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Eight acres by 38th and Blake transit stop slated for development

Six city blocks of Denver’s River North Arts District (RiNo) adjacent to the 38th and Blake transit station will be transformed into a mixed-use destination that will include residences, offices and retail space.


Denver-based Tributary Real Estate, in partnership with Charles Street Partners of Boston, has been working with Oz Architecture to develop the master plan and primary residential and retail building designs for the development, dubbed Giambrocco. Gensler is leading the concept design for the creative office building and a boutique hotel and adapting an existing building into a marketplace concept. Wenk & Associates will create design the streetscape and landscape.


“RiNo is Denver’s bustle of commerce, the vigor of production, the incubation of ideas and the freedom of artistic spirit,” says Bill Parkhill, a member of the development team. “As the developers, we’ve embraced these diverse influences to create a neighborhood where it all works together.”


The neighborhood is expected to include:
  • More than 500,000 square feet of Class A office space with parking that can be converted to offices over time
  • 350 market-rate and affordable apartments spread throughout the development
  • Live/work art studios sprinkled throughout the parcels to activate the street
  • Retail strategically located in hot spots that serve the surrounding neighborhood
  • Public art throughout the project

 

 


New chef brings new menu to The Preservery

A new chef has joined The Preservery, and with a new chef comes a new menu.

Chef Mason Bennett, who has been tapped to lead the RiNo restaurant’s kitchen, will focus on small plates and items to share. His emphaisi is on simple, healthy food that highlights local and seasonal ingredients, as well as embracing The Preservery’s love for all things preserved.

Expect to see more vegetable-focused items as well. Bennett has worked with owners Obe and Whitney Ariss to add more personal touches to the imenu, such as the Colorado Fingerling Poutine, and Burnt Eggplant Baba Ganoush — homages to Obe’s Canadian and Lebanese roots. 

Some old favorites will remain, such as the octopus with smoked tomato sauce and the Growhaus kale caesar, as well as other mainstays like the cheese charcuterie and bread boards highlighting local and house-made items. Freshly baked breads made with local, organic flour will continue to be a focus, featuring naturally fermented sourdough, a recipe and method handed down from Whitney’s father.

A Boulder native, Bennett brings 18 years of experience working in restaurants such as Arugula, Jax and Basta.

McWhinney starts two apartment projects

Developer McWhinney has broken ground on two multi-family projects in downtown Denver.

RIDE at RiNo, at 36th and Wynkoop in Denver’s RiNo district, will have 84 micro-loft apartments. Amenities include electric vehicle charging stations, rooftop deck, a fifth-floor clubhouse and on-site management. Car 2 Go will have two vehicles on site. A partnership with neighboring Helikon Gallery will provide a rotating display of artwork throughout the project.

Sova will have 211 apartments at the corner o 19th Avenue and Grant Street in Denver’s Uptown neighborhood. The majority of the units will be studios and one-bedrooms, with a sprinkling of two-bedrooms and a row of street-level townhome-style units. Amenities for the 12-story building include a golf simulator, a 24-hour fitness facility, co-working spaces, bike and ski repair, and a dog spa and bark park. The project also includes electric vehicle charging stations and a fourth-floor deck and fitness center.

McWhinney also has two other multi-family projects under development: Pinyon Pointe, a 166-unit apartment project in Loveland and the 405-unit Cycle Apartments in Fort Collins.
 

How to get a deal at Denver's best coffee shops

If you’re a coffee junkie, the Fika Coffee Passport is your ticket to learning all about Denver’s vibrant coffee scene.

The $20 passport features 28 craft shops and roasters featuring two-for-one coffee specials per venue between April 1 and July 31. Some of the participating venues include Allegro Coffee Roasters, The Denver Bicycle Cafe, Huckleberry Roasters, Pablo’s Coffee and Pigtrain Coffee.

Why is it called Fika? Because a fika is a custom in Swedish culture that celebrates a break from work for a bit of play. The Passport Program folks liked the idea of getting out of the office to meet a friend for a chat over a cup of coffee.

The locations in the booklet were selected for both atmosphere and quality coffee and each offers a one-of-a-kind experience. You can share your coffee with a friend or enjoy both yourself. Each location has crafted a speciality beverage that best represents their shop or practices. You can also substitute any craft coffee drink for a drip coffee.

For every book sold, $1 will be donated to Colorado Public Radio.

RiNo Art District leases space at Zeppelin Station

The RiNo Art District will lease about 2,300 square feet of office and retail space at Zeppelin Station, the 25,000-square-foot ground-floor food and retail hall slated to open this fall at the 38th Street light-rail station in RiNo.

The new location will provide the art-centric organization with a more public face and a retail presence to support artists.

“The RiNo Art District’s primary responsibility is to ensure this neighborhood is a place that artists, creators and makers can work, live and thrive,” says Jamie Licko, president of the district. “As the neighborhood’s profile grows, so too does the cost of being here. If we are to serve the neighborhood, we must give artists the ecnomic platform to succeed. The retail store will serve as a ‘front of house’ for the RiNo offices, meaning this location will serve our organization and our neighborhood as a key entry point to exploring all of RiNo.”

Designed by architect Stephen Dynia, Zeppelin Station is characterized by its minimalist design that features a ground-floor food and retail hall and three floors of creative work spaces above, all taking advantage of views of downtown Denver and the Front Range. In addition to the RiNo Art District, the ground floor will feature six street food counters representing Vietnam, Japan and Mexico, as well as fashion and home goods retailers.

“At its core, Zeppelin Station is a place for diverse communities to engage with art and design,” says Kyle Zeppelin, principal at Zeppelin Development. “We jumped at the opportunity to showcase the RiNo Art District as a signature part of that program.”

City of Cranes: A whopping 42 projects either planned or under construction downtown

Forty-two projects with an investment value of $2.8 billion are either under construction or planned in downtown Denver, according to the 2017 State of Downtown Denver Report recently released by the Downtown Denver Partnership. 

The projects will add more than 1,000 hotel rooms, 5,000 residences and 2.5 million square feet of office space. 

“Great cities do not happen by accident,” says Tami Door, president and CEO of the Downtown Denver Partnership. “Our thriving center city is a result of a strategic vision to build one of the most economically powerful center cities in the country, and the metrics outlined in the 2017 State of Downtown Denver signal great success. Our residential population is expanding at unprecedented rates, $2.8 billion is being invested through development projects, we’ve added 6,000 jobs and 23 new companies have relocated to or opened a new office in the center city to grow their business in the last 24 months.”

Downtown Denver’s workforce of 130,227 people has grown at a rate of 17 percent since 2010, outpacing the national rate of 11 percent. Employment is led by new and growing private-sector businesses, where employment is up 21 percent.

Nearly 80,000 people are choosing to live in downtown Denver and its center city neighborhoods. Population in the downtown core has tripled since 2000, and more than 66 percent of downtown residents have a bachelor’s degree or higher.Downtown’s residential renaissance and its growing employee base is encouraging new retail development. Retail sales tax collection is anchored by restaurants, which make up 44 percent of the revenue. 

There is a diverse array of educational opportunities, from traditional universities to coding schools that is helping to build the workforce of the future and ensure downtown businesses have access to top talent. About 58,000 students are being educated in the center city at a variety of educational institutions.

$250 million development on tap for Cole neighborhood

Saunders Construction has teamed up with the owners of the former Denver Rock Drill building to develop a $250 million, 700,000-square-foot building with offices, retail, residences and a hotel near the 38th and Blake transit station in the historic Cole neighborhood.

The project will include 150,000 square feet of adaptive reuse of historic buildings, as well as 550,000 square feet of new construction that will have 150,000 square feet of office space, 65,000 square feet of retail, 180 residences and a 175-key hotel by Sage Hospitality. Built as machine shops, the preserved historic buildings will provide large, flexible floor plates, as well as 25-foot ceilings allowing significant flexibility for office use and mezzanines.

“I knew early on there was going to be light rail coming into the area, which at the time was a Denver Regional Council of Governments (DRCOG) program, and I knew the neighborhood would eventually undergo major changes, although I don’t think I anticipated the pace of change would be so fast,” says Byron Weiss, who with his sons Andy and Brett own the property. “I knew this property had enormous potential, both from a local perspective and from a cultural perspective with its deep Denver history.”

Located on 39th Avenue between Franklin and High streets, the property’s history dates to 1910, when it was the home of Denver Rock Drill Manufacturing Company, whose line of pneumatic rock drills were used around the world. By the 1920s, the facilities occupied more than a city block and housed a community of 600 employees.

Weiss, a Denver native and longtime resident of the Cole neighborhood, acquired the property in 1992 in one of the last big sales made during the savings and loan crisis of the 1990s. The site is now home to his company, Porta Power, a material handling and warehouse supply company. 

Just one stop from Denver Union Station and 30 minutes from Denver International Airport, the project will serve as a bridge between the River North Arts District and Col Neighborhood Historic District. Designed by Tryba Architects, the project will feature a unique character of lanes, courtyards and rail spurs intended to create opportunities for exploration and discovery. The retail environment will reflect a culture of craft, production and innovation, blending the best that Denver and Colorado has to offer with national and international brands.

“There is no other place in Denver with such untouched industrial history and the ability to completely customize and repurpose three full city blocks,” says Dorit Fischer, broker for Shames Makovsky, who is handling retail leasing for Denver Rock Drill. “We think there are numerous food and beverage operators and cutting-edge companies that will want to be part of this unique site.”

The project is pre-leasing office and retail space in Phase 1, which includes the redevelopment of the existing structures, as well as the hotel. Cushman & Wakefield is handling the office leasing.

Smart-pill drug delivery firm joins Catalyst HTI

A company that’s developing a smart-pill drug delivery and monitoring system is the latest tenant to join Catalyst HTI in RiNo.

Veloce Corp. joins a community that will include national healthcare organizations like Kaiser Permanente, Anschutz Medical Campus and American Osteopathic Association, as well as health-tech startups like CirrusMD, BurstIQ and Telespine.

“We’re thrilled to be joining the Catalyst HTI community,” says Robert Niichel, CEO of Veloce. “Moving our offices to the building should help us acquire funding, forge partnerships and meet clients. It will also enable healthcare providers to learn about our SmartTab drug delivery and monitoring system.”

SmartTab will deliver active ingredients to specific areas of the human body at specific times or in response to a monitored physiological condition. The system will interface with custom or current wearable monitoring technology. It has the capability to deliver a wide range of active ingredients and interact with the Internet of Medical Things to optimize patient care.

“Our SmartTab platform achieves a level of precision in drug delivery that was previously impossible,” Niichel says. “With SmartTabs, providers can monitor the efficacy of treatment regimens and ensure medical compliance, which can be a costly and often deadly problem.”

After being spun out of Nano Pharmaceutical Laboratories in 2015, Veloce was accepted into StartUp Health’s investment portfolio, which contains nearly 200 health-tech startups. Veloce received a patent for its drug delivery and monitoring system earlier this year.

And now in ice cream news: Pushing the possibilities of flavor at High Point

High Point Creamery has introduced its spring flavor menu, with four new flavors,  three fan favorites returning and a reinvention of one of its most popular ice creams.

The four new flavors are Put the Lime in the Coconut Milk, Violet and Lime, Stawberry Rhubarb Crisp and a new seasonal sorbet — I’m Peach Mint. High Point Creamery will donate 10 percent of the pint sales of I’m Peach Mint to the Rocky Mountain Immigrant Advocacy Network.

The three returning flavors include Darkest Chocolate, Chamomile with Strawberry Swirl and Cherry Miso with Chocolate Freckles.

The reinvented Cookies & Cream is three different types of cookies, along with a classic chocolate wafer. The cookies are broken into bits and blended into a vanilla icing ice cream.

High Point Creamery now has two retail locations — one at the intersection of South Holly and Cedar in the Hilltop/Crestmoor neighborhood and one at Denver Central Market in RiNo. The company will be operating a food truck, Big Pinky, around town and plans to open a third store in west Denver later this summer.

Arts & Venues partners with Meow Wolf on art space effort

Denver Arts & Venues is teaming up with Santa Fe's Meow Wolf to help with the compliance and safety needs of the city's Do-It-Yourself and alternative spaces.

Arts & Venues will contribute $20,000 toward funding the program organized by Meow Wolf, which previously announced plans to distribute $100,000 in annual funding to support safer DIY music and arts venues across the country. Arts & Venue's money will support infrastructural improvements, rent assistance, materials, equipment and other needs identified by Denver applicants. The fund also supports additional resources for legal, zoning and building code consulting services.

"Meow Wolf was an ideal partner for addressing short-term needs while we continue to explore more long-terms opportunities to support safe, creative spaces," says Kent Rice, executive director of Arts & Venuses. "As an artist collective, Meow Wolf has emerged as a leader in the region, working closely with Denver-based artists and reacting quickly to the acute space challenges of artists nationwide with the development of its funding program."

Meow Wolf is collecting applications for Denver-based funding until March 31. 

In addition to Arts & Venues' efforts, Denver Community Planning and Development and the Denver Fire Department have taken steps to support the needs of the arts community. For those seeking to turn an existing warehouse or commercial space into a live/work space, CPD launched a guide that outlines basic steps for establishing a safe and legal live/work space in an existing building. The fire department is offering free inspections for tenants and landlords, who can apply through March 31.

Contact Confluence Denver Development News Editor Margaret Jackson with tips and leads for future stories at margaret@confluence-denver.com.

Regis joins Catalyst HTI

Regis University will join the health-tech innovation campus Catalyst HTI, slated to open in RiNo in 2018.

As a higher education partner, Regis' College of Computer & Information Science (CC&IS) will bring its expertise in health informatics, data science and cybersecurity to Catalyst HTI, collaborating with other health-tech industry leaders such as Hitachi Inc., the American Diabetes Association and the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus to transform the digital health environment.

"Regis is proud to be a partner in this new kind of health-tech venture at Catalyst HTI," says CC&IS Dean Shari Plantz-Masters. "It signals we are involved in helping solve problems within our society, which dovetails so well with the Regis mission of educating and inspiring our future leaders to have a positive effect on the world."

Catalyst HTI is an industry integrator, bringing together relevant stakeholders in health-tech innovation -- from single-person startups and Fortune 500 companies to nonprofit organizations and healthcare providers -- to build a community in which collaboration and integration lead to accelerated innovation within the industry.

"We are thrilled to have Regis University as a member of our community," says Mike Biselli, president of Catalyst HTI. "Regis is a leader in cybersecurity and the protection of health-care information. The College of Computer & Information Science's ability to attract industry leaders to join its faculty will help us accelerate our health-care innovations."

Contact Confluence Denver Development News Editor Margaret Jackson with tips and leads for future stories at margaret@confluence-denver.com.

Logan House Coffee to open in Catalyst HTI

Logan House Coffee Company will open its second location at Catalyst HTI in River North.

Founded by friends Andre Janusz and Brooks Gagstetter in 2013, Logan House Coffee sources its beans from around the world and brings them to Colorado green to perform the roasting locally. Initially, Logan House Coffee was available only by deliver to customers' front doors and businesses. Recently the company added a retail location and moved its RiNo-based roastery to Stanley Marketplace in the Stapleton neighborhood. 

"We love the community focus of Catalyst," Janusz says. "We know how important community is to the success of a business, and we wanted to be in an atmosphere that offers a community feel -- a space that encourages work and creativity and engaging with those around you."

Located off the lobby in Catalyst, the 1,624-square-foot space will have a center counter and bar with style and finishes that reflect the RiNo neighborhood. Five Logan House roasts will always be offered on a monthly rotating basis, as well as beer, wine and specialty food items from local chefs, including breakfast burritos, pastries and charcuterie plates. The cafe will open early next year as part of Phase One of Catalyst.

"We are thrilled to be returning to RiNo, which has become the most innovative part of town," Gagstetter says. "And we are even more excited to be part of the premier project in the area."

Contact Confluence Denver Development News Editor Margaret Jackson with tips and leads for future stories at margaret@confluence-denver.com.

Preservery chef to appear on Food Network's "Chopped"

One of Denver's own will be appearing on Food Network's Chopped at 8 p.m. Feb. 21.

Dave Hadley, sous chef at The Preservery, will face off against three other chefs preparing a three-course meal consisting of an appetizer, entree and desert. In each round, they have to use all the ingredients the show provides them, even if they are a little strange. At the end of each course, a panel of three guest judges chops one chef sho doesn't measure up. The last chef standing takes hop $10,000.

Hadley has been cooking at The Preservery since the beginning nearly a year ago. He discovered his love for food early on after spending time in the kitchen with his grandmother. A graduate of the Culinary Institute of America, Hadley has worked for many of Colorado's esteemed restaurants and chefs, including Acorn and the first Biju's Little Curry Shop.

Hadley also loves to teach kids about cooking and has been known to give impromptu classes when young friends stop by. 

"The Preservery is very proud to call him a leader on the kitchen team and grateful to benefit from his tireless drive, his attention to detail, his creative spirit and his passion and talent for making things taste delicious," says Whitney Ariss, co-owner of the restaurant. 

The restaurant will be closed the evening the show airs for a viewing party.

Contact Confluence Denver Development News Editor Margaret Jackson with tips and leads for future stories at margaret@confluence-denver.com.

Denver housing inventory hits record low

The number of homes on the market in metro Denver dropped 6.47 percent to 3,989 in January -- an all-time low for any January on record, according to a recent report from the Denver Metro Association of Realtors (DMAR).

"Low housing inventory has been a key driver for over two years now, and I don't see that changing any time soon," says Denver real estate agent Steve Danyliw, chairman of the DMAR Market Trends Committee. "Historically, inventory follows a seasonal pattern. We see the bottom in January to February, then peaking in late August to September. The second driver is mortgage interest rates. All predictions indicate a steady rise in interest rates throughout 2017. This could compel buyers that are sitting on the sideline to get into the big game."

The number of homes sold declined by 33.21 percent in January, compared to the previous month, but the average sold price increased 3.86 percent to $448,373. The median sale price remained relatively unchanged at $380,000. Year-over-year housing prices have increased 9.25 and 9.99 percent in the average and median sale prices, respectively.

"Sellers are thrilled by the price appreciation and buyers are frustrated by the low inventory," Danyliw says. "If you're a real estate agent working with a homebuyer under the$400,000 price point, you have a front-row seat to a real estate feeding frenzy."

Contact Confluence Denver Development News Editor Margaret Jackson with tips and leads for future stories at margaret@confluence-denver.com.

Regus opening new coworking concept in Ballpark

The largest provider of flexible workspace globally is bringing its new coworking space concept to Denver. 

Regus plans to open SPACES Denver-Ballpark Feb. 27 in a historic building at 2301 Blake St., featuring 40 dedicated desks, a 5,000-square-foot business club, three meeting rooms for members and community residents and concierge-level hospitality services. Coworking memberships start at $199 a month. SPACES will also offer 140 private offices starting at $650 a month.

"The Millennial customer is going to be attracted to the building and the neighborhood," says Michael Berretta, vice president of network development for the Americas at Regus. "It will also be attractive to a whole host of companies, whether it's corporations, law firms or media companies. What we're seeing is increased demand for that type of location close to restaurants and evolving residential growth areas."

Regus is opening SPACES locations across the country and around the world.  Locations that are already up and running include Amsterdam, The Netherlands; London and Liverpool in the United Kingdom; Long Island City, N.Y.; and Menlo Park, Calif. It has plans to open locations in France, Norway, Italy and Switzerland later this year.

"Our strength is a global network," Berretta says. "When a company looks to us for this type of environment, they're getting more than a single location."

Contact Confluence Denver Development News Editor Margaret Jackson with tips and leads for future stories at margaret@confluence-denver.com.
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