projects have in common is the imaginative and innovative way they enhance public spaces and create a sense of community.

“Every year, these awards are an opportunity to celebrate what’s special abou tthe character and community of our city,” Hancock said. “I look forward to seeing nominated projects from every corner of Denver.”

Nominations are due Sept. 7. Winners will be announced at an awards ceremony in late fall.

School of Mines joins Catalyst HTI

The Colorado School of Mines will join the roster of tenants at Catalyst HTI, a healthcare innovation hub opening this summer.

The Colorado School of Mines plans to open a 1,700-square-foot office inside Catalyst HTI in early fall. The space will be an open workshop and classroom, home to Capstone Design projects, career fairs, technology information sessions and a gallery showcasing the work of students and faculty. The university’s new graduate program in quantitative biosciences and engineering and the Center for Entrepreneurship & Innovation are among the entities that will have a presence in the space.

“The biotech and healthcare industries offer great employment opportunities for Mines students and great collaborative opportunities for our faculty who are working on the cutting edge of tissue engineering, computational systems biology, medical device development and more,” Mines President Paul Johnson says. “We’re excited to join the Catalyst HTI venture, increasing our visibility in this vital, growing field of health technology at a local level and accelerating our progress toward establishing Colorado School of Mines as an innovative partner for the industry.”
 

Bohemian Foundation, Illegal Pete's partner with Colorado Creative Industries

Bohemian Foundation and Illegal Pete’s have signed on as community partners for Colorado Creative Industries’ Career Advancement Grant.

Bohemian Foundation and Illegal Pete’s will contribute funds for the upcoming Career Advancement Grant cycles with submission deadlines on June 2 and Nov. 1.

Funding for musicians and music-based businesses will be provided by Fort Collins-based Bohemian Foundation in continued support and implementation of the Colorado Music Strategy. Illegal Pete’s, a Colorado-based restaurant group and record label, will provide support to the Career Advancement Grant, which offers reimbursable, matching funds up to $2,500 to help Colorado creative entrepreneurs and artists stimulate their commercial creative businesses.

“The Colorado Music Strategy, which we developed statewide over the past several years, helps us focus on ways we can continue to amplify these results and make connections with partners interested in helping musicians advance their careers,” Colorado Creative Industries Director Margaret Hunt says.

Colorado Creative Industries is a division of the Colorado Office of Economic Development and International Trade. Established to capitalize on the immense potential for the creative sector to enhance economic growth in Colorado, the organization’s mission is to promote, support and expand the creative industries to drive Colorado’s economy, increase jobs and enhance our quality of life.
 

Public input sought on affordable housing action plan

The Denver Office of Economic Development is seeking public input and comment to its proposed 2018 federal Action Plan for local housing, economic development, public service and neighborhood facilities programs that use federal funds.

Public meetings will provide an overview of Denver’s proposed framework that partners with the Denver Housing Authority to double the Affordable Housing Fund annually — from $15 million to $30 million — and generate a new funding surge of an estimated $105 million for affordable housing over the next five years.

The draft action plan document, which will be submitted to the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD), will be available for a 30-day public comment period through June 15 and denvergov.org/oed.

The 2018 Action Plan encompasses the following federal programs:Community Development Block Grant Program, HOME Investment Partnership Program, Housing Opportunities for Persons with AIDS Program and Emergency Shelter Grant programs. The plan includes information about the overall goals and objectives for the year with a description of the available resources and proposed actions to address identified needs. All proposed activities and projects are intended to benefit the citizens of Denver who have extremely low and moderate incomes and populations that have special needs such as elderly, disabled, homeless individuals and families and people with HIV/AIDS.

The meetings will be held from 4:30 to 6 p.m. May 10 in the Wellington Webb Building, 201 W. Colfax, Rooms 4.F.6-4.G.2; and from 6 to 7:30 p.m. June 6 at the Montbello Recreation Center, 15555 E. 53rd Ave. in the community room.
 

CRUSH WALLS returns to RiNo

Artists who want to participate in CRUSH WALLS — the largest urban art events in Colorado — have until June 15 to get their applications in.

Artists may apply as individuals or as a group. They must be Colorado residents or partnered with a resident to participate.

CRUSH WALLS, which showcases local and international talent, brings art out of the galleries and onto the streets. Last year, artists created more than 80 public art murals throughout the River North Art District.

Rooted in the “where art is made” ethos of the RiNo Art District, the Denver festival has been both a planform for creative expression and a catalyst for collective gatherings. Each edition has increased the festival’s power, attracting actors from the global artistic community and drawing locals and visitors alike to the expanding urban art movement. The goal of CRUSH WALLS is to support and engage the community through access, engagement and education through arts and culture.

All artists who want to participate in CRUSH WALLS must submit an application to participate. Emails and phone calls will not be accepted.

The online application will be open through 5 p.m. June 15. A committee comprised of local artists and community leaders will score the applications and make recommendations to the CRUSH WALLS 2018 event producers, who will make final recommendations on artist participation and placement. The artist lineup will be announced no later than July 10.


 

"Happy City" exhibit will help break down social barriers

Public art that will be installed throughout the city starting May 18 will bring together 11 artists’ perspectives that address ideas of happiness and wellness.

The project — “Happy City: Art for the People” — will provide unexpected art experiences in public spaces with the purpose of breaking down persona, emotional and social barriers. The art installation sites will be located throughout Denver and include streets, alleyways, billboards, video screens, Union Station and others. in addition to the installations, “Happy City” will offer programming such as conversations and a panel discussion to engage the community.

Produced by The Denver Theatre District, “Happy City” is under the artistic direction of Black Cube, a nonprofit experimental art museum that operates nomadically. Black Cube, which partners with artist fellows to commission popup art experiences, describes itself as an unconventional museum pursuing the most effective ways to engage audiences while supporting individual artists with critical professional guidance.

“Through the artists’ diverse lenses, the ‘Happy City’ experience will focus on creating stronger communal ties and ask important questions about what it means to be happy,” says Cortney Lane Stell, Black Cube's artistic director. “The art interventions are inquisitive in tone and offer many perspectives on the topic of happiness, from practical through playful.”

Participating artists include Colorado artists Theresa Anderson, Matt Barton, Carlos Fresquez, Kelly Monico, Zach Reini, John Roemer, Joel Swanson and Frankie Toan. Also joining the exhibit are Milton Melvin Croissant III of New York, Vince McKelvie of California and Stuart Semple of the United Kingdom.
 

Most residents think city is not doing enough to battle homelessness, according to survey

A citywide survey confirmed what the Colorado Coalition for the Homeless has been saying for years: Homelessness and affordable housing are serious concerns and realities for Denver residents.

Key findings of the survey, which collected live telephone responses from 404 likely 2018 voters, include:
  • Homelessness ranked as the third-most-critical issue for the mayor and City Council to address, following affordable housing and education.
  • 96 percent of those surveyed said homelessness is a “serious problem” in Denver.
  • 66 percent said “too little” action is being taken by the mayor and City Council to make housing more affordable and address homelessness.
Of those surveyed, 68 percent own their homes, and 57 percent said they had experienced homelessness themselves or had a family member of friend who experienced homelessness.

“This data confirms what we already know and have experienced for the past 32 years: The city must prioritize making substantial investments in homelessness services and affordable housing,” says Cathy Alderman, vice president of communications and public policy at the Colorado Coalition for the Homeless. “More and more people are being marginalized and left behind by Denver’s economic growth, and it is imperative that our elected officials implement immediate strategies to reduce homelessness and provide better access to affordable housing.

The survey was sponsored by All in Denver, the Colorado Coalition for the Homeless, Del Norte Community Development Corp., Denver Foundation, Gates Family Foundation, Gorman & Co., Habitat for Humanity of Metro Denver and the Urban Land Conservancy.

RiNo Made store offers local art at Zeppelin Station

With the opening of RiNo Made at Zeppelin Station, there’s now a permanent place for artists in the RiNo Art District to show off their creative talent.

The 600-square-foot store will sell a rotating inventory of 2D artworks, as well as ceramics, sculpture, jewelry, books, stationary and other handmade gifts and homewares. RiNo Made will host a featured artist each month on the main gallery wall in the store.

“We are thrilled to be able to showcase all the amazing artwork and products created in the RiNo Art District,” says Tracy Weil, the district’s creative director. “Our goal is to tell their stories to our customers, while communicating the importance of buying local art as it helps our artists make a living at what they love to do.”

The RiNo Made store features work made exclusively by artists and makers within the RiNo Art District. Its goal is to display the work of artists and makers in the district at a permanent location, as well as create a broader platform for creative businesses to showcase their work. As part of the effort, the district will provide monthly salons dedicated to helping artists and creative entrepreneurs kick start, grow and strengthen their businesses by providing with tools and educational opportunities.

Artists will receive 60 percent of the sale of their work, with the RiNo Art District receiving 40 percent for store operations and other artists initiatives in the district.

“When visitors buy art from our artists at the RiNo Made store, they are directly supporting our vibrant artist community,” RiNo Art District President Jamie Licko said.

Located in the newly opened Zeppelin Station at 3501 Wazee Street, the district’s new store is the first retail storefront to open in Denver’s chef-driven food hall. The district’s new headquarters and office space is located adjacent to the storefront.
 

CHFA gets $7.1 grant for affordable housing

A $7.1 million grant to Colorado Housing and Finance Authority (CHFA) will support the development and preservation of affordable rental housing across the state.

CHFA estimates the grant will help provide housing for about 725 households in both rural and urban communities.

“The need for affordable housing across Colorado is significant and spans the housing continuum from those experiencing homelessness and special needs to housing for our seniors, veterans and workforce,” says Cris White, CHFA executive director and chief executive. “Investment in affordable housing is an investment in our state’s infrastructure and quality of life. We are very excited to receive this award and will use these resources to help local communities target their specific and unique housing needs.”

The Capital Magnet Fund grant will help further the reach of Colorado’s federal Low-Income Housing Tax Credits and state Affordable Housing Tax Credits by supplying additional gap funding required to make it feasible for affordable housing developments to be constructed or preserved.

Affordable housing is a much-needed resource in a state where population growth, combined with escalating development and construction costs, continues to place pressure on an already tight housing market. Colorado is ranked the fifth-most-challenging state in the nation for extremely low-income renters to find affordable housing, with only 27 affordable homes for every 100 extremely low-income renter household, according to the National Low Income Housing Coalition.

The Capital Magnet Fund is administered by the U.S. Department of the Treasury's Community Development Financial Institutions Fund (CDFI Fund). The Capital Magnet Fund was established by Congress in 2008, and offers competitively awarded grants to finance affordable housing solutions and community revitalization efforts.

Denver in program to keep low-income people in city

Denver has been selected to participate in a new program designed to stop forcing low-income residents out of cities.

Through the All-In Cities Anti-Displacement Policy Network, city teams will promote a range of strategies, including renter protections, community land trusts and community ownership models, commercial neighborhood stabilization, inclusionary zoning and other equitable development strategies. Participants will work to build the power, voice and capacity of communities directly impacted by displacement in defining the challenges and advancing solutions.

“Joining the All-In Cities Anti-Displacement Policy Network is an opportunity to work with our peer cities on new ways to ensure our economy works for everyone and address the same affordability challenges we’re all facing,” Mayor Michael Hancock said. “It’s our job to bring opportunities to communities that lift people up, not push them out, and our strong economy and market shouldn’t leave a single one of our residents behind.”

Network activities will include virtual learning labs, individualized coaching sessions with national experts and peer-to-peer learning opportunities. The network participants will first meet at the PolicyLink Equity Summit April 11-13 in Chicago. There will be another gathering this fall.

Each city has created teams of up to six local leaders, including mayors and city council members, senior city staff and community leaders. Denver’s team includes City Council President Albus Brooks; Jenny Santos, legal advocate of Servicios de La Raza Inc.; Sarah Showalter, citywide planning supervisor with Denver Community Planning and Development; Melissa Thate, housing policy officer with the Denver Office of Economic Development; and Tracy Winchester, executive director of the Five Points Business District.

“The timing of our selection to this network speaks to the challenges we currently face as a city and our call to ultimate inequality,” Brooks said. “Economic growth has the capacity to build both bridges and barriers. Economic success must be shared by all. This network allows us to collaborate on smart policies that will create a truly inclusive economy for all residents.”

Other cities selected for the network are Austin, Texas; Boston; Nashville; Philadelphia; Portland, Ore.; San Jose, Calif.; Santa Fe, N.M. and Minneapolis-St. Paul, Minn.


 

Here's the tasty lineup of eateries for brand new Zeppelin Station

A variety of culinary talents will have the opportunity to showcase their skills in the latest concept to be announced for Zeppelin Station, a creative workplace and marketplace slated to open March 12 at the 38th and Blake light-rail station in Denver’s River North neighborhood.

No Vacancy will feature a rotating lineup of of local, national and international restaurants that will occupy the front-and-center space, each for a 60- to 90-day stint.

The first guest to stay in No Vacancy will be Comal, the heritage food incubator in partnership with non-profit Focus Points Family Resource Center, where female entrepreneurs from the Globeville and Elyria-Swansea districts cook and serve the Mexican, El Salvadorian, Syrian and Ethiopian foods they grew up eating, while honing their culinary and business skills. Zeppelin Station will be the second, albeit temporary, outpost of Comal, which calls the Taxi development its permanent home.

The rest of the of food and beverage lineup includes:
  • Kiss + Ride, the main floor bar
  • Big Trouble, the upstairs cocktail bar and lounge
  • Namkeen, Indian snacks and street food
  • injoi, Korean comfort food
  • Au Feu: Montreal Smoked Meats
  • Vinh Xuong Bakery, a third-generation, family-owned banh mi shop
  • Aloha Poke Co., made-to-order raw fish bowls
  • Gelato Boy, a Boulder-based gelato shop
  • Dandy Lion Coffee


A full-service anchor restaurant, separate from the food stalls, will be revealed this summer.

“When we originally envisioned Zeppelin Station, we imagined a day and night destination where you’d find the most sought-after food and drinks in the city,” says Justin Anderson, director of hospitality development for Zeppelin Development. “Over the past year, we’ve assembled a lineup of highly regarded, independent operators who will showcase their very best dishes in an environment that encourages diners to personally experience the dishes being prepared through smell, sight and sound.”

The market hall also will be the new home of the RiNo Arts District and the organization’s retail shop that showcases pieces created by local artists

Designed by award-winning Dynia Architects, Zeppelin Station is on track for LEED certification and features indoor-outdoor open spaces, high ceilings, natural light and native plants in the exterior landscapes. Above the market hall, three floors of office suites offer roll-up garage doors that provide access onto green roof terraces overlooking the Denver skyline and Rocky Mountains. Office tenants include Beatport, Brandfolder and Love Your Hood.

“Denverites are seeking similar amenities in their workplace that they have at home: well-designed spaces, ready access to fresh air, great views and natural light in a hall experience on the ground floor that is the ultimate amenity,” says Kyle Zeppelin, president of Zeppelin Development.
 
178 RiNo Articles | Page: | Show All
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